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Imperialism in China--notes
Opium Wars (1839-1843)--China wanted to remain isolated from European influence but the Europeans
wanted Chinese goods. The British smuggled large quantities of opium into China and the Chinese quickly
became hooked on the drug and bought large quantities. The Chinese government tried to forbid the sale of
opium which sparked the Opium Wars. The Chinese were forced to open their ports to trade. European nations
and Japan gained areas where only they could trade, called “spheres of influence”. An internal rebellion in
China called the Taiping Rebellion was trying to establish a kingdom where no one would live in poverty. This
rebellion, plus the foreign influence, put pressure on the imperial government to reform.
Boxer Rebellion (1899)—Fed up with foreigners in their country, a secret society of martial artists (fighters)
rebelled. They called themselves the Righteous and Harmonious Fists (called Boxers by Europeans because of
their fighting skills). They killed Europeans and Chinese Christians but were defeated by multinational forces
which led to more open trade with China. After this rebellion, other nations including the US demanded equal
trading rights in China, called an “open door policy”.
Imperialism in China--notes
Opium Wars (1839-1843)--China wanted to remain isolated from European influence but the Europeans
wanted Chinese goods. The British smuggled large quantities of opium into China and the Chinese quickly
became hooked on the drug and bought large quantities. The Chinese government tried to forbid the sale of
opium which sparked the Opium Wars. The Chinese were forced to open their ports to trade. European nations
and Japan gained areas where only they could trade, called “spheres of influence”. An internal rebellion in
China called the Taiping Rebellion was trying to establish a kingdom where no one would live in poverty. This
rebellion, plus the foreign influence, put pressure on the imperial government to reform.
Boxer Rebellion (1899)—Fed up with foreigners in their country, a secret society of martial artists (fighters)
rebelled. They called themselves the Righteous and Harmonious Fists (called Boxers by Europeans because of
their fighting skills). They killed Europeans and Chinese Christians but were defeated by multinational forces
which led to more open trade with China. After this rebellion, other nations including the US demanded equal
trading rights in China, called an “open door policy”.
Imperialism in China--notes
Opium Wars (1839-1843)--China wanted to remain isolated from European influence but the Europeans
wanted Chinese goods. The British smuggled large quantities of opium into China and the Chinese quickly
became hooked on the drug and bought large quantities. The Chinese government tried to forbid the sale of
opium which sparked the Opium Wars. The Chinese were forced to open their ports to trade. European nations
and Japan gained areas where only they could trade, called “spheres of influence”. An internal rebellion in
China called the Taiping Rebellion was trying to establish a kingdom where no one would live in poverty. This
rebellion, plus the foreign influence, put pressure on the imperial government to reform.
Boxer Rebellion (1899)—Fed up with foreigners in their country, a secret society of martial artists (fighters)
rebelled. They called themselves the Righteous and Harmonious Fists (called Boxers by Europeans because of
their fighting skills). They killed Europeans and Chinese Christians but were defeated by multinational forces
which led to more open trade with China. After this rebellion, other nations including the US demanded equal
trading rights in China, called an “open door policy”.