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King Island Cat Control Program
2010
King Island Cat Control Project
June 2010
Report prepared by
Jamie Cooper FERAL MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS
Acknowledgements
Thanks to the committed people who gave up their valuable time, apologies if I haven’t
listed you all.
Bear Alexander, Tom Blake, Tom Brooks, Nigel Burgess, Mavis Burgess, Graeme
Conley, Nick Cooper, Jim Cooper, John Cross, Noela Cross, Shelley Davison, Eva
Finzel, Katie Graham, Nick Johannsohn, Eli Jorgensen, Alan Lewis, Jen Milne,
Raymond Perry , Robert Skipworth, Sharon Stanfield, Max Summers,
Abbreviations
IACRC
Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre
KIC
King Island Council
KIGBA
King Island Game Birds Association
KINRM
King Island Natural Resource Management Group
PWS
Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania
2
Contents
Acknowledgements ...................................................................................................................2
Abbreviations ..............................................................................................................................2
Contents ..........................................................................................................................................5
Summary .........................................................................................................................................5
1.
Program and literature review ..........................................................................................6
1.1.
KINRMG Cat Control Program 2005-2006 .........................................................6
1.1.1. Assist the recovery of threatened fauna by reducing feral cat numbers in
priority areas ...........................................................................................................................6
1.1.2.
Determine future priority control sites through collecting cat baseline data .6
1.1.3. Raise community awareness of the need for restraining domestic cats from
roaming and becoming feral. ...............................................................................................6
1.1.4. Removal of a large number of cats from the island by assisting the
community to undertake control measures. .......................................................................6
1.2.
The King Island Cat Management Plan 2008-2013..........................................7
1.2.1.
Priority species .......................................................................................................7
1.2.2.
Priority Areas ..........................................................................................................7
1.2.3.
Priority Objectives and actions ............................................................................7
Objective 1: Ensure King Island is well placed to receive funding, research
projects and additional support from State and local government .......................7
Action 1.1 Develop working relationships with other State organisations and groups
involved in cat management ................................................................................................7
Objective 2: Improve responsible cat ownership .......................................................8
Action 2.1 Adopt a local By-law to reflect the capacity of the anticipated Cat
Management legislation for Tasmania. ..............................................................................8
Objective 3: Improve our understanding of impacts of feral cats on native
wildlife. ...................................................................................................................................8
Action 3.1 Undertake a dietary study of feral cats ............................................................8
Objective 4: Improve community understanding on the impacts of feral,
domestic and stray cats on wildlife. ...............................................................................9
Action 4.1 Enhance the education of local residents and agencies...............................9
Objective 5: Protect habitat of vulnerable species .....................................................9
Action 5.1 Undertake targeted trapping of feral and stray cats at key sites .................9
Action 5.2 Engage experienced cat trappers from locally and abroad. .........................9
1.3.
Cat Management Legislation ............................................................................. 10
1.3.1.
Breeding and sale of cats .................................................................................. 10
1.3.2.
Microchipping and Desexing of Cats ............................................................... 11
3
2.3.3
Cat Management Facilities ................................................................................ 11
2.3.3
Managing Stray and Feral Cats ........................................................................ 12
2.3.4
Local Government .............................................................................................. 12
Communications Plan ................................................................................................. 13
2.
2.1.
Stakeholder consultation ........................................................................................... 13
2.2.
Review of cat sighting sheets and data collection ................................................. 13
2.3.
Community awareness .............................................................................................. 13
3.
Monitoring cat activity in the Orange Bellied Parrot habitat ............................. 13
3.1.
4.
Trapping of cats in the Sea Elephant area. ........................................................ 13
Program Implementation ............................................................................................ 13
4.1.
Priority areas identified and trapping logistics determined ............................... 13
4.2.
Cage and Bait selection ......................................................................................... 14
4.3.
Volunteer participation ........................................................................................... 14
5.
Program results ............................................................................................................ 15
6.
Future suggested directions ..................................................................................... 17
7.
Summary ......................................................................................................................... 19
References................................................................................................................................... 20
4
Contents
Summary
The King Island Natural Resource Management Group, Feral Management Solutions
and the King Island Game Bird Association with assistance from the community
supported a short intensive feral cat control program undertaken from the 21st May 2010
to the 6th June 2010.
The program’s aim was to build on the knowledge gained from previous control
programs while considering available resources and community capacity. The
implementation of this program had components that would investigate and potentially
further develop programs for effective long term feral cat management for King Island.
As part of the program a review of previous cat control activities including available
literature and impending legislation was undertaken to provide direction to ongoing
activities.
A communications strategy was also developed and implemented to inform the local
community of the program and promote participation.
It was not the intention of this program to target domestic cats and microchip scanning
was used identify these.
The program intended to;
Reduce the number of feral cats on King Island and help protect the unique, rare and
threatened species that inhabit or visit King Island including the Critically
