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1
Course Title: World History/Law
Date Adopted: September 4, 1996
Department: Social Science
UC/CSU Requirement: Yes
Pre-Requisite: None
Fulfills CSF Requirement: Yes
Length of Course: Two Semesters
Semester Units/Credits: 5
Fulfills H/S Graduation Credit As:
Required X Elective
Grade Level: 10
Course No.: 16640
I.
Course Description
In this course, students examine major turning points in the shaping of the modern world,
from the late eighteenth century to the present. The course will begin with an examination of
current world issues, and will then proceed to connect with students past learning by studying
the rise of democratic ideas. Other major topics will include: The Industrial Revolution, the
rise of Imperialism and Colonialism, World War I, Totalitarianism in the 20th Century, the
Second World War, and Nationalism in the contemporary world. The world history/law
course meets the same criteria as world history with the difference being an in-depth emphasis
on the events which shaped current day u.s. law and government.
Due to the controversial nature of some issues covered in this course, it will be taught
with strict adherence to Board Policy 6144, which provides for a balanced approach in all
controversial issues.
II.
Rationale
The students of the Antelope Valley High School District will spend their adult lives in the
twenty-first century. This curriculum emphasizes the importance of studying major historical
events of the twentieth century in depth as opposed to superficial skimming of enormous
amounts of material and often unnecessary repetition of material. The emphasis on the law
and government structure in the cultures and time periods examined is designed to provide the
student with a better understanding of the development of U.S. government and law.
III.
Goals, Objectives, and Performance Indicators
UNRESOLVED PROBLEMS OF THE MODERN WORLD
1.0 GOAL: Students will develop an awareness of current world issues and
problems.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
2
1.1
Obj: Students will develop an understanding of the major political,
economic, social, cultural, and environmental issues and
problems facing the modern world.
**1.1.9:
1.1.1:
Students will describe the problem of famine in Africa in
terms of environmental and political causes.
1.1.2:
Students will analyze the Latin American debt problem,
and discuss its impact on the growth and development of
the region.
1.1.3:
Students will discuss the problem of war and terrorism in
the Middle East and Northern Ireland.
1.1.4:
Students will identify major environmental problems
facing the planet, e.g., the destruction of the Amazon rain
forests, acid rain, depletion of the ozone layer, etc.
1.1.5:
Students will debate the pros and cons of technological
development at the expense of social and cultural stability.
1.1.6:
Students will evaluate the need to spend vast amounts of a
nations wealth and resources in the development of
nuclear arsenals.
1.1.7:
Students will identify current struggles around the world
for human rights and democracy, e.g., China, Poland, and
the Soviet Union.
1.1.8:
Students will identify world organizations which seek
solutions to the world's problems.
Students will examine current world issues which have an impact
on u.s. law and government structure.
CONNECTING THE PAST LEARNING: THE RISE OF DEMOCRATIC IDEAS
2.0 GOAL:
Given primary and secondary historical sources, students will develop an
understanding of the origins and developments of democratic ideas.
2.1
Obj: Students will understand how the moral and ethical principles of
Judaism and Christianity have influenced Western Democratic
thought.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
3
**
2.1.1:
Students will describe Mosaic law with its emphasis on the
value of human life.
2.1.2:
Students will discuss Ethical Monotheism with its
emphasis on ethics and moral behavior.
2.1.3:
Students will explain the importance of Old Testament Prophets
in Hebrew thought with reference to the ideas of equality
and measuring up to a standard.
2.1.4:
Students will compare Hebrew and Christian ideas
relating to human dignity, equality, and community.
2.1.5:
Students will evaluate the importance of Judeo-Christian
ideas to modern democratic societies.
*
2.1.6
Students will explain the importance of Hammurabi's
Code.
*
2.1.7
Students will define, discuss and analyze the idea of
natural law.
2.2
Obj: Students will become aware of the Greek and Roman
contribution to democracy.
2.2.1:
Students will compare the democratic reforms of Draco,
Solon, Pisistratus, and Cleisthenes.
2.2.2:
Students will describe democratic society in Athens.
2.2.3:
Students will compare the strengths and weaknesses of
democratic Athens and totalitarian Sparta.
** 2.2.4:
Students will discuss the influence of Greek philosophy on
democratic ideas to include the writings of Plato,
Aristotle, and other important Greek philosophers.
