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Disclaimer:
The summary described herein should in no way be construed as official or unofficial policy, nor should it be
seen to reflect the consensus of those who participated in the consultations.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
2
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
3
SUMMARY OF THEMES & OUTCOMES
5
HealthSafetyWellness
6
EqualityEmpowerment
13
StrengthBalanceHonour
18
CONCLUSION
19
INTRODUCTION
The United Native Nations (UNN) is a provincial organisation dedicated to providing
political support for all Aboriginal people, particularly off-reserve Aboriginal peoples. In
2003, UNN determined that Aboriginal women required specific consideration for their
issues and has since been working toward fulfilling a mandate for positive change.
From June 20-22 2007, the Premiers of each of the Provinces met in Newfoundland and
Labrador with 150 Aboriginal women from across the country to discuss Aboriginal
Women’s issues at a National Summit.
UNN received funding from the Ministry of Community Services in order to open a dialogue
session with Aboriginal women across the province to determine issues important to BC’s
Aboriginal women.
This report outlines the findings of four regional Roundtable Sessions in anonymity of the
140 women who participated by focusing on the issues that emerged. Some regional
differences were observed. In Vancouver, women were concerned about the outfall from
residential school and with childcare. In Victoria, trauma resulting from experimentation at
the Nanaimo Indian School and loss of culture were areas of discussion. The need for
Aboriginal women in leadership and need for employment skills were highlighted in Prince
George. The Final Report is a summary of responses by Roundtable participants.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
UNN provided a non-political climate in which Aboriginal women could freely explore their
frustrations with their current living environment, understanding that historically Aboriginal
women held high positions of power within Aboriginal communities, a status that seems to
have been lost.
With the financial support from the Ministry of Community Services, UNN organised four
regional roundtable sessions: Victoria on April 16; Vancouver on April 20; Prince George
on April 26 and Kamloops on May 7, 2007.
The findings of the Roundtable discussions and the targeted consultation and survey
results have been compiled in this report and were used in the discussions at the National
Aboriginal Women’s Summit in Newfoundland and Labrador. Follow-up will ensue with
BC’s Aboriginal leadership.
Below are six priority outcomes that arose from the Roundtables and survey responses
from Aboriginal women.
The governments of British Columbia and Canada need to make a special and
sincere apology to Aboriginal women. The governments need to make a
commitment to improve the socio-economic conditions of Aboriginal women in the
future and address the issues of today. It is only with these actions that there will be
a firm understanding from Canadian society why it carries the burden of generations
of women hurting from the past. Focussing on the root causes of what Aboriginal
women face rather than just the symptoms will help Aboriginal women take their
rightful place in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal society.
Matrimonial real property rights must be fairly reviewed by the government to
ensure a more fair and equitable system that aligns with the system off reserve; one
that does not unfairly offer more rights to men than women.
The creation of a BC’s Aboriginal Women’s Council that would work expressly to
further the positive evolution of Native women’s issues.
The BC Aboriginal Women’s Council would also work towards the positive
development and encouragement of young Aboriginal women into future
leadership roles.
The repeal of Section 6 of Bill C-31 that would return rightful status to Aboriginal
women and their children. The children of a status Indian woman can pass on status
to their children only if they marry registered Indians, whereas the grandchildren of
a status male will have full status, despite the fact that one of their parents may not
have status. Those non-entitled to registration are expected to begin to outnumber
those entitled to registration in about three generations, with no further children
entitled to registration in about six generations. About 70% of "Bill C-31 induced"
growth has occurred off reserve. Not only does Section 6 favour the male, it also
promotes the assimilation of Aboriginal people.
Establishment of Healing Lodges around the province that are operated by
Aboriginal women and are a place that Aboriginal women can come to work or come
to heal. Healing Lodges would also provide the sense of community currently
lacking in the lives of many Aboriginal women. There is a great need for Aboriginal
women’s institutions that would provide an array of services to Aboriginal women
and their families, like counselling for residential school survivors, life skills, family
support and a safe place to meet.
The further promotion and establishment of Aboriginal women’s forums where
women can speak openly and honestly about their current situations and know that
other women are experiencing the same challenges and successes. Aboriginal
women need to know that the government will be listening to their concerns and
making positive legislative choices. The Aboriginal women who attend these
roundtables want governments to outline how they will turn the information from
these forums into positive change.
