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
AP STATISTICS—COURSE SYLLABUS
2015-2016
Instructor:
Mr. Bill Blakely
Phone:
CELL:(269) 569-6530
SCHOOL: (269) 488-5020, ext. 1669 (voice mail only)
E-mail:
bblakely@gulllakecs.org
Course Description:
Statistics is the study of data. This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Statistics test
offered in May of each year and to earn college credit. The goal of the course is to develop an
understanding and appreciation of statistics, which is a rich and diverse topic. Students will be
expected to complete in class investigations along with out of class investigations to aid in the
learning process. Students will also be able to discuss topics such as methodology and inferences both
individually and in small groups [C4]. The following topics will be covered in AP Statistics:
1)
2)
3)
4)
Exploratory analysis by describing patterns and departures from patterns
Planning and conducting a study
Anticipating patterns using probability and simulation
Statistical inference
Content
Test Following Each Section
I.
Exploring Data: Describing patterns and
departures from patterns. [C2a]
Time Frame
72 minutes per block
Weight of AP exam
Blocks for topics
(20%–30%)
51 blocks
Resources
Resource/Chapter/Pages
Exploratory analysis of data makes use of graphical and
numerical techniques to study patterns and departures
from patterns. Emphasis should be placed on
interpreting information from graphical and numerical
displays and summaries.
A.
Constructing and interpreting
graphical displays of distributions of univariate data
(dotplot, stemplot, histogram, cumulative frequency
plot)
1.
Center and spread
2.
Clusters and gaps
3.
Outliers and other unusual features
4.
Shape
9 blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 50,62-63
Triola—Ch. 2, Pg. 42
2. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 52,62-63
Triola—Ch. 2, Pg. 61
3. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 51-52,62-63
Triola—Ch. 2, Pg. 42
4. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 51-52,62-63
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 85-86
B.
13 blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 5, Pg. 74,87-89
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 77-79
2. Bock—Ch. 5, Pg. 75-76,83,87-89
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 92-98
Summarizing distributions of univariate data
1.
Measuring center: median, mean
2.
Measuring spread: range, interquartile
range, standard deviation
3.
Measuring position: quartiles,
percentiles, standardized scores
(z-scores)
4.
Using boxplots
5.
The effect of changing units on
summary measures
C.
Comparing distributions of univariate data
(dotplots, back-to-back stemplots, parallel boxplots)
1.
Comparing center and spread: within
group, between group variation
2.
Comparing clusters and gaps
3.
Comparing outliers and other
unusual features
4.
Comparing shapes
3. Bock—Ch. 5, Pg. 75-76,103-104,87-89
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 110-113
4. Bock—Ch. 5, Pg. 77,87-89
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 120-124
5. Bock—Ch. 5, Pg. 87-89
8 blocks
D.
Exploring bivariate data
1.
Analyzing patterns in scatterplots
2.
Correlation and linearity
3.
Least-squares regression line
4.
Residual plots, outliers and
influential points
5.
Transformations to achieve linearity:
logarithmic and power transformations
10 blocks
E.
Exploring categorical data
1.
Frequency tables and bar charts
2.
Marginal and joint frequencies for twoway tables
3.
Conditional relative frequencies and
association
4.
Comparing distributions using bar
Charts
8 blocks
F.
AP Practice Test problems over each section and
complete Unit I. Also, problems will be given
throughout the unit on a daily or semi-daily basis.
II.
Sampling and Experimentation: Planning
and conducting a study. [C2b]
3 blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 49,62-63
Bock—Ch. 10, Pg. 224-225,244
Triola—Ch. 2, Pg. 68
2. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 49,50,62-63
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 127
3. Bock—Ch. 9, Pg. 203-207,212
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 122,124
4. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 50,62-63
Triola—Ch. 3, Pg. 124-125
1. Bock—Ch. 7, Pg. 142-146,158-160
Triola—Ch. 10, Pg. 516,519
2. Bock—Ch. 7, Pg. 142-146,158-160
Triola—Ch. 10, Pg. 518-524
3. Bock—Ch. 8, Pg. 170-172,186-188
Triola—Ch. 10, Pg. 541-547
4. Bock—Ch. 8, Pg. 169,186
Bock—Ch. 9, Pg. 198-199,211-213
Triola—Ch. 10, Pg. 549-552
5. Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 58-59,62-63
Triola—Ch. 10, Pg. 576-578
1. Bock—Ch. 3, Pg. 21-23,34-35
Triola—Ch. 2, Pg. 42-48
2. Bock—Ch. 3, Pg. 24-25,34-35
Triola—Ch. 4, Pg. 151-153
3. Bock—Ch. 3, Pg. 22-23,26-28,34-35
Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 47,62-63
Triola—Ch. 4, Pg. 169-171
4. Bock—Ch. 3, Pg. 23,34-35
Bock—Ch. 4, Pg. 47,62-63
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 13-14
Triola—Ch. 2, Pg. 52
Practice AP problems from 1997, 2002
and 2007 released tests.
