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Drill #11 September 14, 2009
Rewrite these sentencees in the literary present
tense.
Barack Obama told many stories of people
he met who explained problems they had.
Although they came from both ends of the
political spectrum, they generally shared
the same concerns.
Barack Obama tells many stories of people he meets who
explain problems they have. Although they come from
both ends of the political spectrum, they generally share
the same concerns.
Objectives
• Students will record notes on a
presentation demonstrating how to
avoid common grammatical and spelling
errors.
• Students will exchange essays and
conduct peer editing using their notes
to identify targeted mechanical errors.
Essay Analysis: “The Scenic
Route”
Re-read and “mark up” Kristie Ferguson’s
“The Scenic Route” following the
guidelines and example on pp. 7-11.
Summer Reading Assignment
You should have used your dialectical journal
notes as pre-writing for your first major writing
assignment.
A word-processed revision of this assignment
should have been finished before Today. An
edited final will be collected Friday.
Your final draft should be two to five pages,
typed, double-spaced, Times New Roman 12
point font.
Today we will conduct peer editing.
The Literary Present
(present tense)
When writing about literature,
we act as if events in the text
are happening right now.
Rainsford fell from the
ship, but managed
falls to swim
manages
to the nearby
island.
But first, we have some technical
issues to discuss regarding your
writing.
Please open your notebooks to the “Class
Notes” section.
Remember, when you take notes, you don’t
have time to write everything down.
too many
“o”s.
To,
Too, Two
• Haven’t
I told
also
alsoyou how to use “to, too, and
two” right?
• Haven’t I told you, too?
• I have had to tell you two how to use “to,
too, and two” correctly too many times.
two
to
toward
(like back ward and
forward)
twin, Twix,
twelve,
twenty
Dont
Don’tforget!
Don’t be so negative!
any
I can’t get no satisfaction.
any
I don’t want no scrub.
anything
doesn’t
He don’t
know nothing.
Be proper!
Capitalize proper nouns
(person, place, and other “one
of a kind” names like “Ship
Trap Island,” and “Baltimore.”
Capitalize the first words
of sentences.
Capitalize letters in
acronyms, like DMX and TLC.
There is a place.
Where are you?
Where?
Where?
Here.
Oh! You’re
there!
Here!
I’m right here!
I’m out of here.
Contractions
• Get your apostrophes
straight!
•It’s cute!
–Possessive: Doug’s car
•I’ll take it!
–Mr. Gauld’s ride
–Bob Jones’s
hoopty
•don’t forget the apostrophe
–The girls’ bathroom
They
They’re
are
cute!
They’re
grammatical!
Their Farm
ei ei,
! yo!
a lot
man
men
womb
woma
n
wome
Formatting Titles
• Poem: “Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer’s Day?”
• Short Story or Article: “On Their Own”
• Book: A Lesson Before Dying
• Periodical The Sun
• Play: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Subject Verb Agreement:
Present Tense
• Plural present nouns usually end in an “s”.
cows
• Singular present verbs usually end in an “s”.
drives
The “s” is on either the noun or the verb, but
not both.
• Cows drive.
• The cow drives.
Characters’ Names
Ceaser-Caesar
Spell characters’ names
correctly. They’re right in
front of you, so this requires
minimum effort. From now
on, misspelling characters’
names and titles of works
we are reading will cost you.
Your, You’re, Yore
• You’re having problems with your
homonyms again. Here’s another one to
watch.
• Your: possessive
• You’re: You are
• Yore: times long past, “the day”
Cause, Because
• What caused his bad grade?
• He failed because the teacher didn’t
like him.
• Was that the real cause?
• Yes, that’s what caused it.
• Why didn’t the teacher like him?
• I think it was because he didn’t do
any work in her class.
Fill, Feel,
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fell
Did you get your fill?
Yes, I’m filled.
How do you feel?
I feel full.
Be careful, or you might fall.
Ouch! I fell.
How does that feel?
It feels @%$&*# fabulous, fool!
gonna
Gonna-a colloquialism derived from the
Standard English expression “going to,”
used to indicate the future using present
tense verbs.
• I am gonna keep using “gonna.”
• I’m going to take five points from anyone
who does.
wanna
Mary: Hi, Juana! Wanna go to the
club?
Juana: It’s not wanna.
Mary: Oh. Sorry. To whom am I
speaking?
Juana: It’s me—Juana! I’d love to go
out.
Mary: Why do you wanna say it’s not
you if it’s you, Juana?
Juana: It’s not wanna! It’s want to.
Mary: Okay. You can bring Juan, too.
Juana: (Sigh) I don’t think I want to go
after all.
Quotations
When quoting from a text, copy
precisely what appears in the text.
Every capitalization, every space, every
word the same.
According to Mr. Gauld, quotes should be
exact, and “Every capitalization, every
space, every word” should be “the same.”
Double Agents:
Past tense verbs.
• If my wife supposes I should
go to the store with her, then I
am supposed
_________ to go.
• If my wife uses me to carry
groceries all of the time, I’ll
used
eventually get _______
to it.
Iven want
me! He don’t
want your
skanky butt!
No. Iven
wants me! He
doesn’t want
your
ungrammatical
butt. And that’s
five points off your
grade, too!
Disagreement!
pass, passed, past
He passed past me in the hall without a pass. “I’m
sorry,” I said, “I cannot let you past me.” He passed
two years ago, hit by a car as he crossed the street
after leaving school early without a pass.
tough, though, through, throat,
thought, throughout, thorough, threw
The announcer, his throat dry from
screaming throughout his thorough
coverage of the game, poured a drink from
the pitcher. He didn’t get a chance to
drink it, though, as just then, the pitcher
threw. He thought the batter would miss,
but he smacked it right through the leftfield bleachers. Tough luck for the home
team.
Many of you are doing this:
It was a death in the village.
There
It is a sink in the bathroom.
There
There
It is a reason for that.
What is
that thing
in the
bathroom?
It’s a
sink,
fool!
The Mystery of the Missing Preposition
Freddy told Shaggy to get out the van.