ROUNDTABLE FORMAT & OBJECTIVES
Aboriginal women from around the province were invited to participate in a non-political
discussion about issues affecting them.
The overall objective of the Roundtables was to establish a base to determine what some
of the barriers are that are currently preventing Aboriginal women from fully participating in
general society; mainly employment, politics, education and social responsibilities. The
following Final Report is comprised of quotations from the Roundtables.
In order to open the dialogue session, three main themes were introduced to the
participants:
This report is organised so that an issue is identified, discussed and then followed by an
expected outcome (or outcomes).
The outcome refers to a measurement value, a means by which Aboriginal women will
know that something tangible is happening in response to the issue that is being
discussed.
HEALTH  SAFETY  WELLNESS
RECONCILIATION
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the consultations on
the topic of Reconciliation.
Many feel that Aboriginal women have taken the brunt of government abuse and have to
date received very little recognition and extremely limited reconciliation for past policy
decisions undertaken by successive provincial and federal governments.
In particular, the past treatment of Aboriginal women in Indian and tuberculosis hospitals
was horrendous. In some instances, Native women were used for science experiments,
such as involuntary sterilisation. Generations are still affected by the negative impact such
experiments had on the Aboriginal population. Aboriginal women and their families who
suffered in Indian hospitals want acknowledgement and apology from the federal
government.
Residential schools and the “60’s scoop” have had severe and lasting impacts for
Aboriginal women, such as alienation, marginalization and oppression. Because of the
legacy of residential school and the 60’s scoop, generations of Aboriginal women never
learned how to be parents. This is not to diminish the effect residential schools had on
men, but when a woman is unable to successfully bond with her child because she was not
taught how, it is the woman who bears the burden.
It was said by an Elder at the Vancouver Roundtable when she recounted the abuse she
encountered at residential school, that the federal government owes her an apology and
also owes her granddaughter an apology for generational lack of parenting skills.
Reconciliation is important because it opens a discussion for contemporary issues,
especially considering the amount of Aboriginal women who are missing and those who
have been found murdered. As long as these acts of violence happen in Canadian
society, these are social issues that deserve the respect and attention of the Canadian
Government.
OUTCOME:
The Governments of British Columbia and Canada need to make a special and
sincere apology to Aboriginal women. The governments need to make a commitment
to improve the socio-economic conditions of Aboriginal women in the future and
address the issues of today. It is only with these actions that there will be a firm
understanding for those living in Canadian society why it carries the burden of
generations of women hurting from the past.
MEDICAL SUPPORT
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Medical Support.
Many Aboriginal women report that they are not treated with respect and dignity within the
medical system. Accounts of racist acts were recounted at all of the Roundtable sessions.
If an Aboriginal woman is not treated with respect within the medical system, neither are
her children. Quality and accessible medical care is something that distinguishes Canada
as a caring and socially responsible country, but if that system does not work for
everybody, then it doesn’t work for anybody. Aboriginal women and children deserve the
same quality of medical care that every other Canadian receives.
Aboriginal women are also traditionally accustomed to the support of their female family
members and require some flexibility on the part of the medical staff to accommodate this
need. If in fact the mandate of the medical system is to heal people, then there must be
some sensitivity as to how Aboriginal women are healed.
Traditionally, Aboriginal women were supported by women during the birthing process.
While understanding that the medical system and all of its technology is a sometimes
necessary service, the medical system should also embrace the traditions of the past as
complementary to the present.
OUTCOMES:
Aboriginal education programs in the health sector that include modules on
sensitivity, traditions and culture.
Aboriginal support workers in the hospitals to assist Aboriginal families navigate
through the medical system and at times act as an advocate for their traditional way
of life.
The establishment of Aboriginal Family Lodges near the hospital that can house and
nurture a family facing a difficult medical situation. (A type of Ronald McDonald
house for Aboriginal families, operated by Aboriginal persons).
