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Review of Grey Sources on mLearning
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Enhancing Nurses Access for Care Quality and Knowledge through
Technology (ENACQKT)
3. Country/countries: The Caribbean
4. Type of device and format: PDA
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://www.idrc.ca/en/ev-139858-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html
http://www.unfoundation.org/global-issues/technology/mhealth-report.html Page - 57
8. Summary: In order for health workers to provide effective patient care, access to timely information
is essential. In the Caribbean, nurses often lack basic resources, work remotely, and are isolated, which
makes data sharing challenging. Enhancing Nurses Access for Care Quality and Knowledge through
Technology (ENACQKT) empowers nurses by providing training and other services via PDAs. A key
component of ENACQKT is building nurses’ capacity through technology instruction, giving them the
means to access healthcare applications through the PDAs provided by the program. This enhances
professional development and improves quality of care for patients. Project principals report several
achievements, including time savings for nurses and greater access to information, particularly in the
areas of medication and treatment support. The project also reports success in imparting a sense of
empowerment to the nurses in terms of speaking to physicians about conditions, treatments, and
diagnosis.
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Organization: N/A
Document name: Healthline
Country/countries: Pakistan
Type of device and format: Mobile phones/ Landlines
Type of document: case
Contact info: N/A
Link: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~healthline
http://www.unfoundation.org/global-issues/technology/mhealth-report.html Page - 57
8. Summary: One of the chief obstacles to mHealth solutions is literacy, or the lack thereof. To ensure
that semi-literate community health workers have access to critical information, Microsoft and others are
developing HealthLine, a speech recognition-based information system. The solution is based on
Microsoft Speech Server2007 beta software. The menu-driven program can be accessed via landlines or
mobile phones. Callers specify a topic (or disease) and are walked through a set of menus until they reach
the information they are seeking. The information is then read to them—from a prerecorded message— in
their local language. HealthLine was tested among a group of low-literate maternal and child health
community health workers in Pakistan in mid-2007. It will continue to be tested in the field with the
results informing new features, functionality, and enhancements. Ideally, the solution will be scaled
across Pakistan for maximum impact.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Mobile HIV/AIDS Support
3. Country/countries: Uganda
4. Type of device and format: PDA
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
Interagency Working Group for mHealth
5/5/10
Page 1
7. Link: http://www.universitiesireland.ie/pubs/report0306.pdf
http://www.unfoundation.org/global-issues/technology/mhealth-report.html Page - 58
8. Summary: ‘Training the trainers’—providing healthcare workers in the field with accessible and
reliable medical information— is essential for improved health delivery in the developing world. Trinity
College Dublin (TCD) is collaborating with the medical school at Makerere Hospital in Kampala,
Uganda to explore the potential advantages of using PDAs in HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The
project aims to provide high-quality medical information
and advice to healthcare workers in Uganda and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. After an initial needs
assessment, the project leaders—a group of academic clinicians from TCD, the Dublin Institute of
Technology, and North American universities—developed a prototype of a training program on the
clinical care, research, and prevention of HIV/AIDS. The program was to be evaluated by a select group
of healthcare workers in the field. Results of the testing and evaluation have not yet been published.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Primary Healthcare Nursing Promotion Program
3. Country/countries: Guatemala
4. Type of device and format: Mobile phone/Telephone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: Also contact: Isabel Lobos – teleeducacionenec@hotmail.com
7. Link: http://www.enecav.edu.gt/
http://www.unfoundation.org/global-issues/technology/mhealth-report.html Page - 58
8. Summary: Nursing shortages, especially in rural areas, are common in developing countries (and
increasingly in developed ones as well). The National School for Nurses of Coban in Guatemala created
the Primary Healthcare Nursing Promotion Program to increase the number of nursing personnel
available to work in rural areas. One component of this program is a virtual nursing course, which is
taught via a combination of telephone and two-way data communications. Of the first virtual nursing
course graduates in 2004, a subset became ‘community tele-facilitators.’ These tele-facilitators were each
given a mobile (or satellite) phone, which they used to link their rural communities with health
specialists in urban areas. The pilot test was launched in 2005 in five municipalities in northern
Guatemala and covered 150 communities with a total population of 45,000. At this time, there appears
to be continued progress on the virtual nursing training component, but it is not certain whether the
tele-facilitator program continued after the initial pilot test.
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Organization: N/A
Document name: The Uganda Health Information Network (UHIN)
Country/countries: Uganda
Type of device and format: PDA
Type of document: case
Contact info: N/A
Link: http://www.comminit.com/en/node/119535/347
http://www.unfoundation.org/global-issues/technology/mhealth-report.html Page - 59
8. Summary: Uganda has become a laboratory for efforts to improve two-way data flows between
health workers and government officials, and the Uganda Health Information Network (UHIN) is a
prime example of these efforts. UHIN uses PDAs to collect data and to provide continuing medical
education services to physicians. The PDAs send and receive messages via infrared beams that send the
signals to battery-operated access points. The program was launched in 2003 and currently 350 PDAs
are being used. They are connected to 20 access points in different districts of Uganda. Positive impacts
were recorded early on: “The network delivered a 25% savings in the first 6 months...health workers
using the handheld technology now have better job satisfaction and [it] is contributing to staff
retention...” The UHIN is planning an analysis to determine if the project has had an impact on health
outcomes such as healthcare planning, resource allocation, and delivery.
Interagency Working Group for mHealth
5/5/10
Page 2
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: GUIDE: Getting Medical Information into the Hands of Community Health
Workers
3. Country/countries: South Africa
