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Chabot College
Fall 2003
Course Outline for History 44
HISTORY OF ENGLAND
Catalog Description:
44 - History of England
3 units
Interpretation and analysis of the development of English institutions; emphasis on
constitutional and economic developments. 3 hours.
[Typical contact hours: 52.5]
Prerequiste Skills:
None.
Expected Outcomes from Students:
Upon completion of the course the student should be able to:
1. analyze the island nature and Celtic, Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Danish invasions of
England which contributed to the form and shape of English society;
2. analyze the shaping of English constitutional, legal, and political traditions from the
Norman invasions, and climaxing with the Glorious Revolution of 1688;
3. analyze the coming of Christianity and its subsequent conflicts, including interaction
with political, economic, and cultural developments in English history;
4. analyze the growth and role of mercantile and industrial leadership in preparing England
for world hegemony;
5. analyze the political, social, and ideological position of England in World War I, World
War II, and the Post War Eras.
Course Content:
A.
B.
C.
The Earliest Times
1.
English History
2.
Geography and Climate
3.
Nature and Size of the British Empire
4.
Prehistoric Man in Britain
5.
The Celtic Invasions
6.
The Roman Conquest and Occupation, 55 B.C.-A.D.447
Anglo-Saxon Supremacy
1.
The Anglon-Saxon Peoples.
2.
The German Conquest of Britain.
3.
Celtic and Irish Survivals
4.
The Coming and Triumph of Christianity
5.
The Struggle with the Danes 828-1066
6.
Anglo-Saxon Life and Institutions
Norman and Early Angevin Times
1.
The Reign of William the Conqueror
2.
Anglo-Norman Feudalism
3.
The Immediate Successors of William
4.
Anglo-Norman Civilization
Chabot College
Course Outline for History 44, Page 2
Fall 2003
D.
E.
F.
G.
5.
Henry II, 1154-1189
6.
The Trend Toward a Limited Monarchy
7.
The Crusades
8.
Efforts to Maintain the Charter, 1216-1272
9.
Intellectual and Religious Developments
10.
The Growth of Towns and Business
11.
Political and Legal Problems
Constitutional Progress and Military Conflict, 1272-1485
1.
The First Two Edwards
2.
The Development of Parliament
3.
Growth and Decline of Royal Power, 1327-1399
4.
Fourteenth Century England
5.
The Hundred Years' War
6.
The First Lancastrian Kings, 1399-1413
7.
The Wars of the Roses, 1450-1485
8.
Life in the Fifteenth Century
The Tudors and the Reformation
1.
The First of the Tudors
2.
Henry VIII and Wolsey, 1509-1529
3.
The English Reformation, 1530-1547
4.
Edward VI 1547-1553 and the Widening of the Breach with Rome
5.
The Catholic Reformation and Mary Tudor, 1553-1558
6.
The Completion of the Reformation under Elizabeth
7.
Development of National Interests
8.
Elizabethan England
9.
Tudor Government
10.
Economic and Social Progress
11.
Last Days of the Tudors
The Stuarts and the Puritan Revolution
1.
Beginnings of Revolt Under James I, 1603-1625
2.
The Overthrow of the Stuarts, 1625-1649
3.
The Commonwealth and the Protectorate, 1649-1660
4.
The Restoration, 1660-1685
5.
The Reign of James II, 1685-1688
6.
Colonial and Scientific Developments
From the Protestant Settlement to the Present Day
1.
Protestant Settlement, Wars with France, 1689-1714
2.
Internal and Colonial Developments, 1714-1793
3.
The Period of the French Revolution
4.
Reaction and Reform, 1815-1865
5.
Imperialism, Liberalism, and Democracy
6.
The First and Second World Wars, Post War Era
Chabot College
Course Outline for History 44, Page 3
Fall 2003
Methods of Presentation:
1.
2.
3.
Lecture-discussion
Student reports
LRC assignments
Assignments & Methods of Evaluating Student Progress:
1.
2.
Typical Assignments
a.
Assigned reading for class discussions from selected primary sources, such
as: Boewulf; Magna Carts; Canterbury Tales; Petition of Rights; Act of
Toleration; Speeches of William Gladstone and Winston Churchill; the
Balfour Declaration
b.
Three or four essay examinations, 1500-2000 words each
c.
Student reports
Methods of Evaluating Student Progress
a.
Progressive improvement and refinement of historicity
b.
Grades A through F according to performance
c.
Final exam
Textbook(s) (Typical):
The English Heritage, Frederic Youngs, Henry Snyder, E. Reitan, Forum Press
Publishing Co., 2001, or latest edition.
Special Student Materials:
None.
tf Doc:\Hist 44
Revised: 10-22-2002