(10%–15%)
41 blocks
Data must be collected according to a well-developed
plan if valid information on a conjecture is to be
obtained. This plan includes clarifying the question and
deciding upon a method of data collection and analysis.
A.
Overview of methods of data collection
1.
Census
2.
Sample survey
3.
Experiment
4.
Observational study
10 blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 12, Pg. 274-275,287
Triola—Ch. 2, Pg. 45
2. Bock—Ch. 12, Pg. 270-292
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 28
3. Bock—Ch. 13, Pg. 294,310-313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 21-31
4. Bock—Ch. 13, Pg. 293-294,310-313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 21,22
B.
Planning and conducting surveys
1.
Characteristics of a well-designed and
well-conducted survey
2.
Populations, samples and random
selection
3.
Sources of bias in sampling and
surveys
4.
Sampling methods, including simple
random sampling, stratified random
sample and cluster sampling
C.
Planning and conducting experiments
1.
Characteristics of a well-designed and
well-conducted experiment
2.
Treatments, control group experimental
units, random assignments and
replication
3.
Sources of bias and confounding,
including placebo effect and blinding
4.
Completely randomized design
5.
Randomized block design,
including matched pairs
design
D.
Generalizability of results and types of
conclusions that can be drawn from observational
studies, experiments and surveys
E.
AP Practice Test problems over each section and
complete Unit II. Also, problems will be given
throughout the unit on a daily or semi-daily basis.
III.
Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random
phenomena using probability and simulation. [C2c]
12 blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 12, Pg. 279-281,286-287
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 11-12
2. Bock—Ch. 12, Pg. 275-276,286-287
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 26-27
3. Bock—Ch. 12, Pg. 282-287
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 11-17,30
4. Bock—Ch. 12, Pg. 276-279
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 27-29
13 blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 13, Pg. 293-294,310-313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 21
2. Bock—Ch. 13, Pg. 294-297,310-313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 23-26
3. Bock—Ch. 13, Pg. 302-304,307,310313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 23-24
4. Bock—Ch. 13, Pg. 298-299,310-313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 25
5. Bock—Ch. 13, Pg. 304-306,310-313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 24
3 blocks
Bock—Ch. 12, Pg. 279,280,299-300,310313
Triola—Ch. 1, Pg. 33-35
Practice AP problems from 1997, 2002
and 2007 released tests.
3 blocks
(20%–30%)
45 Blocks
Probability is the tool used for anticipating what the
distribution of data should look like under a given model.
A.
B.
C.
Probability
1.
Interpreting probability, including longrun relative frequency interpretation
2.
“Law of Large Numbers” concept
3.
Addition rule, multiplication rule,
conditional probability and independence
4.
Discrete random variables and their
probability distributions, including
binomial and geometric
5.
Simulation of random behavior and
probability distributions
6.
Mean (expected value) and standard
deviation of a random variable, and
linear transformation of a random
variable
Combining independent random variables
1.
Notion of independence versus
dependence
2.
Mean and standard deviation for sums
and differences of independent random
variables
The normal distribution
1.
Properties of the normal distribution
12 Blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 15, Pg. 349,361-362
Triola—Ch. 4, Pg. 162
2. Bock—Ch. 14, Pg. 328-329,337-339
Triola—Ch. 4, Pg. 140-141
3. Bock—Ch. 15, Pg. 346-353,361-362
Triola—Ch. 4, Pg. 151-153,159-162
4. Bock—Ch. 17, Pg. 387-393,396-397
Triola—Ch. 5, Pg. 213-215,224
5. Bock—Ch. 16, Pg. 369,380-381
Triola—Ch. 4, Pg. 174-177
6. Bock—Ch. 16, Pg. 370-372,380-381
Triola—Ch. 5, Pg. 208-209,225-226
9 Blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 22, Pg. 495-497,506-507
Triola—Ch. 4, Pg. 162
2. Bock—Ch. 22, Pg. 498-507
Triola—Ch. 5, Pg. 204-205
10 Blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 6, Pg. 106-109,121-122
Triola—Ch. 6, Pg. 246-250
2.