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://mobileactive.org/case-studies/guide-getting-medical-information-hands-community- health workers
8. Summary: In rural locations, doctors and nurses are often acting in isolation, separated from the
medical community and easy access to information. GUIDE essentially takes medical and treatment
documents and makes them accessible for users with small devices by converting the documents into
HTML, which makes the documents legible on any browser that supports HTML. Projects goals:
Create a mobile library of medical information that is accessible anywhere, at any time, over a mobile
phone; Change existing attitudes about technology in developing countries; Create a self-sustaining
medical information system.
What Worked: Rapid pick-up of the project by the community health care workers; A trickle- down
dissemination effect as the nurses with phones shared the resources with other health workers who
were not part of the pilot; Partnerships with local organizations who provided documents for
conversation, and local technical support
What Didn’t Work: Overcoming sexist views about women and technology; The original plan to put
the program on PDAs was scrapped, and was moved to smartphones in order to take advantage of
Internet access; Navigating health buraucracies in the implementation.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Mobile Phones’ Potential to Address Information and Communication Needs of
Healthcare Workers in Isolated Rural Areas in Peru
3. Country/countries: Peru
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://www.gg.rhul.ac.uk/ict4d/workingpapers/crespo.pdf
8. Summary: The aim of this paper is to present the main findings of the interviews and
observation undertaken in health locations in rural areas of Peru, aimed at exploring the
application of mobile technology for health in isolated areas, and thereby to provide wider
reflections about the use of mobile phones to improve health delivery in isolated areas in
developing countries. It also reflects on methodological complexities, particularly those related t o the
application of online research methods, through the experience gained during the research.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: CommCare
3. Country/countries: Tanzania, Sub-Saharan Africa
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://www.dimagi.com/commcare/
http://mobileactive.org/mobile-tools/commcare
8. Summary: Dimagi and D-Tree international are leading CommCare, a mobile-phone based
application enables community health workers (CWHs) to provide better, more efficient care while also
enabling better supervision and coordination of community health programs. Each CHW will have a
phone running the CommCare software that will assist them in managing household visits and
Interagency Working Group for mHealth
5/5/10
Page 3
planning their day. CommCare will collect and report data that will help monitor and evaluate
community health programs themselves. Each CHW will have a phone running the CommCare
software that will assist them to manage household visits and plan their day. Using CommCare,
community health workers also collect and report data that will help them monitor and evaluate
community health programs. There are many ways in which CommCare can support community health
programs. For example, CHWs can be encouraged to visit every woman who gives birth as soon as
possible after delivery. CommCare guides the CHW through a questionnaire to collect data on the
birth and the condition of the infant that includes questions to assess the infant and mother for key
danger signs. In addition to sending the data back to a central repository to assist with vital
registration, the system will also guide the CHW to urgently refer an infant or mother in need of
medical attention, thus addressing one of the key barriers to reducing neonatal morality.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: HIV Health Information Access using Spoken Dialogue Systems:
Touchtone vs. Speech
3. Country/countries: Botswana
4. Type of device and format: Telephone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://www.scribd.com/doc/14234869/ICTD-2009-Proceedings
8. Summary: This paper presents our work in the design of a SDS for the provision of health
information to caregivers of HIV positive children. We specifically address the frequently debated
question of input modality in speech systems; touchtone versus speech input, in a new context of low
literacy users and a health information service. We discuss our experiences and fieldwork which
includes needs assessment interviews, focus group sessions, and user studies in Botswana with semi and
low-literate users. Our results indicate user preference for touchtone over speech input although both
systems were comparable in performance based on objective metrics.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Technology for Early Disease Detection and Rapid Disaster Response:
InSTEDD
3. Country/countries: Cambodia, Vietnam
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone and Computer
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: mj marcus InSTEDD T4H 02 29 08.pdf
8. Summary: This presentation provides an overview of the InSTEDD Global Platform for Early
Disease Detection, Reponse, and Evaluation. The summary includes reviews the proportion of
infections detected and proposes addressing these challenges by adopting a social network and
cognitive model approach. The approach facilitates: Early identification of potential health threats
and verification, assessment, and investigation of threats in order to recommend measures (public
health and other) to control them. The presentation describes the indicator and event-based hybrid
surveillance approach and gives two examples of collaborative testing in the field.
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Organization: N/A
Document name: Mobile Learning for Health Care Workers in Peru
Country/countries: Peru
Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
Type of document: case
Contact info: N/A
Link: http://www.ml4d.org/kb/DNs/hcw-peru
Interagency Working Group for mHealth
5/5/10
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8. Summary: Problem / Aim: As mobile devices have been on the rise in Peru and they enable people
to stay in contact with one another, we wondered whether mobile learning in combination with social
media might provide a solution for the lack of training for HCW scattered across the country.
Situation: As a Health Care Worker (HCW) you abide by the Hippocrates’ oath, you want to provide
the best possible care at the best of your human possibilities. Unfortunately, nature and the global
society we live in provide some challenges. In Peru the HCWs live in a challenging professional setting:
HIV/AIDS cases are increasing and scattered around the country but not many HCWs know how to
deal with it correctly, there is very limited to no access to the latest updated medical information on
the topic, many HCWs need to be emerged in basic HIV/AIDS information, there is no infrastructure
to build an online Community of Practice (CoP), and although there are internet cafés in the major