The establishment of an Aboriginal Women’s Healing Centre. For example,
Anishinawbe Health in Toronto (AHT), an accredited community health centre, offers
access to health care practitioners from many disciplines including Traditional
Healers, Elders, Medicine People and a Woman’s Helper. AHT also has doctors,
physicians, naturopaths and psychiatrists, among others. Other AHT services
include Nmakaandjiiwin (Finding My Way), a homelessness programme, where
individuals are provided the opportunity to better understand and gain insight of
homelessness issues and how these may relate to their lives. AHT was mentioned
several times as a model for Aboriginal wellness and for Healing Lodges.
MATRIMONIAL REAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Matrimonial Real Property Rights.
Currently if a woman lives off reserve and owns a home with her husband, if a divorce
occurs there are mechanisms within the judicial system that provide for a fair and equitable
division of properties.
If a woman lives on reserve, and that reserve happens to be that of the man, he will retain
the home without resistance from the courts. Women living on reserve find it extremely
difficult to get access to adequate housing.
OUTCOME:
Matrimonial real property rights must be fairly reviewed by the federal government
to ensure a more fair and equitable system that aligns with the system off reserve;
one that does not unfairly offer more rights to men than women.
ADDICTION
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Addiction.
There are several reasons why addiction and substance abuse appear in higher numbers
within the Aboriginal community; residential school is but one of the results of colonisation.
Regardless of why people become addicted to life-threatening substances, they should still
be entitled to support systems that offer realistic strategies for recovery. As long as people
are fighting addictions, they are not in a healthy state of mind to be a contributing member
of society.
Knowing that several factors contribute to a person becoming addicted, substance abuse is
a multi-faceted and, in some cases, a multi-generational issue.
For women who are addicted and are seeking treatment, there is an immediate resistance
to seeking help, because by admitting that she has an addiction, her children will be taken
from her and placed in care. Still suffering from the residential school system where
children were taken from their families, some mothers feel that whatever home they can
provide is better than the one to which the children would be going.
OUTCOMES:
Aboriginal treatment centres that allow women to take their children so women can
access longer and more effective addictions treatment. Also a centre that teaches
holistic healing that includes the entire family. If a parent is fighting an addiction, a
child is largely impacted and deserves equal services.
Better access to existing care and more recovery beds across the province.
Increasing home care budgets will also help women in recovery.
Culturally relevant curriculum for elementary and secondary schools that teach
about the negative effects of drug and alcohol abuse. Promoting a greater
connection to the land also aids in living a healthy lifestyle. Cultural rediscovery
camps operating in some parts of the province are helping Aboriginal people lead a
healthier lifestyle.
HIV/AIDS
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of HIV/AIDS.
HIV and AIDS are considered as a separate topic since they affect Aboriginal people at a
higher rate than any other demographic. HIV / AIDS is a consequence of poverty, abuse,
addiction, racism and / or marginalisation in general, and is a reality for many Aboriginal
women.
In particular, Aboriginal women in Victoria mentioned that there are only two organisations
in Victoria and that these organisations can receive Aboriginal funding with only two
Aboriginal clients accessing their services. In order to establish truly culturally relevant
services, HIV positive Aboriginal women in Victoria started a family support group that
meets in people’s homes and they have meetings when people have money to contribute
for a meal.
OUTCOMES:
Aboriginal Healing Centres for HIV and AIDS throughout the province that are
operated by Aboriginal people and offer cultural hospice services.
There is a need for greater awareness of HIV/AIDS on reserve-“stop sweeping this
issue under the rug.” Front line workers and professionals on reserve need more
training to deal with this issue. Some people would undoubtedly live longer if they
received proper treatment.
VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Violence against Women.
Domestic violence continues to be a reality for many Aboriginal women and is a
generational cycle that is passed down to the children in a violent home. Domestic
violence is an indicator of the poor stature of women and is seen by some as a lashing out
by men for how they are treated in society. No matter the cause of violence against
women in the home, there is no viable means out of such situations for women who are
living on the man’s reserve. Currently, if her husband abuses a woman, it is up to her to
find a new place for her and their children to live since he will remain the legal owner of the
house if it is on the reserve. This is an issue that is continuing to push women off reserve
where it is seen that their political power is greatly diminished.