3.
D.
Using tables of the normal distribution
The normal distribution as a model for
Measurements
Sampling distributions
1.
Sampling distribution of a sample
proportion
2.
Sampling distribution of a sample mean
3.
Central Limit Theorem
4.
Sampling distribution of a difference
between two independent sample
proportions
5.
Sampling distribution of a difference
between two independent sample means
6.
Simulation of sampling distributions
7.
t-distribution
8.
Chi-square distribution
E.
AP Practice Test problems over each section and
complete Unit III. Also problems will be given
throughout the unit on a daily or semi-daily basis.
IV.
Statistical Inference: Estimating population
parameters and testing hypotheses. [C2d]
2. Bock—Ch. 6, Pg. 113-114,121-122
Triola—Ch. 6, Pg. 250-253
3. Bock—Ch. 6, Pg. 115-117,121-122
Triola—Ch. 6, Pg. 263-265
11 Blocks
3 Block
1. Bock—Ch. 18, Pg. 413-416,427-428
Triola—Ch. 6, Pg. 270-273
2. Bock—Ch. 18, Pg. 417-418,427-428
Bock—Ch. 23, Pg. 523-524,538-540
Triola—Ch. 6, Pg. 274-275
3. Bock—Ch. 18, Pg. 419,427-428
Triola—Ch. 6, Pg. 280-281
4. Bock—Ch. 18, Pg. 417-418,427-428
Triola—Ch. 13, Pg. 695-699
5. Bock—Ch. 18, Pg. 417-418,427-428
6. Bock—Ch. 18, Pg. 425-428
7. Bock—Ch. 23, Pg. 522,538-540
Triola—Ch. 7, Pg. 350-351
8. Bock—Ch. 26, Pg. 608,625-627
Triola—Ch. 7, Pg. 364
Practice AP problems from 1997, 2002
and 2007 released tests
(30%–40%)
28 Blocks
Statistical inference guides the selection of appropriate
models
A.
Estimation (point estimators and confidence
intervals)
1.
Estimating population parameters and
margins of error
2.
Properties of point estimators, including
unbiasedness and variability
3.
Logic of confidence intervals, meaning of
confidence level and confidence
intervals, and properties of confidence
intervals
4.
Large sample confidence interval for a
proportion
5.
Large sample confidence interval for a
difference between two proportions
6.
Confidence interval for a mean
7. Confidence interval for a difference
12 Blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 19, Pg. 433-436,444-445
Triola—Ch. 7, Pg. 323-326
2. Bock—Ch. 19, Pg. 436-437,444-445
Triola—Ch. 7, Pg. 321-322
3. Bock—Ch. 19, Pg. 437-438,444-445
Triola—Ch. 7, Pg. 326-331
4. Bock—Ch. 19, Pg. 432-450
Triola—Ch. 7, Pg. 326-327
5. Bock—Ch. 25, Pg. 580-582,584-585
Triola—Ch. 9, Pg. 458
6. Bock—Ch. 27, Pg. 653,656
Triola—Ch. 7, Pg. 340-342,350-352
7. Bock—Ch. 24, Pg. 559,563-565,580-582
Triola—Ch. 9, Pg. 469-477
8. Bock—Ch. 27, Pg. 656
Triola—Ch. 10, Pg. 542
13 Blocks
1. Bock—Ch. 20, Pg. 451-468
Bock—Ch. 21, Pg. 482-483,48-490
Triola—Ch. 8, Pg. 387-394,398-400
2. Bock—Ch. 21, Pg. 474-479,488-490
Triola—Ch. 8, Pg. 408-409
3. Bock—Ch. 22, Pg. 495-507
Triola—Ch. 9, Pg. 456-458
4. Bock—Ch. 23, Pg. 532-535,538-540
Triola—Ch. 8, Pg. 418-430
5. Bock—Ch. 24, Pg. 548-561,563-565
between two means (unpaired and paired)
8.
B.
Confidence interval for the slope of a
least-squares regression line
Tests of significance
1.
Logic of significance testing, null and
alternative hypotheses; p-values;
one- and two-sided tests; concepts of
Type I and Type II errors; concept
of power
2.