cities, the Internet connectivity is limited. Furthermore far from all HCWs had a personal computer.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Satellife
3. Country/countries: Kenya, Uganda, Ghana
4. Type of device and format: PDA
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link:
http://www.unpan.org/Library/KnowledgeBaseofICTforPublicService/tabid/826/ctl/ProductDetail/
mid/2182/ProductID/24/language/en-US/Default.aspx
8.
Summary: In Ghana, community volunteers have been using PDAs to collect data as part of
a measles vaccination program. In Kenya, medical students were equipped with PDAs loaded with
relevant information about their studies in obstetrics/gynecology, internal medicine, and
pediatrics. In Uganda, practicing physicians were given PDAs containing basic reference material as
part of their continuing medical education.
The Ghana project yielded compelling evidence of the value of PDAs for data collection and reporting.
Data from 2,400 field surveys were submitted to the implementing agency by mid-day following a
vaccination campaign in a particular location. They were analysed, and a report was prepared for the
Ministry of Health by the end of the day. Previously, data entry would have taken 40 hours using paper
and pencil surveys.
The Kenya and Uganda pilots demonstrated the value of using PDAs for information dissemination. In
Uganda, 95 percent of physicians reported that using the reference materials over a three-month period
improved their ability to treat patients effectively. This included improvements in diagnosis, drug
selection, and overall treatment. In Kenya, the majority of students actively used the treatment
guidelines and referred to the medical references and textbooks stored on the PDA during their clinical
practice.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: TRACnet
3. Country/countries: Rwanda
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://www.columbia.edu/itc/sipa/nelson/newmediadev/Health.html
http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/publications/africa_casestudies/tracnet.pdf
8. Summary: The TRACnet system, developed by the company Voxiva, is a web-based
application that is accessible both through computers and mobile phones. The system allow clinics to
send HIV/AIDS patient information from mobile phones with SMS text messaging to a central
database using a standard Motorola phone with a downloadable application. [2] Using TRACnet,
health care workers can track and follow up with HIV patients in remote areas with no electricity and
Interagency Working Group for mHealth
5/5/10
Page 5
little infrastructure. Clinics can also receive the results of laboratory tests and drug=recall alerts on
their mobile phones. They can also send health alerts and inventory counts of antiretroviral drugs, as
well as download treatment guidelines and training materials.[3] The system is designed to increase
accountability among health care workers through an electronic record that is created by every input
into the system. TRACnet also facilitates better communication from clinic to clinic as well as from
individual clinics to the Health Ministry in Kigali.[4]
The TRACnet system can be accessed through any PC with an internet connection. It features a
“dashboard” that shows data and government HIV indicators from the field, giving the viewer a
comprehensive view of the status, patient load, and drug supply levels of all of the HIV/AIDS
programs in Rwanda. The aggregated information from all of the clinics also allows healthcare and
government workers to identify trends in the data and to track the effectiveness of the program over
time. The dashboard also includes a geographic information system (GIS) mapping feature that shows
all of the clinics offering HIV/AIDS services, and identifies particular clinics experiencing shortages of
anti-retroviral drugs.[5] The system now connects 75% of Rwanda’s 340 clinics and covers over 32,000
people.[6] The health ministry in Rwanda plans to expand the TRACnet system to the monitoring of
measles, polio, meningitis, and malaria, and other diseases.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: CellPhone GuideView
3. Country/countries: Colombia
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link:
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/collaboration/focus/health/smartphone_clinical_guidelines.aspx
8. Summary: Iyengar’s system, called Cellphone GuideView,2 uses existing clinical guidelines created
by medical experts and breaks down complex diagnostic and treatment procedures into simple steps
using an authoring tool called GuideView Author. Text, pictures, audio, and video are embedded in the
individual steps to help with comprehension and ease of use. Each set of steps comprising a procedure is
known as a “guideview.” The guideviews are stored on a smartphone’s memory card, enabling CHWs to
walk through the steps as they treat patients.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: RapidResponse, a m-health platform
3. Country/countries: N/A
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://mobileactive.org/rapid-response-mhealth-platform-how-it-works
8. Summary: RapidResponse is a m-health platform built on RapidSMS developed for the Millennium
Villages Project with support from the UNICEF Innovation Group. RapidResponse uses SMS text
messages to facilitate and coordinate the activities of health care providers in the field. These are usually
lay community health care workers who tend to provide the majority of patient care in many developing
countries.
Using simple text messages, the community health workers are able to register patients and send in
health reports to a central web dashboard that allows a health team to closely monitor the health of a
community. Powerful messaging features help facilitate communication between the members of the
health system and an automated alert system helps reduce gaps in treatment.
RapidSMS is a platform created from the same underlying pieces of computer code. Each one was
crafted to solve a specific problem of a field office. The underlying code-base is open-source, so anyone
can use it and build upon the platform. RapidSMS is designed to be customized for the varied needs and
Interagency Working Group for mHealth
5/5/10
Page 6
constraints of UNICEF and the developing world. Each RapidSMS product is an SMS-based tool that
enables mobile data collection and messaging. Users can collect both quantitative and qualitative data
through customizable SMS forms. Quantitative data from the forms can be edited through a RapidSMS
web interface, exported to Excel, and displayed with a built-in graphing tool. Qualitative data can be
collected in open-ended questions known as 'general queries.' General queries can be used to poll a base
of users or community on a certain question or topic, and all responses are stored in an SMS inbox for
easy review. With the RapidSMS web interface, multiple users from around the world can
simultaneously access the system to view incoming data as it arrives, export new data-sets, and send
text messages to users. RapidSMS is free to download, use, and modify -- and runs well even on lowpowered and older computers, needing only a GSM modem and SIM card to get started. RapidSMS
