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FORT SASKATCHEWAN HIGH SCHOOL
STUDENT COURSE OUTLINE AND
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: PHYSICS 20 – FALL 2015
Questions or concerns: Please contact Art Packer at Fort High. Email: Arthur.Packer@eips.ca
Phone: 780 998 3751
TEXT: Pearson Physics - Ackroyd et al
GOALS FOR SECONDARY SCIENCE
Science education generally, and Physics 20 in particular, will:
 Encourage students to develop a critical sense of wonder and curiosity about scientific and
technological endeavors
 Enable students to use science and technology to acquire new knowledge and solve problems so that
they may improve the quality of their lives and the lives of others
 Prepare students to critically address science-related societal, economic, ethical and environmental
issues
 Provide students with a foundation in science that creates opportunities for them to pursue
progressively higher levels of study, prepares them for science-related occupations and engages them
in science-related hobbies appropriate to their interests and abilities
 Develop in students of varying aptitudes and interests a knowledge of the wide spectrum of careers
related to science, technology and the environment
COURSE OUTLINE
UNIT - TEXT REFERENCE
1 - Kinematics; Mathematics of Physics (supplemental
material) & chapters 1 & 2
2 - Dynamics; chapters 3 & 4
Midterm exam can replace marks from unit 1 or 2 exam,
if higher, otherwise not counted
3 - Circular Motion, Work and Energy; chapters 5 & 6
4 - Oscillatory (Vibrational) Motion and Mechanical
Waves; chapters 7 & 8
Course review exam mark can replace any unit exam
mark, if higher; otherwise not counted
*Percent of semester spent on each unit; relative weighting of
summative assessments for learning objectives in that unit and
relative final exam weighting (see Physics 20 Learning
Outcomes following)
APPROX. NO. OF
CLASSES (incl. exams)
Content/exam weighting*
24 (23%)
APPROXIMATE
COMPLETION OR
WRITING DATE
October 1
20 (18%)
1
November 3
November 5
19 (15%)
18 (14%)
December 8
January 14
1
January 18
82 classes
Final exam (30%)
January ____
FORMATIVE AND SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Part of student evaluation includes summative assessment tasks, which are used to determine the degree of
mastery of learning outcomes and to provide ongoing and final student course grades; they are generally
intended to provide information to the teacher rather than to the student. A second part of evaluation
involves formative assessment tasks, where students and teachers can use the results of tasks to revisit
topics or review understandings.
Summative assessment for Physics 20 will consist of:
– a unit exam and at least one chapter quiz for each unit; some lab reports and other assignments
may also be used (students will be informed ahead of time)
– a midterm exam which can improve a student’s mark on either of the first two unit exams (will
otherwise not be counted)
– a course review exam, which can improve a student’s mark on any of the four unit exams (will
otherwise not be counted)
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 1
– a final exam covering the entire course (the final exam will provide a last opportunity for
students to demonstrate continuing mastery of major concepts and ideas from the whole of
Physics 20 – will count for 30% of student’s final course grade)
Formative assessment for Physics 20 may include (but may not be limited to) teacher-marked and peerevaluated quizzes and assignments, some lab write-ups, and other oral and written tasks, as well as daily
activities, questioning in class, homework completion and other assignments, and student self-checks.
Some of these may be reported in Gradebook using a numerical version of the EPAL system
(Excellent/Proficient/Acceptable/Limited) reported as grades 4, 3, 2, or 1, respectively, or as a mark out of
a possible total. Formative learning tasks may involve recorded marks and/or indicators of completeness,
timeliness and proficiency, but these marks and indicators will not be used to determine ongoing or final
student course grades.
STUDENT GRADES AND ASSESSMENT DETAILS
Grades will be based on the summative assessments noted above. Within each unit, the unit exam will
count for approximately 80% of the unit mark. Units will be weighted as indicated in the chart above. Each
weighting will be applied to the total of summative assessments in that unit, and these values will be
combined to determine a current grade.
After all students have written a particular unit exam, and as time permits, the exam will be returned to
students in class and discussed. At this time, students should note learning outcomes that they have not
mastered, and that require further study. The exams will then be collected and filed. At the end of the
semester, students may request to review their unit exams, in school and under supervision. (Students who
miss the day an exam is discussed may go over their exam in their teacher’s presence at a mutually
convenient time.) All other written assessment tasks will be returned to students for their use. Because the
study of physics is cumulative to a significant extent, previous skills and abilities will unavoidably be tested
on each exam. However, each unit exam will concentrate on the outcomes of that single unit.