Endangered Orange –Bellied Parrot.
Provide further training for the community on cage trapping and monitoring of feral cats.
Explore the potential use of feeding stations and permanent cages.
Trial a number of new cage designs for improved catch effort.
Collect stomach contents for dietary analysis.
Continue to promote responsible cat ownership
5
1. Program and literature review
1.1. KINRMG Cat Control Program 2005-2006
This program undertaken in 2006 and delivered under a Threatened Species
Network Community Grant by the King Island Natural Resource Management
Group and was effective in removing 121 cats from King Island over a three
month period. Surveys undertaken indicated that cats were widespread
across the island including the Orange Bellied Parrot habitat around Sea
Elephant.
The program had a number of objectives
1.1.1. Assist the recovery of threatened fauna by reducing feral cat
numbers in priority areas
1.1.2. Determine future priority control sites through collecting cat
baseline data
1.1.3. Raise community awareness of the need for restraining
domestic cats from roaming and becoming feral.
The program on review delivered a number of quality outputs including
1.1.4. Removal of a large number of cats from the island by
assisting the community to undertake control measures.
Although remaining cats are able to reproduce and continue to feed
into the population, impacts would have been reduced particularly in
some areas of significant biodiversity.
1.1.5. The collection and storage of data from the program and the
development of a database and systems that will provide the
basis for ongoing consistent data capture. The establishment of
sand pads for identifying the presence or absence of cats
indicated cats were widespread across the island.
1.1.6. Community awareness of the impacts of feral cats and the
need for responsible cat ownership were promoted through a
number of avenues with positive response. Twenty five domestic
cats were desexed and a responsible cat ownership brochure
was developed and distributed to 700 house holds.
6
1.2. The King Island Cat Management Plan 2008-2013
This document outlines the past and current strategies related to
responsible cat ownership and conservation of high priority biodiversity
assets through feral cat control. The document also highlights the social
and economic impacts of cats including disease and related issues. It then
provides direction to future management options including research and
control.
A list of proposed management actions are identified including priority
species for management, priority areas for management and management
actions.
1.2.1.
Priority species
A number of vertebrate fauna were identified as being impacted
upon by cats with one rare species of frog and a number of species
of birds including the critically endangered orange bellied parrot.
Other rare species vulnerable to predation include the Long-nosed
potoroo, Swamp Antechinus and Eastern Pigmy Possum
1.2.2.
Priority Areas
A number of areas have been identified as requiring specific
management with regard to cats. Any food or shelter availability
needs to be minimised or eliminated where practicable to reduce
the population increase and flow of cats into the surrounding
environment.
Other sites identified represent areas of high biodiversity or critical
habitat for threatened species.
1.2.3.
Priority Objectives and actions
These were developed as a guide to the future direction of cat
management on the island and were dependent on resourcing and
funding availability.
Objective 1: Ensure King Island is well placed to receive
funding, research projects and additional support from
State and local government
Action 1.1 Develop working relationships with other State
organisations and groups involved in cat management
Task 1.1.1 Maintain correspondence with the Tasmanian Cat
Management Network, electing a local representative to disseminate
information to the KINRM, PWS and King Island Council (KIC).
Task 1.1.2 Initiate relationships with agencies and institutions
with experience in cat management to provide strategic advice for
cat management particularly in relation to feral cats.
Task 1.2.3. Maintain local involvement in cat management,
including research into predatory impacts of feral cats.
7
Objective 2: Improve responsible cat ownership
The responsibility for managing individual domestic cats rests
with the owner. Irresponsible cat owners and those that feed unowned cats, play a major role in maintaining populations of stray
cats in urban and rural areas (anon 1999). Responsible
management of the domestic cat population aims to remove the
source population of feral cats on King Island, and to enable easy
identification of owned and un-owned cats
Action 2.1 Adopt a local By-law to reflect the capacity of the
anticipated Cat Management legislation for Tasmania.
Objectives of the Draft Cat Management By–Law that was
developed for King Island Council in August 2006 including
ensuring that:
 The cat is permanently identified so that it can be
distinguished as a domestic cat;
 The cat is de-sexed to avoid producing unwanted kittens;
 The cats dietary, health and housing needs, and it’s general
care are provided
 The cat is confined within the boundaries of the owners
property
 Suitable boarding facilities are found when the cats owners
are unable to attend to the cats needs such as while on
holiday
 There is a duty of care to neighbours and the community and
 There is a duty of care to the environment
Implement and enforce a restriction on the import of live cats
with the aim of ensuring the new cat arrivals are de-sexed or
registered as breeding stock at a registered local cattery to
comply with the upcoming Tasmanian cat management
legislation.
Objective 3: Improve our understanding of impacts of feral
cats on native wildlife.
Action 3.1 Undertake a dietary study of feral cats
Task
Facilitate a dietary analysis of feral cat diets with support from
Deakin University and Cradle Coast NRM
Utilise evidence gained from dietary studies and relevant
scientific literature to direct targeted feral cat management for
ecologically sensitive areas.
8
Objective 4: Improve community understanding on the
impacts of feral, domestic and stray cats on wildlife.
Action 4.1 Enhance the education of local residents and
agencies
Task
Engage experts to provide training and advice in responsible cat
ownership animal welfare and the complex issues associated with
feral cat management.
Objective 5: Protect habitat of vulnerable species
Action 5.1 Undertake targeted trapping of feral and stray cats at
key sites
Task
Establish a local cat working group to oversee the
implementation and management of targeted cat trapping efforts.
This effort should be based on information gathered through the
dietary analysis and another sources to ensure that objectives of the
trapping are met.
Action 5.2 Engage experienced cat trappers from locally and
abroad.
Task
Hold workshops locally to educate locals on best practice
trapping, and of the legal issues relevant to feral and stray cat
trapping and hunting. This will ensure a well educated, best practice
trapping approach on the island.
9
1.3. Cat Management Legislation
The Cat Management Act 2009 was passed by the Tasmanian
parliament on 19th November 2009 and is expected to be proclaimed by
July 2011.
The legislation aims to
 Promote the welfare and responsible ownership of cats, including
the desexing and microchipping of domestic cats.
 Provide for the effective management of cats, allowing for the
humane handling and management of unidentified stray cats; and
 Reduce the negative effects of cats on the environment.
Before the Act can commence, a number of tasks need to be
completed. This work includes developing new Cat Management
Regulations, information resources and administrative processes.
This will be done in consultation with groups representing animal
welfare interests and local government, which all have been
involved in the development of the Act.
The Cat Management Act 2009 covers:

The breeding and sale of cats

The microchipping and desexing of domestic cats,

The operation of Cat Management Facilities, including the
reclaiming of lost cats and holding times for cats; and

The management of stray and feral cats.
1.3.1.
Breeding and sale of cats

As a first step to reduce the number of cats that become unwanted and
are euthanized each year, the legislation provides that only registered
breeders are able to breed cats.

A member of an approved cat association will automatically be
recognised as a registered breeder. Someone who wishes to breed
“moggie” cats, or who is not a member of one of the associations, will
be able to apply to be a registered cat breeder.

There will be no restriction on who can sell or give away cats; however,
all cats sold or given away will have to be at least 8 weeks of age,
microchipped and desexed prior to sale (unless a care agreement has
been entered into)

Once legislation commences a person who breeds cats who is not a
registered breeder, or who sells or gives away a cat that does not meet
the sale requirements, could face a fine.

This aims to ensure that all new domestic cats are desexed and
microchipped, unless being born from registered breeders.
10
1.3.2.
Microchipping and Desexing of Cats

The legislation aims to encourage responsible cat ownership, including
microchipping and desexing of domestic cats. Owners that already have
their cat desexed and microchipped already meet the requirements of the
legislation.

While there is no direct penalty for failing to desex and microchip cats
owned before the legislation commences, there will be a compulsory
element phased in after four years: after that, it will be necessary for cats
being reclaimed from a Cat Management Facility to be desexed and
microchipped.

Uncontrolled breeding results in unwanted cats and each year thousands
of cats are destroyed because there are not enough homes. Desexing
your cat can assist in overcoming this problem.
2.3.3 Cat Management Facilities

The legislation significantly clarifies the rights and powers of Cat
Management Facilities (animal welfare shelters). Among other things, it
specifies minimum holding times for cats, allowed cat owners time to look
for lost pets, while also providing a framework for shelters dealing with
unidentified, stray and feral cats.