Many Roundtable participants feel that domestic violence is a reality that is ignored by the
Aboriginal community where the offender is quite often a political affiliate within the local
band office; an office that also administers federal funding for social service programs. As
long as men control the political offices that disperse funds, some women have no
recourse but to leave their reserves.
Furthermore, many women report that they do not receive an adequate response from the
police. Several instances were recounted of delayed arrival times for police after a woman
had called for help. In a few cases, women felt that the police had sympathised with the
man and refused to lay charges. This type of action from authorities further demoralises
women who feel more than ever that they deserve this type of treatment. Many children
grow up believing that domestic violence is understandable and even a normal part of life.
Participants felt that violence against women in general is inadequately handled by police.
Several women, speaking of their personal experiences. cited cases where violent rapes,
some by police, were left unreported. If the women made it to the hospital at all, the
medical staff often did not report the crime to authorities.
OUTCOMES:
There must be more Aboriginal safe houses available to Aboriginal women in
abusive situations. Aboriginal women are already facing a life altering challenge;
offering women non-Aboriginal safe houses isolates them from their culture and
traditional way of life. Aboriginal women need to be healed by other Aboriginal
women in a safe and culturally inviting environment.
There is enough domestic violence among Aboriginal communities to
make Aboriginal Safe Houses a reality.
The RCMP and local police authorities need further education and sensitivity
training with regard to Aboriginal women. This type of training needs to be
mirrored in the judicial system that many women feel sides with Aboriginal men in
custody suits, divorce law and domestic violence.
Medical staff also require a mandatory training program to alert them to the
environments from which some of these Aboriginal women are coming and the
historic and social factors that have led them to this situation.
Children need educational dialogue in their schools that teaches them that violence
is not acceptable. Programmes need to be implemented that will allow children to
report domestic violence without facing repercussions at home for themselves or
their mothers.
There is a need for Aboriginal violence telephone help lines that are staffed by
Aboriginal women who are familiar with Aboriginal cultures and traditions, and who
can help women navigate the maze of programs and services to find appropriate
assistance for themselves and their children.
MISSING WOMEN
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Missing Women.
Two of the Roundtable discussions were held in regions of British Columbia where the
health and lives of Aboriginal women are particularly threatened.
The Downtown East Side of Vancouver is the poorest neighbourhood in Canada and is
home to thousands of Aboriginal women facing a variety of social challenges, including
substance abuse, sex trade work and physical and emotional violence. It is also home to
an alleged serial murderer who targeted these types of women. There is outrage among
Aboriginal women that despite numerous reports of missing women, their pleas were
mostly unheeded by the authorities.
Aboriginal women have disappeared along the Highway 16 corridor between Prince
George and Prince Rupert, now known as the Highway of Tears. Many Roundtable
participants felt that the RCMP did not investigate reports of missing women to anyone’s
satisfaction.
OUTCOMES:
Exit strategies need to be introduced that will assist Aboriginal women on a path to
recovery from substance abuse. Long-term support services need to be in place in
order to ensure that a relapse does not happen.
First step addiction/recovery centres need to be accessible in the neighbourhoods
where women with addictions are living.
Aboriginal women’s telephone help lines that are operated by Aboriginal women
who can assist them with issues like substance abuse, domestic violence and sex
trade work.
EQUALITY  EMPOWERMENT
WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Women in Leadership.
There are very few Aboriginal women leaders. Just as contemporary Aboriginal leaders
express that non-Aboriginal people should not make decisions for Aboriginal people; many
Aboriginal women feel that Aboriginal male leaders should not make decisions for
Aboriginal women.
Moreover, many Roundtable participants feel that Aboriginal political leaders have excluded
women from inner circles of politics at the band level and up. To date, Aboriginal women
have not had an organized voice to combat the neglect of the past.
One such example was overturned in the early 1980’s when a section of the Indian Act
meant that Aboriginal women who married non-Aboriginal men were stripped of their legal
Indian status, as were their children. Aboriginal men who married non-Aboriginal women
not only retained their status, but Indian status was granted to their wives. This unfair law
was overturned in 1983, when Indian status was given back to women, pending
acceptance by their band. However, because of Section 6 of Bill C-31, the women still hold
classifications that prevent their descendants from receiving the Indian status to which they
should be entitled.
