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Journal W-2
1. Explain how clouds form.
2. How do we classify clouds?
3. Compare and contrast freezing
rain and sleet.
4. What is dew point?
TURN IN JOURNALS!
Text Reference: 79-85
Journal W-3
Think about when
and where
clouds form.
1. Where are the
high and low
pressure
systems on this
map?
2. How do you
know?
1. An air mass is a large body of air that
has properties similar to the part of
Earth’s surface over which it develops.
2. Air masses usually sit in one place for
many days
3. Air mass names come from two properties
of air masses
a. Moisture content (humidity) -Air masses
with moisture form over water and dry
air masses form over land
b. Temperature-Air masses that form at
the poles are cold and the ones that
form in the tropics (or near the equator)
are warm.
4. 4 Categories of air masses based on moisture
content and how close to the equator the air mass
formed
Maritime
Polar
Maritime
Tropical
Continental
Polar
Continental
Tropical
Maritime
Polar
Maritime
Tropical
5. Highs and Lows
a. Weather includes both high
and low pressure systems.
b. Winds move from areas of
high pressure to areas of
low pressure (is this
familiar?).
c. High-clear skies and calm
air because of sinking air
d. Low-fast-rising air creates
clouds with rainy, stormy
weather
6. Fronts-A boundary between
two air masses of different
density, moisture, or
temperature. There are 4 kinds
of fronts.
*make sure you notice weather
map symbols.
6a. Cold Front
 cold air pushes under toward warm air
causing abrupt weather changes.
 Forms tall cumulonimbus clouds
 Cooler temperatures and heavy precipitation
(tornadoes and thunderstorms)
6b. Warm Front
Warm air slowly pushes over a cold air mass
Warmer temperatures
Flat stratus clouds form
Can lead to hours or even days of wet
weather [precipitation].
6c. Stationary Front
 Occurs when a boundary between air masses
stops advancing
 They may remain in the same place for
several days producing light wind, fog and
long periods of precipitation (snow or rain).
6d. Occluded Front
(not found in the book!)
Three air masses of different temperature
collide: colder air, cool air and warm air.
The colder air forces the warm air upward,
closing the warm air off from the surface.
Stratocumulus clouds form
Long periods of precipitation occur
7. Swirling Air
• Sometimes the boundaries between fronts gets
distorted and it causes air to swirl in 2 ways:
– Cyclone
-Anticyclone
>Spin CCW
>Spin CW
>low pressure
>high pressure
>Clouds, wind,
>clear, dry weather
precipitation
Journal W-4: Diagram and name
that front!