2.2.5:
Students will chart the organization of the Roman
Republic, and will compare that organization with
republican government in the United States.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
4
** 2.2.6:
Students will discuss the influence of Cicero and other significant
Roman statesmen.
* 2.2.7:
Students will examine the Justinian code and its impact on the
development of Western law.
2.3
Obj: Students will demonstrate a knowledge of Enlightenment thought
and its influence on democratic ideas. The ideas of the
Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Reason.
2.3.1:
Students will define the terms Enlightenment, rationalism,
and the Age of Reason.
2.3.2:
Students will describe how Enlightenment thinkers
viewed the world around them.
2.3.3:
Students will compare the ideas of Thomas Hobbes and
John Locke.
2.3.4:
Students will compare the ideas of Baron de Montesquieu,
Jean Jacques Rosseau, and Voltaire.
** 2.3.5:
2.4
Students will compare and analyze the ideas of St.
Augustine, Dante, and Machiavelli.
Obj: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the development
of democracy in England.
2.4.1:
Students will describe the developments of Grand and
Petit juries during the reign of Henry I and Henry II.
2.4.2:
Students will list the provisions of the Magna Carta.
2.4.3:
Students will outline the development of Parliament and
the growth of Common Law.
2.4.4:
Students will explain the conflict between Parliament and
the English Monarch, which resulted in the English
Revolution.
2.4.5:
Students will identify the contents of the Petition of
Rights.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
5
2.4.6:
Students will discuss Oliver Cromwell's attempts to
establish a constitution for England.
2.4.7:
Students will analyze the importance of the following: the
Habeas Corpus Act, the Bill of Rights, and the Act of
Toleration.
2.4.8:
Students will describe the supremacy of Parliament over
the monarch, and the development of the Cabinet and the
Prime Minister.
* 2.4.9:
2.5
2.6
Students will discuss the effect of British law on the current U.S.
legal system.
Obj: Students will develop an awareness of the role played by the
United States in the development of democracy.
2.5.1:
Students will analyze the contents of the Declaration of
Independence.
2.5.2:
Students will list the Bill of Rights in the U.S.
Constitution.
2.5.3:
Students will describe the separation of powers
determined by the U.S. Constitution.
Obj: Students will develop an understanding of the nature of
democracy, and its development in France.
2.6.1:
Students will outline the main events of the French
Revolution.
2.6.2:
Students will describe the meeting of the Estates-General.
2.6.3:
Students will explain the importance of Bastille Day.
2.6.4:
Students will identify and determine the significance of
the following: Law of the Fourth of August, Declaration
of the Rights of Man, and the Civil and Constitution of the
Clergy.
2.6.5:
Students will discuss and evaluate reasons for the failure
of French democracy in terms of the emergence of the
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
6
Reign of Terror, and the Coup d'etate staged by Napoleon
Bonaparte.
** 2.6.6:
Students will compare the French basis of law with that of
current day U.S. law.
THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
3.0 GOAL: Given primary and secondary historical sources, students will develop an
understanding of the economic, political, social, cultural, and scientific
developments of the Industrial Era.
3.1
Obj: Students will become aware of economic changes associated with
the Industrial Revolution.
3.1.1:
Students will define the Five Factors of Production, and
explain why they are necessary for the industrial process.
3.1.2:
Students will relate the Agricultural Revolution to
industrialization in Great Britain.
3.1.3:
Students will outline the mechanization of the cotton
textile industry in Great Britain.
3.1.4:
Students will discuss the importance of steam, iron, and
coal to the industrial process.
Students will describe the factory system.
3.1.5:
3.1.6:
Students will outline developments in transportation and
communication.
3.1.7:
Students will explain the importance of electric power and
light.
3.1.8:
Students will define the following economic concepts:
Industrial Capitalism, Division of Labor, Interchangeable
Parts, Assembly Line, Corporations, Monopolies, and the
Business Cycle.
3.1.9:
Students will define the terms Laissez-Faire and Free
Enterprize, and will relate these to the ideas of Adam
Smith.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
7
3.1.10: Students will analyze the spread of industrial development to the
rest of the world.
3.1.11: Students will evaluate the idea that technology equals progress.
3.2
3.3
Obj: Students will develop a knowledge of political developments
related to the Industrial Revolution.
3.2.1:
Students will discuss the role the British government
played in Industrialization.
3.2.2:
Students will describe the response of the working classes
towards economic change, e.g., machine breaking, strikes,
and labor unions.