leverages popular programming languages, and thus is easily integrated into existing ICT systems. A
RapidSMS implementation has optional audio capabilities so users can leave voice messages or browse
information through an IVR interface that can recite text or play audio clips over the phone. This
currently requires a computer with PBX hardware installed and a land line or voice-over-IP line;
however UNICEF Innovations is currently working to develop a solution that uses a standard cellphone
(connected to the computer) to receive phone calls and record messages into the system.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Mobile for Development (M4D)
3. Country/countries: Global
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://www.comminit.com/en/node/308751/307
8. Summary: Mobile for Development (M4D) is a not-for-profit technology initiative designed to
help development organisations leverage the ubiquity of mobile phones to increase the effectiveness of
their social change work. M4D is a project of ZMQ Software Systems, a Delhi, India-based company
specialising in using information and communication technology (ICT) to develop communication
solutions, with a focus on entertainment-centred, interactive learning to raise awareness about issues
such as HIV/AIDS. ZMQ's goal in establishing M4D is to guide communication for development (C4D)
organisations in effectively reaching the groups their work is designed for, thereby empowering them
with information and enabling them to access the world. M4D hopes that such a process will help
organisations contribute to the realisation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
The key sectors and their solutions are: Healthcare: education and awareness, communication
and training of health workers, remote data collection, remote monitoring and surveillance, patient
tracking, disease management and outburst monitoring, and diagnostic and treatment support.
Education and training: m-Learning, educational games and awareness, training the trainers (ToTs),
learning management, testing and exams, and infrastructure for mobile optimisation.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: CelloPhone
3. Country/countries: Africa, South America, South Asia
4. Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link: http://www.comminit.com/en/node/292632/307
8. Summary: CelloPhone works by interpreting the "shadows" of cells. CelloPhone loads samples of
blood, urine, or other bodily fluids into a modified mobile phone. The images are captured using a
special light source and the phone's camera, and then sent by multimedia message to a central station,
from where a computer programme returns a diagnosis as a text message. The system could also record
data for epidemiological studies. The device uses the phone's own electronics, so additional
components would cost only around US$5-10 for each device. The CelloPhone team will use their
Interagency Working Group for mHealth
5/5/10
Page 7
share of the prize money to begin field trials later in 2009, using the existing networks of the University
of California (UC), Los Angeles (in the United States) to test how accurately CelloPhone diagnoses
diseases like malaria, HIV, and tuberculosis (TB) at large hospitals in Africa, South America, and South
Asia.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Optimizing Training for Health Care Workers in Resource-limited
Settings with eMOCHA (electronic Mobile Open-Source Comprehensive Health Application)
3. Country/countries: Uganda
4. Type of device and format: Smart Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link:
https://custom.cvent.com/09426BFA5E3149C49AAAB08AC8B1A31F/files/718ec790bce34ff29a4fa24
89256f98d.pdf
8. Summary: eMOCHA is a free open-source application, developed by the Johns Hopkins Center for
Clinical Global Health Education. eMOCHA is designed to assist health programs in developing
countries improve provider communication and education, as well as patient care, by coordinating
wireless devices with local server-based clinical training and patient care support services. One
component runs on Android-supported wireless devices (e.g. smartphones). The smartphone works as a GPSlinked clinical data gathering application (using ODK), an interactive training device (e.g. supporting
videos, distance learning courses and other clinical support tools) and a medical consult tool (e.g. using
the voice calling capabilities and the camera on the phone to communicate with to a consultant doctor
on call). A messaging system embedded in the client provides encrypted two way messaging between
the medical staff and the community health workers.
1. Organization: N/A
2. Document name: Application of Smart Phone in "Better Border Health Care Program(BBHP)
3. Country/countries: Thailand
4. Type of device and format: Smart Phone
5. Type of document: case
6. Contact info: N/A
7. Link:
https://custom.cvent.com/09426BFA5E3149C49AAAB08AC8B1A31F/files/26ac0316445947d5baf1d0
ca11bd623e.pdf
8. Summary: MCCM is an added-on function to the existing MOPH Health Care Information
System (HCIS). The system generates listing of ANC/EPI visit due dates. This system allows HC
personnel in cross-checking and identifying ANC/EPI status either at HC or household location when
performing home visit. This mobile technology-based system makes it more efficient in monitoring
ANC/EPI coverage. Even though there is no mobile signal network coverage in the study areas, the
system proofs that follow-up data (such as pictures, Geo-tagging data, clinical symptoms, etc.) can be
captured through mobile phone, and later synchronize to the data center. Well integrated system should
not increase workload to the local health center staff but should apply to the existing tool, or a daily
use equipment to enhance the way of capturing valuable data.
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Organization: United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
Document name: AIDSinfos
Country/countries: US
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4.
Type of device and format: Pocket PC 2002 and later
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://aidsinfo.nih.gov/PDATools/PDAToxicities.aspx
8.
Summary: This PDA tool provides users “on-the-go” access to important antiretroviral therapy
associated with adverse events (drug toxicities) including information on the clinical manifestations, risk
factors, and monitoring and management of adverse events. The tool is based on tables from the United
States “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents.”
1. Organization: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
2.
Document name: AIDSInfo’s HIV/AIDS Glossary
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Palm PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://aidsinfo.nih.gov/PDATools/PDAGlossary.aspx
8.
Summary: The HIV/AIDS Glossary for Palm PDAs provides easy access for HIV/AIDS related
terms. Users have the option of searching for a term or listing all the terms in each alphabetical
category.
1. Organization: BioMed Central
2.
Document name: N/A
