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Screening Results Enclosed
Page 1 of 16
Report Date: July 26, 2013
Jane Q. Sample
490 White Pond Dr.
Akron, OH 44320-2342
Dear Ms. Sample,
Thank you for your recent participation at the health screening held at Deer Park Baptist Church, community
partner with St. Mary’s Health. Congratulations on taking an important proactive step in maintaining your
future good health!
Your Results
Your screening results are enclosed. They have been reviewed by a board-certified physician. The following
page provides a summary view of all your results. We’ve provided you an additional copy of this page that we
encourage you to share with your doctor even if your results are normal. The rest of the report contains more
detailed information about each screening test. We suggest you keep your results with your other personal
health records.
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Next Steps
At Life Line Screening, we believe in prevention. We are here to help you lead a fuller and healthier life. With
that in mind, here are 3 important steps you can take to maintain your good health:
•
Share With Your Doctor: Preventive screenings can indicate the presence of a possible problem, but
remember that the results of these screenings must be interpreted in the context of your clinical history.
Your personal doctor can help with that interpretation. Screening tests can alert you to diseases long before
symptoms occur. This is important for early diagnosis and treatment by your doctor.
•
Stay Up-To-Date: Enroll in our FREE Power of Prevention E-Newsletter by signing up online at
www.LifeLineScreening.com/welcome. Every month, you’ll receive important health news , valuable
information on new health products and services, and discounts for you or your family & friends.
•
Schedule Regular Follow-Ups: Screenings should be part of your ongoing health regimen. We will
keep track of your past screening history, and notify you when it’s time to be re-screened. For most
people, screenings every 12 – 24 months are medically appropriate. Mark your calendar, and plan to
make health screening a regular event!
Again, congratulations on taking this important step in managing your preventive health routine. At Life Line
Screening, we are here to help you every step of the way.
Sincerely,
Andrew J. Manganaro,
M.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.C.C.
Chief Medical Officer
Dr. William Zinn, M.D.
Vascular Reviewing Physician
Life Line Screening • Park Center Plaza II Suite 200 • 6150 Oak Tree Blvd. • Independence, OH 44131
www.LifeLineScreening.com • 1-800-897-9177
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Sample, Jane
!20130725:SA130712.051:0004;
Page 2 of 16
Screening Results
Screening Date: July 11, 2013
Location: Deer Park Baptist Church
Fasting: Y
D.O.B.: 07/22/1942
Participant Copy
Jane Q. Sample
Doctor Consultation Recommended:
Screening
Carotid
Artery
Disease
YES
Your Results
Compared to Generally Accepted Risk Categories
Normal
Normal
Atrial
Fibrillation
Normal
Abdominal
Aortic
Aneurysm
Normal
Peripheral
Arterial
Disease
P
Normal
0.9 - 1.3
Mild
Mild
Moderate
Moderate
Abnormal
< 0.9
Significant
Significant
Measurement
Abnormal
4-limb
EKG
July 2014
Abnormal
<3cm
Abdominal
Aorta Size
July 2016
Ankle
Brachial
Index
July 2014
Venous Refill
Time (seconds)
NOW
Bone Mineral
Density (BMD)
July 2015
Unable
to Evaluate
Left Side:
0.82
Abnormal
< 0.9
Unable
to Evaluate
Normal
> 21 seconds
Abnormal
< 17 seconds
Inconclusive
18-20 seconds
Left Side:
Not Taken
Low Risk
> -1.2
Moderate Risk
-1.3 to -2.5
July 2014
PSV: < 110cm/s
Normal
0.9 - 1.3
Abnormal
< 17 seconds
Recommended
Next Screening
Left:
PSV: < 110cm/s Plaque Buildup
and
Blood Flow
Right:
Right Side:
1.08
Normal
> 21 seconds
Clinical
Measures
No Atrial
Fibrillation
Heart Rate: 083
Beats/min
Chronic Venous
Insufficiency
Osteoporosis
NO
Inconclusive
18-20 seconds
High Risk
< -2.6
Right Side:
Not Taken
-1.7
Carotid Artery Illustrations for each Results Category
You Are Here
Normal
No plaque present.
Blood flow normal.
(Blood velocity <110 cm/s)
Mild
Small amount of plaque,
blood flow still normal.
(Blood velocity <110 cm/s)
Moderate
Moderate amount of
plaque, blood flow
reduced.