3.2.3:
Students will chart the British governments attempts at
economic reform through legislation.
3.2.4:
Students will define the term Political Liberalism.
3.2.5:
Students will compare the legislative accomplishments
and ideas of the British Prime Ministers Desraeli and
Gladstone.
3.2.6:
Students will analyze the ideas of Karl Marx, and the
socialist response to industrialization.
Obj: Students will develop an understanding of the social
consequences of industrialization.
3.3.1:
Students will discuss the working conditions in the
factories.
3.3.2:
Students will describe the living conditions in industrial
cities, and governments attempts to improve these
conditions, e.g., sanitation, building codes, and a police
force.
3.3.3:
Students will explain the ideas of Thomas R. Malthus.
3.3.4:
Students will compare the impact of industrialization on
women and children.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
8
3.4
3.3.5:
Students will compare and contrast the daily lives of the
middle and working classes.
3.3.6:
Students will outline the growing influence of public
education.
3.3.7:
Students will summarize the social criticism of Charles
Dickens.
Obj: Students will develop an awareness of cultural and scientific
development during the Industrial Era.
3.4.1:
Students will chart the development of leisure and
cultural activities, e.g., sports, concert halls, museums,
libraries, and public parks.
3.4.2:
Students will outline the basic discoveries of: Pasteur,
Einstein, Pavlov, Mendeleyev, Mendel, Jenner, Ranke, the
Curies, Darwin, and Freud.
3.4.3:
Students will describe the Romantic movement in
literature, art and music, and will list the names and
major works of Romantic authors, artists, and musicians.
THE RISE OF IMPERIALISM AND COLONIALISM
4.0 GOAL: Given primary and secondary historical sources, students will develop an
understanding of European Imperialism and Colonialism from 1789 to
1914.
4.1
Obj: Students will understand the causes for European Imperialism
and Colonialism.
4.1.1:
Students will define the terms Imperialism and
Colonialism.
4.1.2:
Students will describe the common process by which the
European powers asserted Imperialistic control over other
parts of the world.
4.1.3:
Students
will
compare
the
causes
of
Imperialism/Colonialism: the need for raw materials, the
need for new markets, the investing of surplus capital, an
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
9
outlet for population, nationalism, missionary motives,
and the concept of the "white man's burden."
4.2.
4.3
Obj: Students will develop a knowledge of European Imperialism and
Colonialism in Africa.
4.2.1:
Students will outline French imperialism in Morocco,
Algeria, Tunisia, French West Africa, Madagascar, and
French Equatorial Africa.
4.2.2:
Students will discuss British imperialism in West Africa,
Egypt, Sudan, East Africa, and South Africa.
4.2.3:
Students will determine the importance of the Suez Canal.
4.2.4:
Students will explain the causes and consequences of the
Boer War.
4.2.5:
Students will compare Italian, Belgian, German,
Portuguese, and Spanish involvement in Africa.
Obj: Students will develop a knowledge of British Imperialism /
Colonialism in India.
4.3.1:
Students will chart the establishment of British economic
and political control over India.
4.3.2:
Students will discuss the Indian Mutiny of 1857.
4.3.3:
Students will describe British rule after Queen Victoria
was proclaimed Empress of India in 1877.
4.3.4:
Students will outline the rise of Indian nationalism, and
the independence movement led by Jawaharlal Nehru and
Mohandas Gandhi.
4.3.5:
Students will evaluate Gandhi's method of non-violent
resistance to oppose British rule in India.
** 4.3.6:
Students will summarize the influence of Henry David
Thoreau and Gandhi on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
10
4.4
4.5
Obj: Students will become aware of European Imperialism /
Colonialism in East Asia.
4.4.1:
Students will discuss Japan's decision to end its long
period of isolation, and its successful attempts at
industrialization.
4.4.2:
Students will define the terms Extraterritoriality and
Unequal Treaties.
4.4.3:
Students will describe the economic partition of China by
the Imperialistic powers.
4.4.4:
Students will assess the consequences of the Tiaping
Rebellion in China.
4.4.5:
Students will explain the causes and consequences of the
Opium wars in China.
4.4.6:
Students will determine the causes and consequences of
the Sino-Japanese War.
Obj: Students will become knowledgeable of U.S. involvement in Latin
America.
4.5.1:
Students will explain the causes and consequences of the
Spanish-American War.
4.5.2:
Students will discuss the construction and importance of
the Panama Canal.