Another example refers back to the real property matrimonial rights unfairly siding with
men, leaving Aboriginal women with no rights to real property on reserve. Because of the
low numbers of Aboriginal women in leadership positions, Aboriginal women often lack
advocacy on their behalf for their property rights on reserve.
OUTCOMES
The creation of a BC Aboriginal Women’s Council that would work expressly to
further the positive evolution of Aboriginal women’s issues.
The BC Aboriginal Women’s Council would also foster the positive
development and encouragement of young Native Women into future
leadership roles.
The repeal of Section 6 of Bill C-31 that would return rightful status to Aboriginal
women and their children. The children of a status Indian woman can pass on status
to their children only if they marry registered Indians, whereas the grandchildren of
a status male will have full status, despite the fact that one of their parents may not
have status. Those non-entitled to registration are expected to begin to outnumber
those entitled to registration in about three generations, with no further children
entitled to registration in about six generations. About 70% of "Bill C-31 induced"
growth has occurred off reserve.
EMPLOYMENT FOR WOMEN
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Employment for Women.
Many Aboriginal women are still fighting for entry-level jobs in a labour market that very
rarely sees Aboriginal women in management positions. Preferential hiring of Aboriginal
people in Aboriginal organisations is an aid to some Aboriginal women; however, many
Aboriginal organisations are still headed by men.
Access to education is directly proportional to employability among Aboriginal women. In
order to have adequate access, Aboriginal women need support throughout elementary
and secondary school to earn the necessary pre-requisites for college and university.
Having children at an early age can hinder some women in attending school, college or
university. Unemployment numbers continue to grow as access to affordable childcare
decreases.
OUTCOMES:
Analysis of existing labour laws that allow for preferential hiring of Aboriginal people
by Aboriginal organisations to determine if this is an effective means by which to
promote employment of Aboriginal women.
Review childcare barriers to both furthering education and employment that may be
unique to Aboriginal women including transportation, seclusion and daycare
availability.
Review of the existing school system and its preparation of Aboriginal women for
college and university. A greater emphasis should be placed on trades, as there are
many women that could do and are doing these jobs on reserve. Greater access to
online learning and distance education would help women access Adult Basic
Education as well as post secondary schools.
Sex education, such as understanding the consequences of teenage pregnancy and
the impact of having children at an early age will have on a young person’s ability to
provide for themselves.
REUNITING CHILDREN WITH THEIR MOTHERS
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Reuniting Children with Their Mothers.
Although some may view this issue within the scope of health, the idea of mothers not
raising their own children becomes an issue of empowerment. For many women, their
children help to define who they are and the purpose they serve in the community. When
children are apprehended from the home and placed in care, there is part of the woman
that is undermined.
There was great discussion around children being removed from their homes with two
schools of thought; first, if the child is in an unsafe environment then the courts have a duty
to that child to protect him or her even if that means ordering an apprehension. The second
school of thought is that children are not being adequately cared for because parents do
not know how to care for the child, just as their parents did not know how to care for them.
By removing children from their homes, the courts are only perpetuating the generational
effects of residential school and colonisation.
The government removing an entire generation from their home upsets the continuity of a
family for decades to come. Discussion surrounding the philosophy of the residential
school syndrome and the 60’s scoop provided a series of subsequent debates and issues.
The concept of a government assuming the role of a parent is wrong. This concept is
especially troubling for Aboriginal populations who are still recovering from when the
government took their children away to residential school and through the 60’s Scoop.
There are currently more children in care in BC than children in residential school at the
height of the residential school era.
OUTCOMES:
Support services need to be in place that include pre-natal health classes and
parenting classes, and continue after the birth of the baby.
An Aboriginal parents’ telephone hotline that will serve as a resource for parents
experiencing particularly difficult times.
ABORIGINAL FOSTER CARE
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Aboriginal Foster Care.
Many participants feel that the province of British Columbia is lacking quality Aboriginal
foster care homes and is further traumatising these displaced children by isolating them
from their culture.
When an Aboriginal foster home comes available, an Aboriginal child in need of care will be
sent to that home first no matter how far that is from the mother. This creates a large
barrier for the mother who has to meet Ministry of Child and Family Development (MCFD)
requirements for the return of her children and find the time and resources to see her
children.
