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Transcript
Dan Dickman
Associate Professor of Psychology
Ivy Tech Community College
Evansville, Indiana

"Differences can only enrich our experience, and the absence of
difference impoverishes us."
Martha Vancebury and Sylvia W. Silverman

"We may have all come on different ships, but we're in the same boat
now."
Martin Luther King, Jr

"A single twig breaks, but the bundle of twigs is strong."
Tecumseh Shawnee 1795

"I am not an Athenian, nor a Greek, but a citizen of the world."
Socrates

"Either men will learn to live like brothers, or they will die like beasts."
Max Lerner The Gifts of the Magi 1949
Daniel Dickman
Associate Professor of Psychology
Ivy Tech Community College/Evansville, IN
March 23, 2016
8:00-9:00 am

Introduction & overview

Discussion of course development

Outcomes: PSY 101

How the process works

Q&A
Purpose: to discuss and begin to integrate
globalization in community college
curriculums.
The world is shrinking, or as
Thomas Friedman
(columnist for New York
Times) believes, “the world
is flat.”
Travel is a perfect
example……
The Shrinking Globe
Examples
1500 -1840
Best average speed of
horse-drawn coaches
and sailing ships, 10
mph.
1850 - 1930
1950s
1960s
Propeller Jet
Steam locomotives aircraft passenger
average 65 mph.
300 - 400 aircraft,
Steamships average mph.
500 - 700
36 mph.
mph.
McGraw-Hill International Business 2005

The world is also
changing….

Thomas Friedman wrote:

“Just 10 years ago, Facebook
didn't exist; Twitter was a sound;
the cloud was in the sky; 4G was
a parking place; LinkedIn was a
prison; applications were what
you sent to college; and Skype,
for most people, was a typo.”

We must be cognizant of how
we respond to all of these
inevitable changes…….

“In times of change,
learners inherit the earth,
while the learned find
themselves beautifully
equipped to deal with a
world that no longer
exists.”
 Eric Hoffer

What are some
strategies we can use to
embrace this reality:

We and our students
need to be prepared to
live and work in a world
that will not have the
same defined borders
that exist even this
morning?


Learning Outcomes for the
Ivy Tech Global Studies
Mission Statement: Ivy Tech
Community College prepares
Indiana residents to learn, live,
and work in a diverse and
globally competitive
environment.

Knowledge—Students have the ability to:

Demonstrate contextualized knowledge of at least
one culture, nation, and/or region beyond the U.S.
Demonstrate knowledge of global issues,
processes, trends, and systems, and the role of the
U.S. in the world
Recognize how professions are defined and
practiced in international and cultural contexts
Understand his or her culture within a global and
comparative context and through the perspective
of others













Skills—Students have the ability to:
Effectively communicate across cultures
Contextualize and analyze connections among local and
global phenomena
Make choices and decisions informed by multiple frames
of reference, including international and cultural contexts
Use foreign language skills and/or knowledge of other
cultures to extend his or her access to information,
experiences, and understanding
Action and Responsibility—Students have willingness to:
Act upon acquired knowledge, skills, and attitudes in
global and local contexts
Consider ethical dimensions of global issues, inequalities,
and one’s efficacy in the world
Participate in international/intercultural experiences,
interactions, or collaborations
Demonstrate leadership skills in a global context


Global Learning Across
Indiana
3 core groups of Ivy Tech
faculty have been working
with the Center for the
Study of Global Change at
Indiana University since
January 2013 for the
internationalization of the
Ivy Tech curriculum and the
development of a Global
Learning Certificate which
will be available at Ivy Tech
campuses throughout the
state. .




The core groups have
attended regular
professional development
workshops to support
them in the process of
internationalization of
select courses across all
regions:
Cohort 1: 2013
Cohort 2:2014
Cohort 3:2015

Process:

Outcome based design

Start small

Make it measurable

Formative & Summative
Evaluation

GLOBAL STUDIES MODULE FORMAT

Ivy Tech Community College- Global Studies Program





Name:
School:
Course Number and Title:
Module Title:
Description of the Module:



Educational Objectives of the Module (should constitute a minimum of 12% of the course):
1.
2.




Outline of Lectures/Discussions:
1.
2.
3.

Listing of Resources Used to Support the Module (readings, videos, podcasts, documentaries, etc.):

Description of the Assignments Used to Facilitate an Understanding of the Module Objectives (writings,
interviews, reflections, experiential projects or field work):

Evaluation/Testing Used to Assess the Comprehension of the Module:

Resources (Bibliography) used to Develop/implement the Module:

Goals of the module:

To help students gain a greater
understanding of another culture
regarding child rearing attitudes
and practices.

To provide an opportunity for
students to gain a greater
understanding of the variances
between the beliefs and practices of
another culture and their own.

To have students critically think
about the commonalities and
differences of family structures and
child rearing practices of another
culture vs. their own.