Cat Management Facilities will be required to hold cats for at least 5 days
if they are microchipped and 3 days if they are not microchipped, to
provide time for owners to reclaim their cat.

Microchips, implanted under a cat’s skin, are about the size of a grain of
rice and use a unique identification number to identify you as your cat’s
owner. This makes it faster and easier for you to be reunited with your cat
in the event that your cat is missing.

Cat owners may recognise that these holding times are consistent with
those for dogs entering a Council Pound.
11
2.3.3 Managing Stray and Feral Cats

Stray and feral cats pose significant threats to Tasmania’s native animals
and to farm stock through the spread of Toxoplasmosis. The legislation
therefore clarifies the powers necessary to continue controlling stray and
feral cats in “prohibited areas”, which include land reserved mainly for the
protection of natural values.

Prohibited areas include all reserved lands under the Nature
Conservation Act 2002 including National Parks and Conservation areas,
as well as land subject to conservation covenants, public reserves under
the Crown Lands Act 1976 ; and private timber reserves, forest reserves
and State forest under the relevant forestry legislation.

The rights of farmers with livestock and managers of rural properties in
remote areas are also set out.

The Cat Management Act 2009 clarifies that a ‘farmer’, defined as a
person carrying on primary production related to livestock on rural land or
a person acting on behalf of such a person, may trap seize or humanely
destroy any cat found on that land.

There are no requirements that the rural land be any distance from other
properties, though of course other legislation such as the Firearms Act
applies. This scenario is consistent with how farmers have been able to
handle dogs found on their rural properties under the Dog Control Act.

In a separate scenario, a person who has land more than one kilometre
from any place genuinely used as a place of residence may trap seize or
humanely destroy a cat found on his or her private property. This case
would relate to people who live or own land in remote areas.

In both cases the cat may be returned to its owner or taken to a Cat
Management Facility (animal welfare shelter). Again, other legislation,
particularly the Firearms Act and the Animal Welfare Act, would always
need to be complied with.
2.3.4 Local Government

Local Councils have no additional obligations under the legislation, but
voluntary action is facilitated. Councils may declare council-controlled
land as prohibited areas, or declare “cat management areas” to
support local initiatives, following consultation with their community.

The legislation also clarifies the ability of Councils to make by-laws in
relation to cat management.
12
2. Communications Plan
2.1. Stakeholder consultation
Scoping meetings were undertaken with stakeholders to determine levels of
participation. Representatives from a number of key supporting organisations
were contacted and levels of resourcing were established.
2.2. Review of cat sighting sheets and data collection
Cat sighting sheets from the previous program in 2006 were reviewed and to
assist the cage trapping program were located in the towns and distributed to
the community. The sheets were extremely useful in identifying individual cats
and increasing our ability to catch them.
The data collection was also reviewed to determine useful information that
may assist in the delivery of the program.
2.3. Community awareness
Previous cat programs indicated a high level of community support with 750
surveys sent out, 134 returned with only 2 not supporting the program. Prior
to the 2010 program being undertaken a number of articles were placed in the
King Island Courier to alert the community to the proposed control effort.
A radio interview during the control program was undertaken with the Country
Hour.
3. Monitoring cat activity in the Orange Bellied Parrot habitat
3.1. Trapping of cats in the Sea Elephant area.
Trapping was undertaken by Nigel Burgess who volunteered his time for a
number of months before the main trapping exercise occurred. This effort was
necessary due to the timing of the migration of the Orange Bellied Parrot which
occurred during early autumn ahead of the most effective time for cat cage
capture occurring in late autumn/winter. A monitoring camera was utilised to
assist in the identification of any cats in the area that may have been trap shy.
Nigel Burgess was successful in removing a number of cats from the area thus
reducing the potential for predation of parrots.
4. Program Implementation
4.1. Priority areas identified and trapping logistics determined
Priority areas for cat control containing significant biodiversity were identified
from the King Island Cat Management Plan and from local knowledge obtained
through interview. Cat locations and areas of high cat activity were obtained from
the cat sighting sheets supplied to the community before the commencement of
the program.
The layout of the road network on King Island and the ongoing commitment by a
number of individuals in various areas indicated that a broad scale high intensity
approach may be feasible. A large number of cages would be required to ensure
13
a high percentage of cat exposure to cages. It was expected that a large number
of cages would be available purchased through previous programs.
A logistics plan was drawn up following a meeting with participants. Inputs into
the plan included:










Timeframe of trapping program
numbers of cages available
numbers of participants,
areas participants lived
participants level of input and role
various areas trapping history
current cat location data
road distances
accessibility of sites
discussion on bait selection
Due to the smaller number of cages available than expected the trapping
program was divided into two phases. The Southern half of the island was
intensively trapped followed by the Northern half. This required a significant
amount of work extra work but was expected to increase the capture rate and
give more reliable indications of distribution.
4.2.
Cage and Bait selection
Standard treadle plate cages were used and proprietary cat food initially was
selected for use as bait/attractant however due to the presence of blowflies and
the exposure to moisture from intermittent rainfall the addition of kangaroo to the
cages was required to improve the length of bait serviceability. Kangaroo was
also suspended in the cage to air dry and reduce the amount of fly strike. Due to
the short nature of the program, cages were moved at relatively short intervals
with cats possibly remaining wary of a new structure in their territory.
New cage designs were trialed but arrived late in the program so insufficient time
was available to fully investigate their effectiveness. Further trials will be
undertaken with these traps in programs started in North East Tasmania. The
results of these will be made available.
4.3.
Volunteer participation
Over 25 volunteers participated in the program and enabled the Island to be
broad scale intensively trapped.
Significant support to the program was contributed by the King Island Game Bird
Association. All volunteers contributed time to check cages and were able to trap
a number of roads allowing further trapping to be conducted at more remote high
value conservation areas.
14
5. Program results

Cats were widespread across the island but where localised trapping
efforts were underway populations were reduced.

Cat prints were located on all beaches surveyed

Cat prints were present at regular intervals along Martha Lavinia beach to
the Sea Elephant River. ( Orange Bellied Parrot habitat)

All feral cats captured were in good health and condition

Consistent trapping by individuals such as Nigel Burgess in the Sea
Elephant (OBP) area has the ability to maintain extremely low densities of
cats.

Although only minor trapping was undertaken in Currie, observations
indicated a large movement of domestic/stray cats within the town
boundary after dark.

Cats may be present and exposed to cages but did not trap.

The opportunity to shoot cats could be an option particularly in remote
areas of the coastline but should be restricted to trained personnel with
appropriate firearms licences operating under the National guidelines
CAT001 for shooting of cats.

A number of committed individuals present on the island are committed to
reducing the threat of feral cats on the environment.

The use of bait stations would not be worthwhile due to the amount of road
kill but permanent cages should be maintained at sites where cats may be
attracted such as the King Island Dairy, Currie waste management facility,
Red Hut Rd Abattoir and the main abattoirs.

Remote cameras were a useful tool in identifying the presence or absence
of cats particularly in high biodiversity conservation areas.

The program delivery required a 4wd and ATV for effective access to
sites.

Community based annual broad scale high intensity trapping programs are
feasible with moderate funding on King Island and are an option for
keeping cat densities low.

Cages were located at 167 locations across King Island
15

Significant numbers of cats were present at Stokes Point, Cataraqui Point
and Red Hut Rd.

Grassy Harbour penguin colony had a low level of cat activity and cameras did
not identify cat presence.

Thirty six cats were captured during the intensive program with stomach’s
collected and currently undergoing analysis. These 36 cats with an
average weight of 2 kg consume around 2.6 tonne of food per annum.
Although road kill may make a high percentage of the cats diet in some
areas the hypothetical potential for 36 cats if they made a <200 g kill each
day (Honey Eater 20g, Superb Wren 10g, Mouse 25g, Brown Quail 91g)
would be consumption of around 13,000 prey species per annum.

Tabby was the predominant colour of cats captured.

All data was collated and entered into the database.
16
6. Future suggested directions
The King island Cat Management Plan 2008-2013 outlines strategic overall
direction for the management of domestic and feral cats on King Island
and outlines a number of objectives and tasks to be implemented over
the life of the strategy due to be reviewed in 2013. Cat management is
relatively new in Tasmania with many programs only being
implemented over the past few years. Responsible cat ownership is
slowly being adopted by the community and continued effort needs to
be maintained to change community attitudes on the management of
domestic, stray and feral cats. Information also on new techniques,
technology and better understanding of program resourcing,
coordination and logistics has been gained recently. This has enabled
some community control programs to be implemented more effectively
on a larger scale.
Some further considerations to improve the program effectiveness could
include;

New cage designs are currently being developed that will increase the
capture rate of cats and these may be useful on potentially cage wary
cats.