OUTCOMES:
MCFD should provide a Cultural Care Plan for Aboriginal children who are forced
into a care situation and are not able to be placed with an Aboriginal family.
There needs to be a campaign targeting healthy Aboriginal families to encourage
them to become foster parents. The approval process for Aboriginal foster parents
needs to be promoted as well as streamlined. MCFD needs to set targets for
Aboriginal foster parents for each region and actively seek Aboriginal foster homes.
GRANDPARENTING
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Grandparenting.
It is a reality that some Aboriginal grandparents are taking care of their grandchildren when
their children are unable to do so. While grandparents traditionally are very involved with
raising their grandchildren, many caretaking situations are highly stressful for the
grandparents. In addition, some grandparents lack parenting skills as a result of their
experience of residential school and the 60’s scoop.
MCFD assists non-related foster parents with all the means necessary to assist in the
childrearing; it should review how it could more adequately assist grandparents in raising
their grandchildren. Home support, respite care and financial aid would greatly aid
grandparents. The grandparents should receive support and be given the same benefits
and status as a foster parent.
OUTCOME:
Ministry supported programs that assist grandparents in parenting their
grandchildren ranging from financial support to respite care, transportation logistics
and recreational inclusion.
STRENGTH  BALANCE  HONOUR
REBUILDING COMMUNITY
Following is a summary of themes and comments that emerged from the Roundtables on
the topic of Rebuilding Community.
Women operate at the highest capacity when they feel as though they belong to a
community of like-minded individuals. Aboriginal women have traditionally worked together
for the betterment of their community and diminishing this role makes Aboriginal women
feel disconnected from their culture. It is important to Aboriginal women as well as the
future of their people to feel proud of who they are. Aboriginal women need to find a way to
create that sense of community again.
There was considerable discussion about loss of identity among Aboriginal women.
Women living away from their reservations (if they are from a reservation) can feel
disconnected from their culture.
The empowerment of women can only happen by women, for women.
OUTCOMES:
Establishment of various Healing Lodges around the province that are operated by
Aboriginal women and are a place that Aboriginal women can receive services or
come to heal. This would be a building that serves as meeting place for women who
want or need a link to their community.
The further promotion and establishment of Aboriginal women’s roundtables that
provide an opportunity for women to speak openly and honestly about their current
situations and to know that other women are experiencing the same challenges or
successes. Aboriginal women need assurance that governments will be listening to
their concerns and making positive legislative and policy decisions.
Rediscovery camps that allow families to become closer to their lands, cultures and
languages. The teaching of medicine and traditional arts also strengthen women and
their families. We also need more language programmes available to women and
children.
CONCLUSION
Traditionally, Aboriginal women have held a position of authority and power within their
communities. Colonisation, residential schools and the Indian Act have greatly diminished
this role. Many Roundtable Participants felt that these institutions had also turned
Aboriginal men against their own women by implementing sexist laws and poor
accountability structures giving women few options.
Aboriginal women deserve to be safe, healthy and respected and they will continue to
organise until their voice is heard.
The Aboriginal Women’s Provincial Roundtable discussions, hosted by the United Native
Nations in cooperation with the Pacific Association of First Nations Women, are another
step in the direction of equality.
The Aboriginal women who participated and offered insight into their realities deserve to
see the outcomes that they have requested; a woman’s voice must not only be heard but
also acted upon.
Heeding the advice of Aboriginal women means bravely addressing their expressed
concerns now. This plan must be results based and should be reviewed and updated
annually in cooperation with Aboriginal women. An Aboriginal Women’s Council is an ideal
lead in ensuring recommendations are fulfilled.
ABORIGINAL WOMEN’S PROVINCIAL ROUNDTABLE
PAGE
PAGE 19
PAGE 6
PAGE 1
Health  Safety  Wellness
Equality  Empowerment
Strength Balance  Culture
Province-wide dialogue sessions with Aboriginal Women hosted by the UNITED NATIVE NATIONS in
cooperation with the Pacific Association of First Nations Women and funded by the Ministry of Community
Services.
May 2007
Provincial Roundtable on Aboriginal Women’s Issues