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Computer plus Palm compatible PDAs, PocketPCs and Window CE
devices
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://www.biomedcentral.com/info/about/whatis
8. Summary: BioMed Central is an independent publishing house committed to providing
immediate open access to peer-reviewed biomedical research. All original research articles published by
BioMed Central are made freely and permanently accessible online immediately upon publication.
BioMed Central views open access to research as essential in order to ensure the rapid and efficient
communication of research findings. Users of Palm compatible PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants),
PocketPCs and Windows CE devices can receive up-to-the-minute research article abstracts from
BioMed Central. AvantGo's free software, which must be installed on a computer, will automatically
download research abstracts from BioMed Central when you synchronize your PDA. These articles can
be read at any convenient time. Articles are available from three categories: BioMed Central, Biology
Research and/or Medical Research.
1. Organization: Iterum, LLC
2.
Document name: eMedic
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Windows for Pocket PC, Palm OS.
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://emedic.com/contacts.htm
8.
Summary: Software, designed for Palm and Pocket PCs but now available for desktop and laptop
computers, that provides an emergency medical reference library. It contains various modules, medical
calculators, sample ECGs (electrocardiogram) strips, anatomical illustrations, reference cards on more
than 100 traumas and medical emergencies. Also, eMedic provides a list of most prescribed medicines,
emergency medications and a list of popular medical acronyms
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1. Organization: McGraw-Hill's AccessMedicine.com
2.
Document name: Harrison’s on-Hand
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Windows (no information about the version), Palm OS, Pocket PC
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://www.accessmedicine.com/
8. Summary: Harrison’s on-Hand is an information tool on medical diagnosis and treatment for
handhelds. By using browsing and navigation features, local and online search capabilities, a user can
find, capture, and store information needed to answer questions and solve problems. It consists of four
resource tools: Harrison's Manual of Medicine, Harrison's Online updates, Harrison's Online access to
an annual individual subscription and a Personal Web Library which allows users to customize their
handheld subscriptions and manage their library requests.
1. Organization: pdaVerticals Network
2.
Document name: Healthy Palm Pilot
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://www.pdaverticals.com/
8.
Summary: Healthy Palm Pilot is a comprehensive website that provides information on
mtechnology devices and available software for individual devices in a variety of fields including
health and education. These products are produced by pdaVerticals Network. Other products include:
pdaMD - a resource for medical professionals URL – www.pdaMD.com pdaED - a resource for
students and education professionals URL – www.pdaED.com
1. Organization: MEDLINE (National Library of Medical Science)
2.
Document name: MD on Tap
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: MD on Tap is designed for PPCs with a screen resolution of 240W
x 320H. Although it will run on the Windows Mobile square-screen Smartphones, such as the Treo
700, the user will not see the bottom portion of the tabs.
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: www.medlineplus.gov
8.
Summary: MD on Tap is an application for PDAs that retrieves MEDLINE citations directly
through a wireless connection to the Internet. There are versions of the MD on Tap Client for PDAs
and PDA/Cellphones with both Pocket PC and with Palm Operating Systems. The PDA or
PDA/Cellphone must have a wireless connection to the Internet.
1. Organization: BEIKS, MedicineNet,Pharma-Lexicon
2.
Document name: Medical Dictionaries for Palm
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://www.beiks.com/Windows Mobile/showprod.asp?ProdID=141
8.
Summary: Various medical reference dictionaries are available for the BEIKS Dictionary Reader
platform. They come from different content providers and address different topics from the medical
reference field.
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The Medical Abbreviations Dictionary developed by Pharma-lexicon is an example of the products
available. This Dictionary is one of the world's largest databases of medical, pharma, biotech, agrochem,
and healthcare abbreviations and their meanings. It was created for Windows smartphones with
contributions from hundreds of people and organizations from around the world.The Pharma-Lexicon’s
Medical Abbreviations Dictionary for Windows Mobile smartphones contains over 46,000 unique
medical abbreviations and 6,000 medical abbreviations. It is expandable with other BEIKS dictionaries
and phrasebooks for Windows smartphones. Based on the mobile industry standard BEIKS Dictionary
Reader, this product is specially suited for one-hand operation. It has minimal memory requirements
and optimal access speed. It can be installed on either main memory or on an extension
media card and, once installed, does not require or utilize network connection. This dictionary is also
available with the Pro version of BDicty Dictionary Reader. Other available dictionaries:
Medical Dictionary /BEIKS/ - Offers over 38,000 medical terms with compact yet informative
definitions and references. The dictionary was assembled by medical students under the leadership of
retired medical professors. The package includes the Pro version of BDicty Dictionary Reader, allowing
individuals to extend the lexicon with their own entries.
Pocket Guide to Common Medications /MedicineNet/ - This dictionary is from the editors of
Webster’s Medical Dictionary and is a drug guide to the most popular US medications. It contains 400+
monograms and 1,000 generic/brand names. This dictionary is also available with the BDicty
Dictionary Pro.
Pocket Medical Encyclopedia /MediceNet - Doctors at MedicineNet.com have written the
encyclopedia for lay persons. It contains more than 15,500 entries that are not only the usual medical
terms, but also pertinent scientific items, abbreviations, acronyms, jargon, institutions, projects,
symptoms, syndromes, eponyms, and medical history. It is written entirely by U.S. board certified
physicians to be used by anyone concerned about health.
First Aid Spanish Dictionary Phrasebook for ER and First Aid Workers – This product provides
essential English to Spanish medical vocabulary and key phrases that field healthcare workers need to
communicate with Spanish-speaking patients.
Epidemiology Glossary - This free glossary contains about 200 specialized terms from epidemiology
contributed by Mr. Stephane Richard and Mrs. Erin Coullahan.
1. Organization: Health Science Library, University of Virginia
2.
Document name: PDA Health Resource System
