Download Old Norse I: Grammar - Viking Society Web Publications

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Latin syntax wikipedia, lookup

Pipil grammar wikipedia, lookup

Spanish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Georgian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Polish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Serbo-Croatian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Yiddish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Italian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Portuguese grammar wikipedia, lookup

Chinese grammar wikipedia, lookup

Ancient Greek grammar wikipedia, lookup

Modern Hebrew grammar wikipedia, lookup

Kannada grammar wikipedia, lookup

Macedonian grammar wikipedia, lookup

English clause syntax wikipedia, lookup

Udmurt grammar wikipedia, lookup

Esperanto grammar wikipedia, lookup

Old English grammar wikipedia, lookup

Swedish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Lithuanian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Russian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Germanic strong verb wikipedia, lookup

Ukrainian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Inflection wikipedia, lookup

Old Norse morphology wikipedia, lookup

Sanskrit grammar wikipedia, lookup

Scottish Gaelic grammar wikipedia, lookup

Malay grammar wikipedia, lookup

French grammar wikipedia, lookup

Zulu grammar wikipedia, lookup

Old Irish grammar wikipedia, lookup

English grammar wikipedia, lookup

Japanese grammar wikipedia, lookup

Modern Greek grammar wikipedia, lookup

Danish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Arabic grammar wikipedia, lookup

Romanian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Romanian nouns wikipedia, lookup

Russian declension wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Adjective inflexions and their function
83
The possessive adjectives of the first and second person and the
third person reflexive possessive (i.e., words corresponding to English
‘my’, ‘our’, etc. and, with pronominal function, ‘mine’, ‘ours’, etc.)
inflect according to one or other of the strong adjective patterns just
discussed. Minn ‘my’ (see 3.3.9, paradigm 21), flinn ‘your [sg.]’, sinn
‘his/her/its/their own’ go for the most part like adjectives in -in (but
without loss of the i at any point since in the possessives it is part of
the root syllable). It is worth noting, however, that in having the nom./
acc. n. sg. forms mitt, flitt, sitt, they parallel even more closely the
paradigm of the pronoun hinn, the only difference between the two
being that the root vowel of the possessives is long before everything
except a geminate consonant, e.g. minn (nom. m. sg.), míns (gen. m.
or n. sg.). Várr ‘our [pl.]’ is inflected according to the strong pattern
of the tables above, except that, as with certain pronouns, the acc. m.
sg. ends in -n (várn). Okkarr ‘our [dual]’, ykkarr ‘your [dual]’ and
y›(v)arr ‘your [pl.]’ parallel várr (acc. m. sg. okkarn, ykkarn, y›(v)arn),
but as two-syllable words drop the unstressed vowel of the second
syllable according to the pattern of the two-syllable adjectives discussed above (giving, for example, acc. f. sg. okkra, ykkra, y›ra).
It remains to list the adjective endings that follow the comparative
suffix.
Masculine
Sg.
nom.
acc.
gen.
dat.
-i
-a
-a
-a
Pl.
nom.
acc.
gen.
dat.
-i
-i
-i
-um
nom.
acc.
gen.
dat.
-i
-i
-i
-um
Feminine
Sg.
nom.
acc.
gen.
dat.
-i
-i
-i
-i
Pl.