(Blood velocity 110-139
cm/s)
Significant
Large amount of plaque,
Blood flow is
significantly reduced.
(Blood velocity >140 cm/s)
When detected early and with appropriate modification of stroke risk factors, 80% of strokes can be prevented.
Normal
Key
Mild
Moderate
Borderline
Findings of Possible Significance
Page 3 of 16
Screening
Complete
Lipid
Panel
Your Results
Compared to Generally Accepted Risk Categories
Measurement
Desirable
<200 mg/dL
Borderline
200-239
High Risk
>240
116
Protected Against
Heart Disease
>60 mg/dL
Desirable
40-59
Risk for
Heart Disease
<40 mg/dL
42
Near/Above
Optimal
100-129
Optimal
<100 mg/dL
Borderline
130-159
Borderline
High
150-199
Normal
<150 mg/dL
High
160-189
High
200-499
Very High
>190 mg/dL
Very High
>500 mg/dL
54
99
Glucose
Normal
<100 mg/dL
Pre-diabetes
100-125
Diabetes
>126 mg/dL
91
Heart Risk
Assessment
Low Risk
<1%
Moderate Risk
1-29%
High Risk
>30%
3
Body Mass
Index
Blood Pressure
�����������
Waist
Underweight
<18.5
Normal
Normal
18.5-24.9
Prehypertension
Moderate Risk
25-29.9
High
Stage 1
Normal
M <40 / F <35
High Risk
>30
High
Stage 2
High
M >40 / F >35
34
Clinical
Recommended
Next Screening
Measures
Total
Cholesterol
mg/dL
HDL
Cholesterol
mg/dL
July 2014
LDL
Cholesterol
mg/dL
Triglycerides
mg/dL
GLU mg/dL
10-yr Heart
Risk %
lbs/in2
Height: 4'10"
Weight: 167 lbs
Normal
Mild
Moderate
Borderline
July 2014
July 2014
103/64
mmHg
July 2014
42
Inches
July 2014
Certain blood tests were processed at Home Healthcare Laboratory of America (a LabCorp Company)
320 Premier Court, Suite 220, Franklin, Tennessee 37067
Key
July 2014
Findings of Possible Significance
Page 4 of 16
6 for Life Health Assessment
A healthier future starts NOW! Congratulations on taking our new 6 for Life Health Assessment.
This comprehensive screening measures key risk factors like cholesterol levels and blood
pressure, but takes them one step further to determine your future risk for 6 major, chronic
conditions that are largely preventable. Unlike a traditional health risk appraisal that simply
determines your risk factor category, 6 for Life is a disease risk assessment that demonstrates how
your risk factors impact your chance of developing specific disease conditions.
Your risk scores were calculated using a proprietary Life Line Screening scientific algorithm that
is based on the most current scientific studies, as well as the landmark Framingham Heart Study.
Your medical history plus clinical screening results for cholesterol, glucose (blood sugar), blood
pressure, Body Mass Index and waist measurement were used to calculate these scores. 6 for Life
provides disease risk scores as well as which risk factors are contributing to your risk, so you can
continue to improve your health status. We encourage you to add the 6 for Life Health
Assessment to your preventive health routine.
6 for Life Disease Condition
Your Results Category
Risk Score
#1. Coronary Heart Disease
(CHD)
0-20
Low
21-40
Moderate
41-70
High
71-100
Very High
33
#2. Congestive Heart Failure
(CHF)
0-20
Low
21-40
Moderate
41-70
High
71-100
Very High
23
#3. Stroke
0-20
Low
21-40
Moderate
41-70
High
71-100
Very High
39
#4. Diabetes
0-20
Low
21-40
Moderate
41-70
High
71-100
Very High
100
#5. Chronic Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
0-20
Low
21-40
Moderate
41-70
High
71-100
Very High
10
#6. Lung Cancer
0-20
Low
21-40
Moderate
41-70
High
71-100
Very High
10
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Sample, Jane
Your Results
Page 5 of 16
Condition Details
What Does it Mean to Me?
