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MOHAWK VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
UTICA AND ROME, NEW YORK
COURSE NUMBER BI102
GENERAL BIOLOGY 2
(4 CREDIT HOURS)
REVIEWED MAY 2006
RICHARD THOMAS
COURSE OUTLINE
Course Number:
Course Title:
BI102
4 Credit Hours
General Biology 2
I. Course Description
General Biology 2 is a continuation of General Biology 1.
Topics emphasized are classical and molecular genetics,
evolution and speciation with a unit on invertebrate
structure and evolution. Laboratory experience is as
described in General Biology 1. Three dissections are
performed to expose the student to the variety of
structures found in the animal kingdom. Two laboratory
exercises investigate the tools used by molecular
geneticists in the field of genetic engineering.
Prerequisites: BI101 (General Biology 1) or permission of
Life Science Department Head.
II. Organization and Procedure
A.
Time Allotment (4 credit hours)
1.
2.
B.
Placement
1.
C.
Lecture: 3 hours per week for 15 weeks
Laboratory: 2 hours per week for 15 weeks
Spring Semester
Facilities
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Lecture room sufficient for 40 students
Complete laboratory facility for 15 students
Biological reference materials
Visual aids and desktop presentation materials
Facilities for preparation and storage of
biological materials
D.
Teaching Methods
1.
2.
3.
E.
Lecture/Discussion/Desktop presentation
Supervised laboratory experiences
Laboratory demonstrations
Evaluation
1.
Classwork
a.
b.
c.
2.
2-3
3 hours
Laboratory Work
a.
b.
c.
F.
Hour examinations:
Class discussion
Final examination:
Laboratory quizzes and/or reports
Laboratory final examination: 1 hour
written and/or practical (at instructor's
discretion)
Labeled sketches of dissections/slides of
invertebrate specimen
Instructional requirements, grading and attendance
policy is provided by the individual instructor.
III. Required Materials
A.
Solomon, Berg, and Martin.
Thomson. 2006.
Biology.
Seventh Edition.
B.
Jubenville/Thomas - General Biology Laboratory Manual,
Kendall Hunt. 1998
IV. Student Outcomes:
A.
The student will be able to describe the meiotic
process and explain how the meiotic process relates to
classical Mendelian genetics.
B.
The student will be able to describe the Mendelian
laws of segregation and independent assortment and be
able to use these laws to solve monohybrid and
dihybrid genetic crosses.
V.
C.
The student will be able to solve genetic problems
involving the principles of linkage and sex-linked
traits, and be able to use the concept of
recombination data to map a chromosome's genetic loci.
D.
The student will be able to describe the structure of
the DNA molecule and explain how its structure is
fundamental to its role as the genetic molecule.
E.
The student will be able to explain how information
stored in a cell's chromosomes directs activities
within the cell's cytoplasm through the processes of
transcription and translation.
F.
The student will be able to describe how the tools of
the bio-technologist are used to produce, isolate, and
clone recombinant DNA.
G.
The student will be able to explain how Darwin's
theory of evolution and the concept of natural
selection is used to explain descent with
modification.
H.
The student will be able to discuss how evolutionary
forces work with population genetics to drive the
process of speciation.
I.
The student will be able to describe the major
evolutionary trends seen in the evolution of the
animal kingdom.
Laboratory Objectives
A.
The student will perform genetic crosses with Sordaria
fimicola generating data used to analyze basic
crossover frequencies and linkage studies.
B.
The student will build models of DNA to relate its
three dimensional shape to its biological functions.
C.
The student will perform various dissections of
selected invertebrate organisms to relate their gross
anatomical structures to their microscopic anatomy.
D.
The student will apply techniques used by genetic
engineers to samples of DNA to generate data which
will be the basis of student laboratory reports.
E.
The student will learn the basic differences in
structure that are used to separate the Fungal kingdom
into its different divisions. They will then assign
unknown specimen to their proper division based upon
morphological traits.
F.
The student will sketch specimen of five increasingly
complex animal phyla illustrating the major grades in
body “plans” which have driven the evolutionary trends
of the animal world.
G.
The student will be able to assign animal specimen to
their respective phyla based upon their morphological
traits.
H.
The student will manipulate a simulation of a breeding
population of rabbits to demonstrate the principles of
natural selection.
MOHAWK VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
UTICA AND ROME, NEW YORK
General Biology 2 - Course Outline
Text:
Solomon, Berg, and Martin, Biology, 7th
edition, Thomson. 2005
Laboratory Text:
Jubenville & Thomas - General Biology
Laboratory Manual, Kendall Hunt. 1998
Lecture:
Weeks
Topics
Chapter
Chromosomes, Mitosis, and Meiosis
09
2-3
The Basic Principles of Heredity
10
4-5
DNA: The Carrier of Genetic Information
11
6
Gene Expression
12
7
Gene Regulation
13
8
DNA Technologies
14
9
Introduction to Darwinian Evolution
17
10
Evolutionary Change in Populations
18
11
Speciation and Macroevolution
19
12
The Animal Kingdom: An Introduction to
Animal Diversity
28
13-14
The Animal Kingdom: The Protostomes
29
15
The Animal Kingdom: The Deuterostomes
30
1
General Biology 2 Laboratory Schedule
Week
Topic
1
An Introduction to Genetics-Corn Model
2
Continue Corn Genetics and Start the Sordaria
Genetic Cross
3
An Introduction to the Fungi
4
Analyze Sordaria Results
5
Nucleic Acid lab
6
An Introduction to Recombinant DNA Technology
7
Recombinant DNA Technology cont.
8
Analysis and evaluation of weeks 6 & 7
9
Evolution: Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium
10
Animal Development
11
An Investigation of Porifera and Coelenterata
12
An Investigation of Platyhelminthes and
Aschelminthes
13
Annelidae
14
Echinodermata
15
Animal Phyla Diversity
5/24/06