Download Norms: Folkways, Mores, Taboos, and Laws

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Sociology of knowledge wikipedia, lookup

History of sociology wikipedia, lookup

Index of sociology articles wikipedia, lookup

Sociology of culture wikipedia, lookup

Public sociology wikipedia, lookup

Sociological theory wikipedia, lookup

Sociology of terrorism wikipedia, lookup

Sociology of the family wikipedia, lookup

Social norm wikipedia, lookup

Labeling theory wikipedia, lookup

Third culture kid wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Norms: Folkways, Mores, Taboos, and Laws
ABOUT.COM
FOOD
HEALTH
12/1/14, 2:13 PM
HOME
MONEY
TECHNOLOGY
TRAVEL
MORE
VIDEOS
Search...
About.com
About Education
Sociology
...
Deviance and Crime
Norms: Folkways, Mores, Taboos, and Laws
By Ashley Crossman
Ads
Culture
Sociology
SOCIOLOGY
CATEGORIES
Sociology 101: The Basics
Research and Methodology
Subfields of Sociology
Profiles of Major Sociologists
Major Sociological Works
Sociological Theory
Sociology Dictionary:
Sociological Terms from A to Z
FREE EMAIL
NEWSLETTER
Let About.com send you
the latest from our
Sociology Expert.
Your email address here
SIGN UP
You can opt-out at any time.
Please refer to our privacy policy for contact
information.
Share this
Cultures
Sociology of Education
Muslim Culture
Gender
Folk Culture
Cultural
Food Culture
In sociology, you will hear the
term "norm" quite often.
Norms are the specific
cultural expectations for how
to behave in a given situation.
They are the agreed-upon
expectations and rules by
which the members of a
culture behave. Norms vary
from culture to culture, so
some things that are
considered norms in one
culture may not be in another
culture. For example, in
Ryan McVay/ Digital Vision/ Getty Images
America it is a norm to
maintain direct eye contact when talking with others and it is often considered rude if you
do not look at the person you are speaking with. In Asian, on the other hand, averting
your eyes when conversing with others is a sign of politeness and respect while direct
eye contact is considered rude.
Ads
How to Stop Your Divorce
marriagemax.com/Free-Help
"I suggest your read this..." 7
Secrets to Stopping Your Divorce.
Is He Cheating On You?
spokeo.com/Cheating-SpouseSearch
Enter His Email Address. Find Pics &
Profiles From 70+ Social Networks
1.Click For Free Download
pdf-for-mac.com
2. Get Your Free PDF Converter 3.
Enjoy!
• Social
• Values Education
http://sociology.about.com/od/Deviance/a/Folkways-Mores-Taboos-And-Laws.htm
There are four basic types of norms that
sociologists commonly refer to: folkways,
mores, taboos, and laws.
TODAY'S TOP 5 PICKS IN
EDUCATION
5
Cultural forms of dress or food habits are
examples of folkways. In America, if
someone belched loudly while eating at the
dinner table with other people, he or she
would be breaking a folkway. It is culturally
appropriate to not belch at the dinner table,
however if this folkway is broken, there are
Why Today Is
Black Friday
By Kimberly Amad
US Economy Exp
4
Who Was
Shakespeare
Wife?
By Lee Jamieson
Shakespeare Exp
Folkways
Folkways are often referred to as "customs."
They are standards of behavior that are
socially approved but not morally significant.
They are norms for everyday behavior that
people follow for the sake of tradition or
convenience. Breaking a folkway does not
usually have serious consequences.
Religion Culture
3
Simple Quest
Teachers Sho
Ask Students
By Janelle Cox
Elementary Educa
Expert
2
Was Abraham
Lincoln Really
Wrestler?
By Robert McNam
19th Century Hist
1
How to Explo
Orion This
December
By Carolyn Collins
Space/Astronomy
Page 1 of 4
Norms: Folkways, Mores, Taboos, and Laws
12/1/14, 2:13 PM
no moral or legal consequences.
• Sociology Research
VIEW MORE IN EDUCATION
Mores
• Food People