Individual records of all summative and formative activities will be available to students and parents on
Gradebook through PowerSchool, as they are completed, submitted and graded. Current (calculated) grades
will be posted starting at the end of Unit 1 (approximately October 6) and will remain available until the
end of the semester; note that current grades will be updated only at the end of each unit, although marks
will be entered regularly. Students desiring a grade calculation before calculated grades are posted may
request a Progress Report from Mr. Packer.
MISSED EXAMS AND OTHER ASSESSMENTS
Missed unit exams will be written as soon as possible after a student returns to class. As unit exams require
more time than is available at lunch, and must be written at a single sitting, missed exams will usually be
written during class time, in the hallway outside the classroom. (Unfortunately, the library is not considered
a supervised space, so cannot be used for missed exams.) Students with spares may write missed exams
during spare blocks. Students may be asked to write missed quizzes (in class or at lunch), or the quiz mark
may be initially exempted and later replaced by the unit exam mark, at the teacher’s discretion. Students
who are away from school for one or more classes are encouraged to contact Mr. Packer by phone at 780998-3751, or through email at arthur.packer@eips.ca , or through Fort High’s website.
For students who miss classes when labs are being performed, the teacher may request that the student
obtain needed data from his or her lab partners and complete the lab, or complete the lab outside of class
time, if this is feasible. Alternatively, the lab may not be counted, at the discretion of the teacher.
STUDENTS WHO MISS A LAB SHOULD BRING THIS FACT TO THE TEACHER’S ATTENTION.
Question assignments and individual lab write-ups intended as summative/formative assessments will have
due dates, with the assignment due at the start of that class. Late submissions may result in a 10% mark
deduction for each day late; late labs and assignments may not be accepted and may receive a mark of zero
if not submitted before the lab or assignment is returned to the rest of the class. Individual circumstances
(illness, etc.) may be considered by the teacher when applying this policy.
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 2
BINDERS AND NOTES
Students should maintain an organized binder for physics. Binders should include: all notes provided from
the board or overhead, any notes (or exercises and examples) provided in photocopied form, returned
assignments/quizzes/homework, and completed problems and exercises, properly checked and corrected.
Binders may be arranged in any appropriate manner, but should be organized so that material in a particular
unit can be easily located. At a minimum, note pages or handouts should be dated. Summaries, extra
problems from supplementary sources, etc. that have been completed independently are excellent additions
to student notes. Student binders should be available for the teacher (or an administrator) to review if
requested. Such a review may constitute a formative assessment task.
CALCULATORS
Students are required to have their own calculators for work in class and for exams – calculators may not be
shared for exams and quizzes. Calculators on cell phones music players are not acceptable for class or
exam use. Graphing calculators may be cleared prior to exams. CALCULATORS WHICH CANNOT BE
CLEARED MAY NOT BE USED FOR EXAMS. While a graphing calculator (TI-84 Plus or equivalent) is
certainly appropriate for Physics 20, an inexpensive scientific calculator (has sine, cosine – retails for under
$10) is MORE THAN ADEQUATE. Students who repeatedly use their graphing calculators for games, or
other activities not related to solving assigned problems in physics may be allowed to bring only a scientific
calculator to class.
RESOURCES FOR PHYSICS
Students seeking ways of improving their grades in Physics should consult Mr. Packer’s e-teacher page,
Success in Physics (accessible through the Elk Island Public Schools website, then Fort High’s website.)
Outside resources can also be obtained from bookstores, including the Key book, or the Physics 20
Workbook used in some Edmonton schools. Informal or professional tutoring is always an option as well;
although professional physics tutors are not common in the Fort Saskatchewan area, university students are
available as tutors for reasonable fees.
Physics 20 Learning Outcomes
These outcomes are drawn from the Alberta Program of Studies for Physics 20, correlated to each chapter
of the prescribed text, Pearson Physics. The numbering of outcomes is not the same as the Alberta Program
of Studies. Numbering is formatted as: chapter number: outcome number: knowledge/application (k) or
science, technology and society (sts). For example, 2-1sts refers to the first science, technology and society
outcome from chapter 2, and 3-1k is the first knowledge/application outcome from chapter 3.