Large sample test for a proportion
3.
Large sample test for a difference
between two proportions
4.
Test for a mean
5.
Test for a difference between two means
(unpaired and paired)
6.
Chi-square test for goodness of fit,
homogeneity of proportions, and
independence (one- and two-way tables)
7.
Test for the slope of a least-squares
regression line
C.
AP Practice Test problems over each section and
complete Unit IV. Also, problems will be given
throughout the unit on a daily or semi-daily basis.
Triola—Ch. 9, Pg. 475-477
6. Bock—Ch. 26, Pg. 607-612,625-627
Triola—Ch. 8, Pg. 436-440
7. Bock—Ch. 27, Pg. 638-643,655-657
Triola—Ch. 10, Pg. 544-551
3 Blocks
Practice AP problems from 1997, 2002
and 2007 released tests.
Course Objectives:
1)
2)
3)
5)
Students will understand the AP Statistics topics.
Students will take the Statistics AP test with confidence.
Students will pass the AP test with at least a 3
Students will be prepared for a college curriculum of Statistics.
Grading Scale:
93-100
90-92
87-89
A
AB+
83-86
80-82
77-79
B
BC+
73-76
70-72
67-69
C
CD+
63-66
60-62
0-59
D
DE
Grading Policy:
To determine a final letter grade, the following weighted grade system will be used:
 Test/Quizzes/Projects 80%
 Homework/Class work 20%
The Trimester grade will be composed of the marking period grade worth 80%, and a final exam worth 20%. A
student must receive at least a 60% for his/her trimester grade to receive credit in this course.
Grading Policy (continued):
*Evidence of cheating will result in a zero for the entire project/quiz/test. The following constitute cheating:
 Copying out of the back of the book
 Copying the work of another person
 Allowing someone to copy your work
 Anything else that I think is dishonest
Test and Quizzes:



One to three quizzes per unit will be given.
A comprehensive test will be given at the end of each unit. Each test will be weighted the same.
There will be test and quizzes where a calculator will not be allowed.
Practice AP Quizzes: There will be a “practice AP test” related to the topics that have been taught in class. These
will count as a homework assignment but will not be dropped. Do not fret over these because they will have little
weight in the grades and will be graded on the AP scale (i.e., 1 – 5 point scale)
Homework and Quizzes: Homework will be turned in every Friday. In addition, there will be
homework checks given on other days each week. There will be NO makeup of missed work due to
an unexcused absence or late assignment. I will drop your lowest homework check each trimester. -
Mathematical Tasks: In alignment with the Common Core Curriculum, students will be asked
to complete mathematical tasks. They will be assessed in different ways, depending on the
nature of the task.
AP STATISTICS SOURCES
Annenberg/CPB. (1989) Against All Odds: Inside Statistics, 26 thirty minutes. Washington, D.C.: The
Annenberg/CPB Collection. Videocassettes. (800)LEARNER. www.learner.org
Bock, Velleman, De Veaux (2007). Stats Modeling The World. Boston: Pearson Education
Bock, Velleman, De Veaux (2007). AP* Statistics Test Prep Series for Stats: Modeling the World. Boston:
Pearson Education
Bock, Velleman, De Veaux (2007). Teacher’s Solutions Manual for Stats: Modeling the World. Boston:
Pearson Education
Errthum, Mastromatteo, O’Connor, Scheaffer (1999). Exploring Projects. New York: Dale Seymour
Publications
Hopfensperger, Kranendonk, Scheaffer (1999). Probability Through Data. New York: Dale Seymour
Publications
Minitab 16. Loaded on Gull Lake High School Server. State College, PA.
Mulekar (2012). Cracking the AP Statistics Exam. New York: The Princeton Review
Sternstein (2000). Barron’s How To Prepare For The AP Statistics Exam. New York: Barron’s Educational
Services
Texas Instruments TI-83, TI-84 and TI-nspire graphing calculators [C5]
The College Board. www.apcentral.collegeboard.com
The College Board (1998). Released Exam AP Statistics. New York: College Entrance Examination Board
and Educational Testing Service
The College Board (2002). Statistics Released Exam. New York: College Entrance Examination Board and
Educational Testing Service
The College Board (2008). 2007 AP Statistics Released Exam. New York: College Entrance Examination
Board and Educational Testing Service
Triola (2006). Elementary Statistics. Boston: Pearson Education
YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES AND EXPECTATIONS
1)
2)
3)
4)
Concentrate and give your best effort. Attend class. Complete your work on time.