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PalmPCs, PDAs
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/library/home.cfm
8.
Summary: The University of Virginia’s Health Science Library provides resources and support for
students wishing to use their PDAs as a medical information tool. All third year medical students at the
university are required to have a PDA. The library’s website includes a comprehensive list of health and
medical PDA software and portals as well as basic security and support resources. Library instructors
are available by appointment to provide consultations on using PDAs as a medical information tool.
1. Organization: PDA Medical and Health Software
2.
Document name: PDA Medical & Health Software for BlackBerry
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://pdamedisoft.com
8. Summary: PDAMEDISOFT offers a broad range of medical software for BlackBerry, PalmOS,
Pocket PC and Smartphones. These are a sample of what is available for BlackBerry:
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Medical dictionary for BlackBerry 4.0 - This is a medical dictionary containing over 38,000 easy-tounderstand explanations of medical terms.
URL: http://pdmedisoft.com/BlackBerry/medical-dictionary-for-BlackBerry
Pocket Medical Encyclopedia for BlackBerry handhelds 4.0 - This product is an add-on for Medical
dictionary. Based upon the MedicineNet Pocket Medical Encyclopedia, the information includes
standard medical terms, pertinent scientific items, abbreviations, jargon, institutions, projects,
symptoms, syndromes, eponyms, and medical history. URL:http://pdamedisoft.com/Pocket-MedicalEncyclopedia-for-Blackberryhandheld
MedicineNet’s Pocket Guide to Medications for BlackBerry 4.0 - The Pocket Guide gives quick
and convenient access to important information on common medications to mobile users. It is a doctorproduced informational database of 400+ monographs covering over 1,000 generic and brand names of
the most popular U.S. medications. URL:http://pdamedisoft.com/BlackBerry/MedicineNet’s-PocketGuide-toMedications-for-BlackBerry Other software products for the BlackBerry mobile device include Tarascon
Pocket Pharmacopoeia Deluxe 1.0, and Ascendo Fitness for BlackBerry 3.41.
1. Organization: Skyscape, Inc.
2.
Document name: Skyscape Products – Lippincott’s Nursing Drug Guide for PDA
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.skyscape.com
7.
Link: http://www.skyscrape.com/estore/Productdetail.aspx?productid=2200
8.
Summary: Skyscape offers a large portfolio of resources and tools for the medical profession. The
company has products for eight professional categories. For physicians, Skyscape supports 34
specialties. There are forty-five titles available in cardiology alone and sixty eight titles in nursing.
Lippincott’s Nursing Drug Guide for PDA is one of the products. It has been updated in 2008 with over
800 complete drug monographs and full-color photos of pills and capsules which focus on the needs of
practicing nurses. The 2008 edition of the Nursing Drug Guide includes key patient teaching points,
interaction with drugs, food, alternative therapies, and laboratory tests. It has been updated with dozens
of newly approved drugs and indications.
1. Organization: USBMIS
2.
Document name: USBMIS Mobile Health Products - SkinDX Software
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.usbmis.com
7.
Link: http://www.usbmis.com/skindx/
8.
Summary: US Biomedical Information Systems, Inc. (USBMIS) is a software solutions company
that specializes in developing interactive, mobile applications for the healthcare industry. The company
develops their software products in partnership with publishers and authors who are experts in their
fields. SkinDx PDA software is one of USBMIS‘s software products. As the newest addition to their
mobile reference library, USBMIS offers this comprehensive guide to essential information for the
detection, treatment, and management of common dermatological conditions. Its value stems from an
intelligent database system, which allows users to query a comprehensive list of dermatological
conditions by morphology, shape, symptoms, distribution, color, arrangement, and systemic symptoms.
SkinDx is compatible with Palm, Pocket PC, and BlackBerry devices.
Other USBMIS products include:
RNotes: Nurse’s Clinical Pocket Guide
MedSurg Notes
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IV Med Notes
Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary
Obstetrics, Gynecology & Infertility
ECG Notes
Derm Notes
Treatment Guidelines from The Medical Letter
Scutmonkey / JTF Emergency Medicine plus 10 other products
1. Organization: Islandcoders, Inc.
2.
Document name: Endocrine Doctor
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Palm OS 3.5 and higher. It also runs on Pocket PC 2002/Windows
CE 3.x, Pocket PC 2003 and Windows Mobile. The Student Grade Manager will not work on Windows
Mobile 5.0 smart Phones.
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.islandcoders.com
7.
Link: http://islandcoders.com/emd.html
8.
Summary: Endocrine Doctor is a complete guide to the management and diagnosis of the nine
most common diseases of the endocrine system. It is compatible with various mobile platforms. This
product is also equipped with a diagnostic tool, a description tool, and a comprehensive glossary.
Information concerning endocrine systems diseases is now within a tap of the stylus. The Diagnostic
tool of Endocrine Doctor employs the two-tap system of narrowing down disease diagnosis. Through
the analysis of eighty two symptoms, the nine endocrine diseases can easily be identified and specified.
Differential diagnosis has never been easier. The Description tool of Endocrine Doctor covers virtually
all aspects of disease management. The Description (DS) tab gives a comprehensive definition of the
disease. The Orders (OR) tab lists all the usual orders that physicians give to nurses if the patient is to
be admitted. The Diagnostics (DX) tab lists all the tests to be done with regards to the identified
disease. The Therapeutics (TX) tab contains the disease treatment and management. The Glossary tool
contains an impressive list of the medical terms for this application. Powered by a fast search algorithm
to ease word search, this tool serves as a source of information or as a refresher guide to endocrine
disease discussions. Endocrine Doctor is a useful tool for the physician, the medical student and for the
general public.
1. Organization: US Biomedical Information Systems, Inc.
2.
Document name: Pediatrics On Call
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Windows CE 3.0/Windows Mobile or greater with up to
26.5MBof available memory. Windows 98/NT/2000XP with 128MB Pam and 14MB for/Palm91MB
for PPC on hard drive Palm Desktop 4.1.4 or greater ( if using Palm) Microsoft ActiveSync 3.5 or
greater (if using PocketPC) Only devices with touch screens are supported.
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.usbis.com
7.
Link: http://www.usbmis.com/pdaproducts.htm
8.
Summary: Pediatrics On Call provides mobile, on-the-spot treatment advice for the most
commonly encountered problems in pediatrics. The unique, well-organized format for the Palm or