Checking cages every 24 hrs under National guidelines is necessary for
animal welfare considerations but is time consuming and expensive. New
cages being developed have trigger alarms that indicate door release and
cage monitoring could be managed remotely.

Permanent cages should be installed at all sites identified as priority areas
that support cat populations in the King Island Cat Management Plan
2008-2013.

Further trials on bait selection focussing on bait longevity would be
worthwhile. The climate on King Island is not conducive to long bait life in
the cage due to moisture and fly strike. The replacement of degraded baits
in cages to ensure maximum attraction to cats is time consuming but
essential to maximise the capture of cats. Although some hungry cats may
be attracted to degraded baits, most cats prefer prey fresh.

Control of cats in priority conservation areas should be incorporated into
an annual intensive island wide program that will to give a landscape wide
approach. Travelling from the major centres to these areas given transport
and time would be more effective if trapping occurred on the route. If these
areas are identified for cat control then control efforts by individuals living
close to the site would be more efficient. An area that would be given
special status is the OBP area at Sea Elephant as trapping there is linked
to the migration of the Orange Bellied Parrot.
17

Opportunistic trapping by organisations such as Parks and Wildlife could
be undertaken by various organisations where activities are being
undertaken for more than a day at a particular site.

The use of the cat specific toxin would be a useful addition to the control
program and the availability of this tool should be monitored.

The development of “CAT MONTH” held for one month in winter annually
that implemented a broad scale high intensity approach. This annual
community based program would have a number of benefits but would
require coordination and some resourcing. The annual focus would allow
for further integration of the program into the community and would allow
for more effective preparation and coordination, important to the program’s
success. Cage trapping for one month would have some benefits in that
cages could be set in areas for a significant period of time potentially
allowing the capture of cage wary cats.
The approach would be to:
o Promote the event and get a broad scale cross
community/industry/local govt support.
o Apply for funding
o Identify a coordinator with the relevant skills and licences and
equipment.
o Identify individuals travelling sections of road regularly that would
be willing to participate by checking cages as a drive by. Areas
needing volunteers may be advertised in the paper.
o Identify householders who are willing to assist by monitoring nearby
cages and notifying coordinator of capture.
o Cages would be set by a coordinator/volunteer so as to be visible
from the car at slow speeds and information on any animal capture
would be passed on to a coordinator. The coordinator would then
check the cage and process any feral cats caught and rearm the
cage.
o Identify gap areas within the island that may require coordinator
trapping input or cages with trigger alarms.
o Gather and reallocate cages owned by the KINRMG within the
month to ensure appropriate distribution across the landscape.
These could be released back to active cat trappers after the
month.
o Source additional cages required to support the program
(potentially 200 to 300 cages)
o Promote and support the humane trapping of stray and feral cats
within the towns during the month. All microchipped cats to be
released back to their owners. This should be based on the new
legislative framework.
o The removal of all non-desexed cats is a priority and farmers or
landholders keeping cats for theoretical rodent control may be given
18
rodent bait stations and an information leaflet on effective rodent
control. The new legislation may be required to enforce this but
significant community consultation and information dissemination is
required before this action occurs.
o The coordinators role apart from an organisational role would be to
collect samples from cats for analysis and to ensure all data is
collected appropriately and entered into the database.
7. Summary
The continued implementation of cat management on King Island under the strategic
plan will be assisted by the introduction of cat legislation that outlines the roles and
responsibilities of individuals and the community. It also gives clear guidelines in the
management of stray and feral cats.
Cat management programs can be expensive and time consuming to implement and
require the support of the whole community to be successful. Everybody has a role
to play in the implementation of the program, cat owners need to be responsible and
have their cat’s desexed, microchipped and confined at night.
The community has a responsibility in not feeding or sheltering feral and stray cats so
reproductive ability is limited and the dispersal of cats into the environment is
reduced. This includes organisations or industries that naturally attract cats in their
operations.
Government has a role to play by supporting community efforts with appropriate
regulatory activity.
Eradication is not feasible with the current resources available but with an annual broad
scale high intensity trapping program combined with the adoption of new techniques
and strategies, cat populations could be maintained at low levels.
19
References
Abley, A. (2006). TSN Community Grant Final Report-King Island Cat Control Project,.
Currie: KIng Island Natural Resource Management Group.
Anon. (1999). Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by Feral Cats,. Canberra:
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