PSYC 101 Module Title:

The relationship of Individualism-Collectivism to Social and
Developmental Psychology

Objectives:

1. Students will be able to identify and describe the difference between
individualistic and collective societal structures and provide two
examples of how this might be reflected in different developmental
outcomes for people living in United States (typically individualistic)
and countries considered more collectivistic such as India or China.

2. Students will have a greater appreciation of how and individualistic
and collectivistic cultural perspectives have developed (biological,
evolutionary, social) and can affect the manner in which our behaviors
impact and are impacted by the real or perceived influence of others.

Lecture/Discussion on
Individualism &
Collectivism

Example slide from PPt.


Individualist cultures value independence. They promote personal ideals,
strengths, and goals, pursued in competition with others, leading to individual
achievement and finding a unique identity.
Collectivist cultures value interdependence. They promote group and societal
goals and duties, and blending in with group identity, with achievement
attributed to mutual support.
Individualist and Collectivist Cultures Compared
CHILD-REARING BELIEFS AND PRACTICES IN
INDIAN CULTURE
BY MARION LOUGHEED,
6 ARTICLES ABOUT PARENTING
PRACTICES IN INDIA & CHINA


Traditional Indian parenting practices
By Thomas Kulanjiyil
What are some of the salient features of
traditional Indian parenting? What does
traditional Indian parenting have to offer to
the Indian American immigrant parent?
The traditional Indian parenting is shaped by
the cultural and religious values of the land,
generational wisdom, and life experiences.
The goal of parenting is comprehensive
development of children and it integrates
the cognitive, emotional, and spiritual
components of an individual’s growth. It
includes both the personal and social
dimensions of human growth and
development………
Could there be some minimal universal parameters for child rearing that
could be considered with culture-specific ones in cases such as the one
where two Indian children were taken from their parents by Norwegian
child welfare, asks Rakesh Shukla
▪ Discussion Exercise
▪ After reading the articles that
were provided to you and
reading pages (138-139 & 450452) in the Myers text, divide
into groups of four and answer
the following questions:
▪ Identify three values and/or
attitudes about child rearing
and family that are similar to
what you read in the articles
and what you know about
child rearing and family in
the United States.
▪ Identify three values and/or
attitudes that are different
in India and/or China vs. the
United States.

What might be some reasons for such
differences? Are there cultural points
of view we discussed in this chapter
that might be contributing to how
India vs. the United States view the
issue of child rearing or family?

If you had the opportunity to ask a
father or mother from India any
questions about how they raise their
children, what might they be, and
why?

Do you think that your view about
child rearing / family is better or worse
than what you have read about India?
Why?

Reflection paper

Write a reflection paper after the
class activity and respond to the
following questions:

1.
From a psychological frame of
reference, what might be some of
the reasons there is a variance
between expectations for parenting
in India and China vs. the United
States?
2. How might our view of such
cultural differences (individualistic
/collectivistic) impact our judgment
of those families and the society of
which they are part?


Construction Specifics:

Format: This paper is designed to reflect your
thinking process and should be 3 pages in
length, typed, double-spaced and in a 12-point
Times New Roman (TNR) font with one-inch
margins. Grammar and spelling will be
evaluated. This reflection paper is to be used
as proof of meeting a level of understanding
about variant parenting practices and
expectations in other global cultures and how
they compare to the United States. I expect
your writing to be thoughtful and meaningful.

Due Date: Your reflection paper is due one
week after the completion of our in-class
discussion.

(see grading rubric in next slide)
Reflection
Paper Rubric
Format
Grammar and
Spelling
Points
Possible
5
5
5
Organization
15
Reflection
10
Completeness
Exceeds Standards
Meets Standards
Unsatisfactory
Paper is neatly typed,
double-spaced, 12-point
TNR font, one-inch
margins, and 3 pages in
length. (5)
No errors. (5)
Paper is neatly typed,
double-spaced, 12- TNR
font, one-inch margins
and 2 pages in length. (4)
Formatting rules
ignored, shorter than 2.5
pages in length. (1-3)
1-2 minor errors. (3-4)
Well-organized, well
written, easy to read and
understand. (5)
Shows strong evidence of
reasoned reflection and
depth. (14-15)
Addresses all elements
contained within the two
stated questions of
assignment and extends
beyond. (10)
Well-organized but “flow”
could be improved. (3-4)
Lacks basic proofreading
or contains major errors.
(1-2)
Organization lacking and
difficult or impossible to
follow. (1-2)
Lacks reflection and
depth. (1-10)
Shows evidence of
reasoned reflection. (1113)
Addresses all elements
contained within the two
stated questions of
assignment. (7-9)
Fails to address all the
elements contained
within the two stated
questions of assignment.
(1-6)
Score

Excerpt from a reflection paper:

“….Different cultures have their distinct expectations for parenting
which might be unacceptable from another culture’s point of view.
People who live in individualistic communities like America, might
find parenting styles of collectivistic cultures too harsh while Indian
and Chinese parents might argue that American parents spoil their
children and are not strict enough. Individualistic western people
might view collectivistic eastern cultures as too hard on children, not
valuing personal independence, unfair for women, and not valuing
personal preferences. People from collectivistic cultures might
consider parents of individualistic cultures ignorant towards
education, cold with their children, not teaching their children how
to be polite, and not caring about one another. The way people
judge different cultures depends on the cultural views that they have
been raised with….”
Global Studies Unit Analysis
Analysis
5 objective questions which focused upon the concepts we discussed in greater detail in the class where the global studies unit was
Implemented as opposed to the “control” class were given to students as part of their regular objective exam which covered the
information in this chapter as well as two other chapters. (Note: the material on collectivistic and individualistic cultural perspectives
was covered in both classes; however, there were no discussion groups or articles about differing parenting perspective in the control
classroom.)

Results:
Objective questions
An unpaired t-test of the means of the two sets of scores was performed. For the purpose of this report, the mean is the average of the
number of students out of twenty who provided the correct answer on each of the 5 questions (e.g. 18.4/20 vs. 13/20) which focused
upon the content area covered in the book (both classes) compared to the group who participated in the class discussion and wrote reflection
paper (global studies unit class). Below are the results from the two groups:
(Group 1 = global studies)
(Group 2 = control)






Summary
Group 1
Mean
18.4
Variance
1.3
SD
1.14
N
5
t = 6.19 (the critical value for t for this comparison with df=8 and a=.01 is 3.355)
Group 2
13
2.5
1.58
5

Conclusion: the means of group (class) 1 and group (class) 2 are significantly different with group one (who participated in the
global studies unit) scoring significantly better than group two as far as content questions that relate to individualistic and collectivistic
cultures.
While I cannot attribute those differences only to the utilization of the global studies unit in group one as opposed to group two (I am
not certain that these groups were equal in everything but the exposure to the global studies unit), I can say that that group one
demonstrated a greater level of understanding about individualistic and collectivistic cultures as measured through the use of those
five objective questions.

Global Learning

Global Learning Across Indiana
Global Studies Certificate
Study Abroad
Resources



https://www.ivytech.edu/globallearning/
 http://www.indiana.edu/~global/glai
/
 Midwest Institute for
International/Intercultural
Education
 http://miiie.org/

Institution
Course Title
Format
Instructor
Time Required
Ivy Tech Community College
Introduction to Sociology
Traditional, although adaptable to online or hybrid formats
Evan Brown
Lesson Title
45 minutes + homework
Class Size
Evaluating Deviance
15-30
Relevant
Chapter(s)
Crime and Deviance
Description
In this three part activity, students will be asked to evaluate different deviant scenarios and rank them
accordingly. Part 1 of the activity has them evaluating deviant behavior from a US culture perspective, part 2
has them evaluating deviance in other cultures, and part 3 has them evaluating deviance from a cultural
relativistic perspective.
Learning
Objective(s)
1.
2.
3.
Understand the concept of the social construction of reality
Practice thinking from a culturally relativistic viewpoint
Recognize cultural difference in deviance
Relevant Course
Objective(s)
1.
Describe the processes of socialization, the formation of social structure, and assess the social construction
of reality from a multi-cultural perspective.
Define and describe such sociological terms as society, culture, socialization, groups, deviance, institutions
(e.g. religion, family, education, work, political), social movements, demographics (age, gender, race,
ethnicity), social change and social stratification.
Describe sociological concepts and their application to everyday living – ways that these concepts
facilitate meeting life’s daily challenges.
2.
3.
Core Concept(s)
Addressed
1. Social construction of reality/social control
2. Crime/Deviance
3. Cultural Relativism and ethnocentrism
Student Retention
Features
Bloom’s
Taxonomy
Targets
In class, product related, group activity. Both formative and summative assessments. Application to local and
global realities. Outside class responsibility.
Remembering
Understanding
Applying
Other Learning
Targets
Analyzing
X
Evaluating
Creating
1. Contextualize and analyze complex connections among local and global phenomena.
2. Make choices and decisions informed by multiple frames of reference, including international and cultural
contexts.
3. Recognize oneself and one’s culture through the perception of others.
Pre- Class
Preparation
For Instructor
Prepare Power Point slides, copy handouts for Parts 1, 2, 3

Study Abroad





India
May 11-29, 2015
Sponsored by the Southwest Region
Estimated Cost: $4,600
Credits: Students will receive 3 credit
hours for PSYC-253 Intro to Social
Psychology (Prerequisite: PSYC-101 or
SOCI-101)

India is one of the oldest civilizations on
earth. Visitors can experience a unique
culture that focuses on a peaceful
existence with others and nature.
Participants will visit India's "Golden
Triangle" of Delhi, Agra and Jaipur and
engage in various service learning
projects.

http://www.ivytech.edu/studyabroad/index.html

Questions……

ddickman@ivytech.edu
Life doesn't make any sense
without interdependence. We
need each other, and the
sooner we learn that, the
better for us all.
Erik Erikson