Read each lesson
Ask for help
Pet Peeves
-slurping of a straw
-be distracted or cause others to be distracted with your technology
-line up to leave class
-listening to people eating
-show disrespect by talking at inappropriate times
-lie
5) Wear Proper Clothing
AP STATISTICS PROJECT
[(C2a,b,c,d)] [(C3)] [(C4)] [(C5)]
The project listed below will meet the requirement for the course. You may also select a project from an
outside source including, but not limited to, textbooks authored by Bock, Triola or Yates. You may also
select a project from the Errthum project book.
PROJECT: Students will design and conduct an experiment to investigate the effects of response bias in
surveys. They may choose the topic for their surveys, but they must design their experiment so that it can
answer at least one of the following questions:






Can the wording of the question create response bias?
Can voluntary response create response bias?
Can convenience sampling create response bias?
Can subjects respond differently, simply because they are part of an experiment (see Hawthorne effect)?
Do the characteristics of the interviewer create response bias (see Rosenthall effect)?
Does anonymity change the responses to sensitive questions?
PROPOSAL: The proposal should:



Describe the topic and state which type of bias is being investigated
Describe how to obtain subjects (minimum sample size is 50). Please contact me before contacting Ms.
Quartermaine.
Describe what questions will be and how they will be asked, including how to incorporate direct control,
blocking and randomization.
WRITTEN REPORT: The written report should include a title in the form of a question and the following
sections (clearly labeled).





Introduction: What form of response bias was investigated? Why was the topic chosen for the survey?
Methodology: Describe how the experiment was conducted and justify why the design was effective. This will
be very similar to the proposal section above.
Results: Present the data in both tables and graphs in such a way that conclusions can be easily made. Make
sure to label the graphs/tables clearly and consistently. These graphs can be shown in either EXCEL or
MINITAB.
Conclusions: What conclusions can be drawn from the experiment? Be specific. Were any problems
encountered during the project? What could be done different if the experiment were to be repeated? What
was learned from the project?
The original proposal
ORAL PRESENTATION: Members will participate equally. This project may be completed either individually
or in groups of up to 3 members.
Calculator Policy [C5]
Each student is expected to bring to the exam a graphing calculator with statistical capabilities. The
computational capabilities should include standard statistical univariate and bivariate summaries,
through linear regression. The graphical capabilities should include common univariate and bivariate
displays such as histograms, boxplots, and scatterplots.

You can bring two calculators to the exam.

The calculator memory will not be cleared but you may only use the memory to store
programs, not notes.

For the exam, you're not allowed to access any information in your graphing calculators or
elsewhere if it's not directly related to upgrading the statistical functionality of older graphing
calculators to make them comparable to statistical features found on newer models. The only
acceptable upgrades are those that improve the computational functionalities and/or graphical
functionalities for data you key into the calculator while taking the examination. Unacceptable
enhancements include, but aren't limited to, keying or scanning text or response templates
into the calculator.

During the exam, you can't use minicomputers, pocket organizers, electronic writing pads,
or calculators with QWERTY (i.e., typewriter) keyboards.
The list of calculators approved for AP Calculus can also be used for the AP Statistics Exam.
The Preferred Calculator recommended by the instructor of this class is TI-84, TI-89, TI
n-spire, n-spire CAS or n-spire CX.
The AP Examination
DATE: Thursday, May 12, 2016 at 12:00 PM (noon)
COST: $92, with $20 non-refundable registration fee due in February
The examination is 3 hours in length. It is divided into two sections, each taking 90 minutes.
Section I is a multiple-choice section that tests proficiency in wide variety of topics. It contains 40
questions and is 90 minutes long. Multiple-choice scores are based on the number of questions
answered correctly. Points are not deducted for incorrect answers, and no points are awarded for
unanswered questions. Because no points are deducted for incorrect answers, students are encouraged
to answer all multiple-choice questions.
Section II is a free-response section requiring the students to demonstrate the ability to solve
problems involving a more extended chain of reasoning within 90 minutes. In the free-response
section of the AP Statistics Exam, students are asked to answer five questions and complete an
investigative task. Each question is designed to be answered in approximately 12 minutes. The longer
investigative task is designed to be answered in approximately 30 minutes.
Formula pages and tables are given to you to use the entire tests as well as your calculator may
be used the entire test.