Listed outcomes indicate what students must know and be able to do in order to successfully complete
Physics 20. Students should use this list of outcomes to judge their own understanding of the objective of
each unit, with some cautions:
 The outcomes do not indicate the depth of understanding required for each – the difficulty level of
questions students should be able to answer related to that outcome.
 The term quantitatively may mean minimal or extensive calculational requirements for that
outcome, involving everything from substitution of values into a simple, provided formula (or use
of an appropriate proportionality related to a formula or concept) to derivation of a needed
formula, rearrangement as needed, and application to a variety of situations.
 Many outcomes are stated in a highly concise form, relative to the time needed to cover required
to cover and achieve the outcome.
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 3
Unit I: Kinematics
General Outcome: Describe motion in terms of displacement, time, velocity and acceleration
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 1
1-1k
Define, qualitatively and quantitatively,
displacement, velocity and acceleration
1-2k
Define operationally, compare and contrast scalar
and vector quantities
1-3k
Explain, qualitatively and quantitatively, uniform
and uniformly accelerated motion when provided
with written descriptions and numerical and
graphical data
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 1
1-1sts
Explain that the goal of science is knowledge about
the natural world
1-2sts
Explain that the process for technological
development includes testing and evaluating
designs and prototypes on the basis of established
criteria
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 2
2-1k
Explain, quantitatively, two-dimensional motion in
a horizontal or vertical plane using vector
components
2-2k
Interpret, quantitatively, the motion of one object
relative to another using displacement and velocity
vectors
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 2
2-1sts
Explain that the goal of science is knowledge about
the natural world
2-2sts
Explain that scientific knowledge is subject to
change as new evidence becomes apparent and as
laws and theories are tested and subsequently
restricted, revised or reinforced
Unit II: Dynamics
General Outcome 1: Explain the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on velocity
General Outcome 2: Explain that gravitational effects extend throughout the Universe
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 3
3-1k
Explain that a non-zero net force causes a change
in velocity
3-2k
Apply Newton’s first law of motion to explain,
qualitatively, an object’s state of rest or
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 4
uniform motion
3-3k
Apply Newton’s second law of motion to explain,
qualitatively, the relationships among net force,
mass and acceleration
3-4k
Apply Newton’s third law of motion, qualitatively,
to interactions between two objects, recognizing
that the two forces, equal in magnitude and
opposite in direction, act on different bodies
3-5k
Explain, qualitatively and quantitatively, static and
kinetic force of friction acting on an object
3-6k
Calculate the resultant force, or its constituents,
acting on an object, using the addition of vectors
graphically and algebraically by using vector
components
3-7k
Apply Newton’s laws of motion to solve,
algebraically, linear motion problems in horizontal,
vertical and inclined planes near the surface of
Earth, ignoring air resistance
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 3
3-1sts
Explain that the goal of technology is to provide
solutions to practical problems
3-2sts
Explain that science and technology develop to
meet practical needs
3-3sts
Explain that science develops through
experimentation
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 4
4-1k
Identify the gravitational force as one of the
fundamental forces in nature
4-2k
Describe, qualitatively and quantitatively,
Newton’s law of universal gravitation
4-3k
Explain, qualitatively, the principles pertinent to
the Cavendish experiment used to determine the
universal gravitational constant G
4-4k
Define field as a concept that replaces action at a
distance and apply the definition to
describe gravitational effects
4-5k
Relate, using the universal law of gravitation,
qualitatively and quantitatively, the gravitational
constant to the local value of the acceleration due
to gravity
4-6k
Predict, quantitatively, differences in weight of
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 5
objects on different planets
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 4
4-1sts
Explain that concepts, models and theories are
often used in interpreting and explaining
observations and in predicting future observations
Unit III: Circular Motion, Work and Energy
General Outcome 1: Explain circular motion using Newton’s laws of motion
General Outcome 2: Understand that in an isolated system, energy is transferred from one object
to another whenever work is done
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 5
5-1k
Describe uniform circular motion as a special case
of two-dimensional motion
5-2k
Explain, qualitatively and quantitatively, that the
acceleration in uniform circular motion is directed
toward the centre of the circle
5-3k
Explain, quantitatively, the relationships among
speed, frequency, period and radius for circular
motion
5-4k
Explain, qualitatively, uniform circular motion in
terms of Newton’s laws of motion