Carotid Artery Disease
One of the leading causes of stroke is fatty plaque buildup
in the carotid arteries, which may block adequate blood
flow to the brain. The carotid arteries are the main blood
supply to the brain and are located on each side of the
neck. Our screening is not meant to be a comprehensive
diagnostic exam, but rather a screening to visualize the
presence of plaque which may affect the blood flow to the
brain. Your Carotid Artery Disease Screening results are
reported as one of four (4) categories which describe the
amount of plaque buildup identified: Within Normal
Range, Mild to Moderate, Moderate, and Findings of
Possible Significance.
Mild: Fairly low to moderate amount of plaque buildup
not affecting blood flow velocities. Your Carotid Artery
Disease Screening results are Mild. This means that we
have identified a fairly low to moderate amount of plaque
buildup in one or both of your carotid arteries, which is
insignificant. The blood flow in your carotid arteries is
within normal range. Since the plaque buildup is not
affecting the rate of blood flow, the velocity measurements
for the internal carotid arteries will not be stated
specifically in this report. However, your velocities fell
below 110 centimeters per second, which is within normal
range.
You are here. Your screening
revealed minor plaque buildup
which does not affect blood flow.
Atrial Fibrillation
Atrial Fibrillation or AF is the most common type of
irregular heart rhythm or arrhythmia. During AF, the
upper chambers of the heart beat rapidly and irregularly
so that blood is not completely pumped out of the heart.
This can cause blood to collect in the heart and form a
blood clot. If the clot travels to the brain, it can cause a
stroke. Our screening is a 4-limb EKG and is not meant to
be a comprehensive 12-lead EKG (electrocardiogram). It is
a screening to identify only the presence or absence of an
atrial fibrillation heart rhythm at the time of the screening.
Normal: Your Atrial Fibrillation Screening results are
Normal. No Atrial Fibrillation detected. This means that
at the time of your screening, your heart rhythm did not
show evidence of atrial fibrillation.
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
�����������
The aorta is the largest artery in the body, traveling from
your breastbone to the level of your navel. Medical
conditions, such as high blood pressure and fatty plaque
buildup, can weaken the walls of the aorta, causing an
enlargement or aneurysm. An aneurysm can form in any
section of the aorta, but they are most common in the belly
area (abdominal aorta).
Normal: No abdominal aortic aneurysm has been
detected. Our physician has reviewed the ultrasound
images and measurements of the aorta and bifurcation of
the iliac arteries. All measurements are within normal
limits.
Our screening uses an ultrasound examination of the
abdominal aorta to screen for the presence of either type
of aneurysm that is 3 cm or greater.
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Page 6 of 16
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Peripheral arterial disease or PAD is a condition in which
fatty plaque builds up in the arteries leading to the arms
and legs. One way to screen for PAD is by measuring the
Ankle-brachial index (ABI). A small ultrasound device is
used to measure your systolic pressures in both of the
arms and legs. A ratio less than 0.90 indicates plaque
buildup and possible peripheral arterial disease. A ratio
of 0.90 to 1.3 is considered normal.
Abnormal: Your Peripheral Arterial Disease Screening
results are Abnormal. ABI index less than 0.90. This means
that you may have a borderline or higher level of plaque
buildup in the arteries in your legs. These findings are
considered to be abnormal, and we recommend further
evaluation with your primary care physician.
People with PAD may also have fatty buildup in the
arteries of the heart and because of this association, may
be at a 4 to 6 times increased risk for heart disease. Please
see your physician to determine if additional follow up
testing may be necessary. Please take this report to your
physician. Your physician may or may not determine that
further testing is necessary at this time.
Osteoporosis Risk Assessment
Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones are
severely weakened and brittle. As a result, fractures
occur easily. Life Line Screening performs an
osteoporosis risk assessment using quantitative
ultrasound to measure the density of the heel bone. The
heel is measured because its bone is similar to that found
in the spine or hip, where osteoporotic fractures occur
most.
Your T-score is -1.7 , which is Moderate Risk for Bone
Diminishment.
We recommend further evaluation with your primary care
physician. Please take this report to your physician.
Your physician may or may not determine that further
testing is necessary at this time.
This screening is a risk assessment for bone loss and is not
meant to diagnose osteoporosis. Further evaluation and
diagnostics may be considered. Talk to your physician
about your risk factors for bone loss.
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Your Results
Page 7 of 16
Condition Details
What Does it Mean to Me?
Total Cholesterol
Cholesterol comes from the foods we eat (anything from
animals) and from our body (liver). Excessive cholesterol
is a risk factor for heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.