4.5.3:
Students will outline U.S. involvement in Mexico and
Venezuela.
4.5.4:
Students will describe economic imperialism.
WORLD WAR I AND ITS CONSEQUENCES
5.0 GOAL: Given primary and secondary historical sources, students will develop an
understanding of the causes, developments, and consequences of WWI.
5.1
Obj: Students will understand the major causes, and sequence of
events leading to total war in Europe.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
11
5.2
5.3
5.1.1:
Students will compare the four major causes of WWI:
Nationalism, Imperialism, Militarism, and Alliances.
5.1.2:
Students will explain why the Balkens of South-eastern
Europe was known as the "Powder Keg."
5.1.3:
Students will outline the events beginning with the
assassination of the Archduke Francis Ferdinand, and
ending with the total outbreak of war in Europe.
Obj: Students will become aware of innovations which made WWI the
first modern war.
5.2.1:
Students will explain why WWI was an industrialized
war.
5.2.2:
Students will compare the use of the following weapons:
machine gun, tank, airplane, submarine, and poison gas.
5.2.3:
Students will describe the belligerent use of propaganda
during the war.
Obj: Students will become knowledgeable of the major developments
of WWI.
5.3.1:
Students will list the Central and Allied Powers, and will
discuss the advantages each side possessed.
5.3.2:
Students will describe the importance of the following
battles: The Marne, Tannenberg, Gallipoli, Jutland, and
Verdun.
5.3.3:
Students will explain why and how the war was fought in
the trenches.
5.3.4:
Students will discuss the strategy of attrition.
5.3.5:
Students will outline the involvement of the U.S. during
WWI, including its initial opposition to the war, its
reaction to the sinking of the Lusitania, Germany's use of
unrestricted submarine warfare, the Zimmerman
telegram, and Wilson's 14 points.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
12
5.3.6:
5.4
Students will outline Russia's involvement in the war, and
will discuss the impact of the Russian Revolution.
Obj: Students will develop an understanding of the consequences of
WWI.
5.4.1:
Students will discuss the costs of the war in terms of
human life and property.
5.4.2:
Students will analyze the Treaty of Versailles, and will
describe its impact on Germany.
5.4.3:
Students will identify changes to the European map
brought about by the victors of WWI.
5.4.4:
Students will describe the League of Nations.
5.4.5:
Students will explain the human tragedy of the Armenian
Genocide.
5.4.6:
Students will describe the air of disillusionment existing in
Europe and the U.S. after WWI.
TOTALITARIANISM IN THE MODERN WORLD: NAZI GERMANY AND STALINIST
RUSSIA
6.0 GOAL: Students will develop an understanding of totalitarianism in the modern
world.
6.1
Obj: Students will understand the rise of the Nazi party in German.
6.1.1:
Students will describe the weakness and unpopularity of
the Weimar Republic.
6.1.2:
Students will discuss the economic crisis facing Germany
after WWI.
6.1.3:
Students will explain the reasons for Hitler's rise to power
within the Nazi party, and among the German people.
6.1.4:
Students will compare the differences in Nazi strategy
between the Munich uprising, and the elections of 1930
and 1933.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
13
6.1.5:
6.2
6.3
Students will define Hitler's concept of the Master Race,
and explain why this idea helped increase the popularity
of the Nazi party.
Obj: Students will develop a knowledge of the implementation of Nazi
rule in Germany.
6.2.1:
Students will outline the systematic suppression of human
rights and freedoms in Germany during the 1930's.
6.2.2:
Students will discuss the early use of concentration camps
for the suppression of political opposition, and the
persecution of "unwanted elements" in society, e.g.,
gypsies, and homosexuals.
6.2.3:
Students will explain the function of the Gestapo, or Nazi
secret police.
Obj: Students will become aware of Hitler's final solution.
6.3.1:
Students will describe the highly developed Jewish culture
existing in Germany during the 1930's.
6.3.2:
Students will discuss the Nazi use of propaganda and
racism in order to stir up hatred toward the Jews, e.g.,
Krystallnacht.
6.3.3:
Students will analyze the Nazi's use of bureaucratic social
organization and modern technology, to gather, classify,
and eradicate the human victims of the holocaust.
6.3.4:
Students will explain life and death in a Nazi
concentration camp.
6.3.5:
Students will relate examples of rebellion to Hitler's final
solution, e.g., the Warsaw ghetto riots, and the actions of
Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Raoul Wallenberg.