PocketPC allows for quick access to the essential information needed to manage patients effectively. It is
ideal for use on the wards. Pediatrics On Call offers pediatricians and medical students a convenient and
comprehensive reference tool.
1.
2.
3.
Organization: Medical Wizards
Document name: PharmD ToolBox
Country/countries: US
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5/5/10
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4.
Type of device and format: The software operates on Palm OS, Pocket PC and on almost any
PDA.
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.medicalwizards.com
7.
Link: http://www.medicalwizards.com/client/productdesc.aspx?productid=53
8.
Summary: PharmD ToolBox 6.0 was designed to provide content and calculation tools needed by
experienced doctors at the point of care. This product is one of many produced by Medical Wizards for
health professionals. ToolBoxes are also available for nurses, paramedics, anesthesiologists, physician
assistants, and family physicians among others. The Pharm ToolBox enables the user to perform instant
weight-based calculations for drug dosages, antibiotics, critical care drips, emergency drugs, fluids, RSI,
toxicology, and more for both pediatric and adult patients. This program also adds relevant information
such as mixing, infusing and compatibility guides. More specifically, this product provides 17 modules
including a miniature antibiotic guide with integrated drug dosing calculations for children and adults,
advanced cardiac life support protocols, and adult critical care infusion calculator and reference. Other
modules include a comprehensive toxicology guide divided into information on ingestions, overdoses,
toxidromes and the specific antidotes with integrated dose calculator, a sedation module that calculates
doses of agents used for procedural (conscious) sedation for adults and children, and a critical care
infusion calculator and reference guide.
1. Organization: Giunti Labs
2.
Document name: eXact Mobile
3.
Country/countries: Italy
4.
Type of device and format: Mobile Phone
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.learnexact.com
7.
Link: http://www.learnexact.com/info.php?vvu=34
8.
Summary: eXact Mobile is purported to be the first commercial Mobile Learning Content
Management Solution. It is a new module of learn eXact that provides context-aware learning content
delivery when the learner needs to access it. eXact Mobile is offered as the perfect learning solution for
all an organization’s mobile workers and learners.
It is ideal for:
Sales force education
Industrial training and maintenance support
Continuous medical and pharmaceutical education
Cultural heritage edutainment
Blended academic learning programs
eXact Mobile can be integrated to learn eXact LCMS suite or interfaced with any 3rd party eLearning
(LMS/VLE) solution. eXact Mobile provides access to the LMS through mobile UMTS Wi-Fi and
GPRS devices, providing a high level of flexibility in learning program planning. eXact Mobile also
feeds tracking information back to the LMS allowing the learner or mobile worker to follow learning
programs always using the most convenient device available.
1. Organization: Gasshead
2.
Document name: Anesthesia Clinical Tutor and Calculator (ACTc), Version 3.0
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Macintosh (Mac OS), Windows XP, Windows 2000, Palm OS, or
Pocket PC 2002
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http:///www.gasshead.com/
8.
Summary: This product is designed to teach and simplify everyday calculations involved in
anesthesia practice. It aims to bridge the gap between clinical anesthesia reference books (converted to a
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Page 14
PDA format) and practical educational software. ACTc, Version 3.0 is designed for both Windows
Mobile 5.0 and Palm OS 5.4. The educational and foundational data behind ACTc is reviewed by a team
of anesthesiologists and anesthetists and then field tested by a group of volunteer anesthesia clinicians
worldwide for applicability and functionality.
Version 3.0 incorporates many features:
Patient Data Screen – core information to guide airway needs, fluids, medications and
transfusions.
Snap Shot Screen – set up individual specific cases with drug and fluid information from the
most used reference data: Standard GA, ICU/RSI, MAC, Vascular, and
Neuro case profiles already set up.
LABS Screen – extensive lab section with the most commonly referenced lab values.
Permits users to change institutional values or add other lab items.
MH (Malignant Hyperthermia) Screen – provides immediate dosing guidelines.
Drug Screen – both adult and pediatric databases to include induction drugs, sedatives,
antiemetics, paralytics, reversals, ACLS, PALS, and analgesics.
Vital Statistics Page (pediatrics) – age appropriate statistics.
Interactive Tutor and Help Screens – each screen has help sections that enhance the teaching
process and explain how each calculation is derived.
Other features – Interactive Electro-neutrality calculator, Regional Screens, Updated Blood
Screens and Resuscitation Screens, Settings, Fluids, Drips Screens, Inhalation Screens, Airway
Screens, and Calculation Database Reference/Readings Screens.
1. Organization: Pedid LLC
2.
Document name: Clinical Rotation Companion (CRC)
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.pepid.com/contact
7.
Link: http://pepid.com/products/crc/default.asp?product=CRC
8.
Summary: CRC is a software product designed to deliver authoritative information to medical
students on their clinical rotation. Rotation specific topics include step-by-step instructions for taking
patient histories, conducting a physical examination, issuing admit and discharge orders and crosscoverage. It was developed in partnership with the Family Physicians Inquiries Network (FPIN) and
other leading academic and clinical physicians. CRC is the only handheld reference guide with embedded
evidence-based FPIN Clinical Inquiries and help desk answers.
1. Organization: N/A
2.
Document name: University of North Carolina Medical School PDAs
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: PalmPCs, PDAs
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: http://www.med.unc.edu/pda/
7.
Link: http://www.med.unc.edu/pda/
8.
Summary: The Medical School of the UNC requires students to have a PDA for their clinical
assignments. The PDA is used as valuable reference tool, a clinical calculator, and to report and retain
clinical information. The most basic model PDA can fulfill thisrequirement. The School does not require
a specific brand or model, but the PDAmust be a Palm OS version 5.0 or Pocket PC. If necessary, funds
are put into a student’s second year, second semester financial aid package for this purchase.
1.
2.
3.
Organization: Key2Know
Document name: N/A
Country/countries: Denmark
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5/5/10
Page 15
4.
Type of device and format: PDA
5.
Type of document: case
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://www.m-learning.dk/default.aspx?page=health&lang=en
8.
Summary: Develops m-learning programs for these health care segments:
Home health care