Mores are strict norms that control moral
and ethical behavior. Mores are norms
based on definitions of right and wrong.
Unlike folkways, mores are morally
significant. People feel strongly about them and violating them typically results in
disapproval.
• People & Society
Religious doctrines are an example of mores. For instance, ff someone were to attend
church in the nude, he or she would offend most people of that culture and would be
morally shunned. Also, parents who believe in the more that only married people should
live together will disapprove of their daughter living with her boyfriend. They may
consider the daughter’s actions a violation of their moral guidelines.
Ads
Find a Lawyer - Free
www.presentyourcase.com
Legal Consultations by Area
Lawyers Fast, Free & Confidential
Service
ITT Tech - Official Site
itt-tech.edu
Further Your Education @ ITT Tech.
Classes Start 12/8. Apply Now!
EDUCATION VIDE
How to Say "I
Don't Like" in
Spanish
How to Say "E
Me" in Spanis
How to Say
"Subway Stat
Spanish
Taboos
A taboo is a norm that society holds so
strongly that violating it results in extreme
disgust. Often times the violator of the taboo
is considered unfit to live in that society. For
instance, in some Muslim cultures, eating
pork is taboo because the pig is considered
unclean. At the more extreme end, incest
and cannibalism are taboos in most
countries.
VIEW MORE
Laws
A law is a norm that is written down and enforced by an official law enforcement agency.
Driving while drunk, theft, murder, and trespassing are all examples of laws in the United
States. If violated, the person violating the law could get cited, owe a fine, or go to jail.
References
Andersen, M.L. and Taylor, H.F. (2009). Sociology: The Essentials. Belmont, CA: Thomson
Wadsworth.
Related Articles
Our Expert Recommends
On Being Unconventional
Folkways
What Is Organizational Culture?
Norm
Sarah Silverman: Jesus is Magic
Mores
Basic Tenets of Animal Rights
Stigma
Taboo
Sociology Of Deviance And Crime
Sociology Essentials
Why We Selfie
Ask a Sociologist
Education Slideshows
The Homeschooling
Resources You
Really Need
Homeschooling
The Selfie Debates,
Part I
Ask a Sociologist
http://sociology.about.com/od/Deviance/a/Folkways-Mores-Taboos-And-Laws.htm
5 Key Components
of Emotional
Intelligence
Page 2 of 4
Norms: Folkways, Mores, Taboos, and Laws
12/1/14, 2:13 PM
Psychology
The Selfie Debates,
Part II
Current Events in
Sociological Context
10 Questions to
Help You Identify
Any Insect
Insects
Systemic Racism:
More Than
Prejudice and
Micro-Agressions
8 Test Hacks for the
GRE Verbal Test
Test Prep
Sociology Dictionary: S
Index
Top 10 Archaeology
News Stories of the
Decade
What's the Deal
with White
Privilege?
Archaeology
Ask a Sociologist
Readers Recommend
Everything You Need to Know About
Functionalist Theory
What Is Symbolic Interaction Theory?
An Overview of Conflict Theory
Full Transcript of Emma Watson's
Speech on Gender Equality at the UN
What's the Difference Between
Deductive and Inductive Reasoning?
Ads
Research Definition
Body Language Examples
About.com
Norms
About Education
Sociology
Subfields of Sociology
Deviance and Crime
Norms: Folkways, Mores, Taboos, and Laws
http://sociology.about.com/od/Deviance/a/Folkways-Mores-Taboos-And-Laws.htm
Page 3 of 4
Norms: Folkways, Mores, Taboos, and Laws
About Education
Follow us:
We deliver. Get the best of
About Education in your inbox.
Your email address
SIGN UP
You can opt-out at any time. Please refer to our privacy
policy for contact information.
12/1/14, 2:13 PM
Our Story
Careers at
Advertise
User Agree
News
Ethics Polic
Site Map
Patent Info
All Topics
Privacy Pol
Reprints
Your Ad Ch
Cookie Pol
Help
Write for About
© 2014 About.com — All rights reserved.
http://sociology.about.com/od/Deviance/a/Folkways-Mores-Taboos-And-Laws.htm
Page 4 of 4