6.3.6:
Students will evaluate the decision of many western
nations, the United States included, to refuse the entry
into their countries of Jewish refugees fleeing Germany.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
14
6.4
6.5
Obj: Students will develop an understanding of Czarist Russia and the
Russian Revolution.
6.4.1:
Students will discuss the excesses of the Czar's power, e.g.,
the secret police, censorship, the imprisonment of
dissidents.
6.4.2:
Students will outline Russia's failed attempts at reform
and revolution.
6.4.3:
Students will analyze the relationships between Russia's
weak industry, WWI, and the outbreak of the Revolution.
6.4.4:
Students will outline the Bolshevik rise to power under
the leadership of V.I. Lenin.
6.4.5:
Students will describe the policies of V.I. Lenin from 1917
to 1924.
6.4.6:
Students will compare the ideas of Leon Trotsky and
Joseph Stalin, and will describe the struggle for power
between the two.
Obj: Students will understand the brutality of the Stalin dictatorship.
6.5.1:
Students will discuss Stalin's economic policy, including
his five-year plan.
6.5.2:
Students will explain how Stalin's economic plans were
promoted at the cost of human rights.
6.5.3:
Students will describe the following examples of
totalitarian government in Russia: forced collectivization
in agriculture, the murder of Kulaks, government created
famine in the Ukraine, Stalin's political purges,
executions, and deportations.
WORLD WAR II: ITS CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES
7.0 GOAL: Given primary and secondary historical sources, students will develop an
understanding of the causes, major developments, and consequences of
the Second World War.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
15
7.1
7.2
Obj: Students will understand the causes and major developments of
the Second World War.
7.1.1:
Students will outline the major events leading to the
German invasion of Poland in 1939. The Anschluss, the
Sudeten crisis, and the Munich appeasement should be
included.
7.1.2:
Students will list the Axis and Allied powers during
WWII.
7.1.3:
Students will explain the importance of the Hitler-Stalin
Pact, and describe its impact on Poland, Latvia,
Lithuania, and Estonia.
7.1.4:
Students will chart the major German offensives
including: the invasions of Poland, Scandinavia and the
low countries, France, Eastern Europe, the
Mediterranean, North Africa, and Russia.
7.1.5:
Students will define the term Blitzkrieg.
7.1.6:
Students will describe the Evacuation of Dunkirk, and the
French Resistance.
7.1.7:
Students will determine the significance of the Battle of
Britain.
7.1.8:
Students will discuss the involvement of the United States
in WWII prior to declaring war on Germany.
7.1.9:
Students will analyze two major turning points of WWII:
the Battle of Stalingrad, and the Invasion of Normandy.
Obj: Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the War in the Pacific.
7.2.1:
Students will outline Japan's prewar expansion including
the conquests of Manchuria and China.
7.2.2:
Students will analyze the Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
16
7.3
7.2.3:
Students will identify the areas of Asia and the Pacific
controlled by Japan during WWII.
7.2.4:
Students will describe the significance of the following
battles in the Pacific: Coral Sea, Midway Islands, Guadal
Canal, Leyte Gulf, and Iwo Jima.
7.2.5:
Students will evaluate President Truman's decisions to
drop atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima
and Nagasaki.
Obj: Students will become aware of the consequences of the Second
World War, and how these consequences have shaped the
modern world in which we live.
7.3.1:
Students will describe the costs of the war in terms of
human life and property damage.
7.3.2:
Students will compare the Tehran, Yalta, and Potsdam
conferences, and will determine the effect these
conferences had on the post war communist world.
7.3.3:
Students will define and discuss the importance of the
Marshall Plan and the Truman Doctrine.
7.3.4:
Students will analyze the economic recoveries of Germany
and Japan.
7.3.5:
Students will outline the major events of the Cold War
including: the lowering of the "Iron Curtain," the
creation of East Germany and the Berlin Wall, the
Korean War, the Hungarian Revolt, and the Vietnam
War.
7.3.6:
Students will discuss the creation of the United Nations,
and will evaluate the usefulness of the organization in the
maintaining of world peace.
7.3.7:
Students will identify the member nations of the Warsaw
Pact and NATO.
NATIONALISM IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
17
8.0 GOAL: Students will develop an understanding of contemporary nationalism in
Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.
8.1
Obj: Students will understand how the Soviet Union and China
became world powers
8.1.1:
Students will compare the foreign and domestic policies of
Stalin, Khrushchev, and Brezhnev.