M-learning programs for home health care

Implementation of the care system:

Teaching how to use the PDA – on a PDA.

Teaching use of the care system on the PDA.

M-learning for health care employees:

Wound care

Administration of medicine

Instructional video and 3D animations of:

The ergonomics of lifting citizens correctly.

How to put on and remove compression stockings.

Correct use of assistive technology for citizens.

3D animation descriptions of illnesses.
Hospitals

M-learning programs for hospital doctors and nurses.

Implementation of Electronic Medical Records modules:

Teaching how to use the PDA – on a PDA.

Teaching use of the Electronic Medical Records modules on a PDA.

M-learning colleague-to-colleague training:

Insertion of drop or catheter, administration of insulin, etc.
Health care centres

Informing citizens:

Regional health care centre portal with descriptions of illnesses such as COL, diabetes,
pneumonia, etc.
1. Organization: eLearning Guild
2.
Document name: mLearnCon
3.
Country/countries: US
4.
Type of device and format: Mobile Phone, PDA, Smart Phones
5.
Type of document: Conference; June 15-17, 2010; San Diego, CA
6.
Contact info: N/A
7.
Link: http://www.elearningguild.com/mLearnCon/concurrent-sessions/sessiondetails.cfm?event=62
8.
Summary:
Listing of Conference Sessions:
Block 1:
 mLearning Today: An Introduction Overview
 “Googlefy” Your Life: Mobile Information in the Cloud
 Innovation in mLearning: An International Perspective
 Using Mobile Technology as Part of an Integrated Learning Strategy
 Design Approaches for Adapting Content for mLearning
 So you want to build an App?
 Just Too Late Learning—Instructional Design for the Mobile World
Block 2:
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 Context, Content, and Collaboration: Keys to Successful mLearning
 Getting the Most from a Small Screen: Design Strategies for Mobile Devices
 Building a Mobile Vision: From Content to Collaboration
 Bridging the Learning Divide: Making mLearning Accessible for All
 Creating mLearning Applications with Adobe Flash Lite
 MLearning Goes Mainstream: The State of the mLearning Industry
 Featured Panel: The Management View of mLearning
 Psychology of Absence: The Reality of Less in mLearning
Block 3:
 MLearning Meets Social Networking
 Using PowerPoint to Create mLearning
 Maximizing Interactivity in mLearning
 Mobile Audio Recording: Let Me Count the Ways
 Smarter New Hires: How IBM Improves Learner Engagement Via SMS
 Chicago PD Equips Officers with Personalized Mobile Performance Support
 Designing and Building Micro Widgets for O.D. Consulting and Sales Tracking
 20 mLearning Tools in 60 Minutes
Block 4:
 The First 10 Questions Your Company Needs to Ask Before You Adopt mLearning
 Future Panel: iPad – Game Changer or Just Another Tablet?
 Mobile Application Toolkits
 Easily Creating Cross-device Online and Offline Content without Programming
 If at First You Don’t Succeed ... The mLearning Journey at Qualcomm
 Sharing Learning Content on an iTouch … Anywhere, Anytime
 Video Content á-la-Mode
Block 5:
 Thinking Deeper about Learning: Theories for Mobile and More
 MLearning on Multiple Devices: A Practical Guide
 MSupport: The Other mLearning!
 Optimum Design and Deployment Approaches for mLearning Content
 Digital Wine: Sales and Consumer Education Via Mobile
 Creating and Deploying Secured Rich-media Content for mLearning
 Featured Panel: MLearning in Government
Block 6:
 MLearning Myths & Misconceptions
 Do-it-yourself mLearning Applications for the iPhone
 MLearning Theory Mashups
 MLearning Innovation: Healthcare Leads the Way
 Guild Research to Help You with Your First mLearning Initiatives
 Portable Cloud Computing: A Case Study and a Report
 Development Techniques for User Interface Text and Web-based Content in Smartphone
Applications
Block 7:
 Making Sense of the Vendor Landscape for mLearning
 What's the Difference? A Closer Look at WebOS, iPhoneOS, and Android
 Preotyping: Design, Iterate, and Test Apps Before You Write a Line of Code
 Videocast to Dynamize Communities
 Teaching from the Cloud — A Community-developed mLearning Platform
 MLearning in a Global Organization
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 Using Mobile Devices to Enhance In-class Training
 Building Mobile Apps on Clouds
Block 8:
 Academic Research on mLearning: What Are We Finding? What Are We Missing?
 Mobile Moodle
 Leveraging Consumer Market Mobile Apps within Your Organization
 Personal Inquiry: Science Investigations with Mobile Technology
 Lessons from Asia: New Mobile Models for the New Mobile Learner and Teacher
 Evaluating the Viability of mLearning to Enhance Management Training
 Mobile Training Reality – Employees Empowered by Learning Solution Delivery
 Optimizing the “Googleability” of Your Content
Block 9:
 Surviving without Flash: Some Practical Alternatives
 Training Handouts on Mobile Devices — Hands-on ePub Conversions
 Social Connectedness through Mobile Texting
 Microsoft Case Study: Using Mobile and Media to Connect Communities
 Advancing Applications for Mobile Technologies in the Healthcare Field\
 Using Mobile Devices to Capture Tribal Knowledge
 Featured Panel: MLearning in Education
Block 10:
 Building mLearning with Your Existing Toolkit
 Performance Support is More Than You Think It Is: Mobility in Service to Wine and Roses
 Making a Podcast a Learning Experience — Not Just a Listening Experience
 (Not) Lost In Translation: Using XSLT to Deliver Mobile Content
 SCORM Implementation Strategies for mLearning
 You Need Lifestyle Media: How Content and Delivery Are Relevant to You
 Multi-media Learning for Mobile
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