5-5k
Explain, quantitatively, planetary, natural and
artificial satellite motion, using circular motion to
approximate elliptical orbits
5-6k
Predict the mass of a celestial body from the orbital
data of a satellite in uniform circular
motion around the celestial body
5-7k
Explain, qualitatively, how Kepler’s laws were
used in the development of Newton’s universal law
of gravitation
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 5
5-1sts
Explain that the process of scientific inquiry
includes analyzing the evidence and providing
explanations based upon scientific theories and
concepts
5-2sts
Illustrate how science and technology are
developed to meet societal needs and expand
human capabilities
5-3sts
Analyze the principles and applications of circular
motion in daily situations
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 6
6-1k
Use the law of conservation of energy to explain
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 6
the behaviour of objects within isolated systems
6-2k
Describe the energy transformations in isolated and
non-isolated systems using the work-energy
theorem, together with kinetic energy, gravitational
potential energy, and spring potential energy
6-3k
Define mechanical energy as the sum of kinetic and
potential energy
6-4k
Recall work as a measure of the mechanical energy
transferred and power as the rate of doing work
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 6
6-1sts
Explain that models and theories are used to
interpret and explain observations
6-2sts
Explain that technology cannot solve all problems
6-3sts
Express opinions on the support found in Canadian
society for science and technology measures that
work towards a sustainable society
Unit IV: Oscillatory Motion and Mechanical Waves
General Outcome 1: Describe and examine the set of conditions necessary for oscillatory motion
General Outcome 2: General Outcome 2: Describe the properties of mechanical waves and explain
how they transmit energy
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 7
7-1k
Define oscillatory motion in terms of period and
frequency
7-2k
Define simple harmonic motion as being due to a
restoring force that is directly proportional and
opposite to the displacement of an object from an
equilibrium position
7-3k
Explain the quantitative relationships among
displacement, acceleration, velocity and time for
simple harmonic motion
7-4k
Define mechanical resonance
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 7
7-1sts
Explain that the goal of science is knowledge about
the natural world
Outcomes for Knowledge – Chapter 8
8-1k
Describe mechanical waves as particles of a
medium that are moving in simple harmonic
motion
8-2k
Compare and contrast energy transmission by
matter that moves and by waves
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 7
8-3k
Define longitudinal and transverse waves in terms
of the direction of motion of the medium
particles in relation to the direction of propagation
of the wave
8-4k
Define the terms wavelength, wave velocity,
period, frequency, amplitude, wave front and ray as
they apply to describing transverse and longitudinal
waves
8-5k
Describe how the speed of a wave depends on the
characteristics of the medium
8-6k
Predict, quantitatively, and verify the effects of
changing one or a combination of the
variables in the universal wave equation (v = fλ)
8-7k
Explain, qualitatively, the phenomenon of
reflection as exhibited by mechanical waves
8-8k
Explain, qualitatively, the conditions for
constructive and destructive interference of waves
and for acoustical resonance
8-9k
Explain, qualitatively and quantitatively, the
Doppler effect on a stationary observer with a
moving source
Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society – Chapter 8
8-1sts
Explain that the goal of technology is to provide
solutions to practical problems
Skill Outcomes – Developed Throughout Physics 20
Initiating and Planning
Performing and Recording
Analyzing and Interpreting
Communication and Teamwork
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
S-1
Ask questions about observed
relationships and plan
investigations of questions, ideas,
problems and issues
S-2
Conduct investigations into
relationships between and among
observable variables and use a
broad range of tools and
techniques to gather and record
data and information
S-3
Analyze data and apply
mathematical and conceptual
models to develop and assess
possible solutions
S-4
Work as members of a team in
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 8
addressing problems and apply the
skills and conventions of science
in communicating information and
ideas and in assessing results
Attitude Outcomes – Developed Throughout Physics 20
Interest In Science
Mutual Respect
Scientific Inquiry
Collaboration
Stewardship
Safety
A-1
Show interest in science-related
questions and issues and pursue
personal interests and career
possibilities within science-related
fields
A-2
Appreciate that scientific
understanding evolves from the
interaction of ideas involving people
with different views and backgrounds
A-3
Seek and apply evidence when
evaluating alternative approaches to
investigations, problems and issues
A-4
Work collaboratively in planning and
carrying out investigations, as well as
in generating and evaluating ideas
A-5
Demonstrate sensitivity and
responsibility in pursuing a balance
between the needs of human and a
sustainable environment
A-6
Show concern for safety in planning,
carrying out and reviewing activities
PHYSICS 20N COURSE OUTLINE
AUGUST 2015 - PAGE 9