8.1.2:
Students will discuss the reasons why the Soviet Union has
sought predominance in Eastern Europe.
8.1.3:
Students will describe the summit conferences between
the Soviet Union and the United States, and will discuss
the impact of Detente.
8.1.4:
Students will explain the Soviet Union's involvement in
Afghanistan.
8.1.5:
Students will analyze the current reform movement lead
by Gorbachev, and discuss its impact on the rest of the
communist world.
8.1.6:
Students will describe the defeat of Chinese Nationalists
by the Communists in 1949.
8.1.7:
Students will discuss the conflicts resulting from China's
attempt to promote economic growth while creating a
classless society.
8.1.8:
Students will analyze Chinese cultural and economic
development since the death of Mao Tse-Tung in 1976.
8.1.9:
Students will give reasons for the break in relations
between the Soviet Union and China in the 1960's.
8.1.10: Students will evaluate the importance of communist idealogy in
the development of the Soviet Union and China.
8.2
Obj: Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the turbulent Middle
East, and the key roles played by Egypt and Israel.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
18
8.3
8.2.1:
Students will describe the causes of conflict in the Middle
East, e.g., nationalism, religious conflict, oil, etc.
8.2.2:
Students will analyze the problem of terrorism in the
Middle East.
8.2.3:
Students will compare the differences between the Sunni
and Shiite Muslims.
8.2.4:
Students will discuss the role of Islamic Fundamentalism
as a response against western-style modernization.
8.2.5:
Students will compare Egyptian independence and the
rule of Gamal Abdel Nasser, with the creation of the state
of Israel and the rule of David Ben-Gurion.
8.2.6:
Students will explain the causes and consequences of the
Six Day War of 1967, and the Arab-Israeli War of 1973.
8.2.7:
Students will describe the role OPEC has played in the
Middle East.
8.2.8:
Students will define the Palestinian problem, and discuss
the impact of the PLO in the Middle East.
8.2.9:
Students will evaluate the importance of the Camp David
Agreement between Begin and Sadat.
Obj: Students will become ware of post WWII African nationalism.
8.3.1:
Students will compare and contrast the independence
movements of the following nations: Ghana, Kenya, Zaire,
and Nigeria.
8.3.2:
Students will describe the path to independence taken by
the French colonies.
8.3.3:
Students will discuss the process of independence in
Rhodesia.
8.3.4:
Students will analyze the Apartheid system of South
Africa.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
19
8.3.5:
8.4
Students will describe the foreign and domestic opposition
to Apartheid.
Obj: Students will demonstrate an understanding of modern Mexico
and Brazil.
8.4.1:
Students will identify the countries of Central and South
America.
8.4.2:
Students will outline the events of the Mexican Revolution
1910-1920.
8.4.3:
Students will list the presidents of Mexico and will briefly
describe each administration.
8.4.4:
Students will describe the Mexican political system.
8.4.5:
Students will discuss Mexico's population crisis.
8.4.6:
Students will analyze the Mexican economy and
determine the impact oil discoveries have had on it.
8.4.7:
Students will describe the relationship between the U.S.
and Mexico, and will discus the problems of immigration,
drugs, and water use.
8.4.8:
Students will identify the major geographic features of
Brazil.
8.4.9:
Students will describe Brazil's large immigrant
population, and the cultural diversity it creates.
8.4.10: Students will analyze the Brazilian economy and will determine
its relationship with Brazilian politics.
8.4.11: Students will determine the economic and environmental impact
of the destruction of the tropical rain forests.
9.0 GOAL: Students will continue to develop enhanced oral and written communication
skills and critical thinking, reasoning and analytical skills.
9.1
Obj: Students will practice oral communication skills.
WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996
20
* 9.1.1:
Students will practice effective listening in group and
individual situations.
* 9.1.2: Students will engage in classroom discussions.
* 9.1.3:
9.2
Students will tailor oral presentations to specific
audiences and for specific purposes, for example, a closing
argument in a mock trial.
Obj: Students will practice critical thinking, reasoning, and analytical
skills.
* 9.2.1:
** 9.2.2:
Students will analyze, evaluate, interpret and compare
persuasive arguments.
Students will analyze and draw conclusions from trial cases, laws
and legislation, trial verdicts, and mock trial scripts.
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WORLD HISTORY/LAW - SEPTEMBER 4, 1996