Normal: Your Total Cholesterol is 116mg/dL (<200). It is
within the Normal Range and meets the National
Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recommendation
of total cholesterol below 200 mg/dL.
HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein)
HDL carries excess cholesterol away from your arteries.
The higher your HDL, the better. An HDL of 60 mg/dL or
higher is beneficial and considered protective against
heart disease.
Normal: Your HDL Cholesterol is 42 mg/dL (> 40). It is
Normal and meets the NCEP recommended level of 40
mg/dL or more.
LDL (Low-Density Lipoprotein)
LDL is the main source of cholesterol that contributes to
the buildup of fatty plaque in your arteries.
Normal: Your LDL Cholesterol is 54 mg/dL (<100)It
meets the NCEP recommendation of LDL cholesterol
below 100 mg/dL.
Triglyceride
Triglycerides are another contributing cause of plaque
buildup, which can cause artery blockage and heart
disease. Triglycerides circulate in your blood, but when
you have excess levels, they are stored in the body’s fat
cells.
Normal: Your Triglyceride level is 99 mg/dL (<150). It is
Normal and meets the NCEP recommendation of
triglycerides below 150 mg/dL.
Glucose
Glucose is only one indicator for diabetes risk. Obesity,
family history, ethnicity, age, blood pressure and
cholesterol are also risk factors that should be considered
in assessing your overall diabetes risk.
Normal: Your Glucose level is 91 mg/dL (<100). It is
Normal according to the American Diabetes Association
guidelines.
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Heart Risk Assessment
The Heart Risk Assessment Score is based on the
Framingham Heart Study's 10-year risk of first time hard
coronary heart disease, which includes heart attack (blood
flow blocked to the heart muscle) or dying from heart
disease in the next 10 years. The Framingham Heart
Study is a world-renown landmark study that has
generated over 2,000 published articles on the prevention
of cardiovascular disease. The algorithm scoring is part of
the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines,
issued by the National Institutes of Health. The score
applies to adults aged 20 through 79 years who do not
have existing heart disease (e.g. previous heart attack),
diabetes, carotid artery disease, peripheral arterial disease
or an abdominal aortic aneurysm. If you have any of
these conditions, your Heart Risk Assessment score is
greater than 20%, since these conditions contribute
significant risk to heart disease. The risk factors used to
determine this score include: age, gender, total cholesterol,
HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, treatment for
high blood pressure and smoking status.
Your Heart Risk Assessment Score, reported as “10-Year
CHD Risk”, is 3 %. That means about 3 of 100 people with
this level of risk will have a heart attack or die of heart
disease within the next 10 years. There are many things
you can do to reduce your risk, such as diet and exercise
in addition to medications that can help you proactively
reduce your risk. We recommend you speak with your
physician about what you can do to reduce your heart
disease risk.
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Page 8 of 16
Body Mass Index
Body Mass Index (BMI) is a number calculated from a
person's weight and height, that correlates with total body
fat amount. BMI screening is used to assess excess weight.
If your weight and height were measured at the screening
event, these values were used to calculate your BMI.
Otherwise, your self-reported weight and height were
used. Based on the calculated BMI, the National Heart,
Lung, and Blood Institute categorizes a person's BMI as
Underweight, Normal, Overweight or Obese. The term
"Overweight" means having extra body weight from
muscle, bone, fat, and/or water. The term "Obese" means
having a high amount of extra body fat. Being overweight
or obese puts you at higher risk of developing serious
health problems, including heart disease, high blood
pressure, type 2 diabetes, gallstones, breathing problems,
and certain cancers. It is important to achieve a healthy
weight to reduce your risk of these conditions. Treatment
for overweight and obesity includes lifestyle changes,
such as reducing calories, following a healthy eating plan
and being physically active.
Obese: Your Body Mass Index 34 lbs/in2 (30 and higher).
This is considered Obese according to the National Heart,
Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines and is a High Health
Risk. Medical experts recommended that you lose weight,
in order to decrease your risks of weight-related
conditions such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
Lose weight slowly, about 1/2 to 2 pounds a week and
consult your physician or a nutritionist if you need help.
Even a small amount of weight loss (just 5–10% of your
current weight) will help reduce your risks.
BMI is calculated as:
Weight in Pounds *703/Height in Inches2
Blood Pressure
Your Blood Pressure is the force of blood pushing against
the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps out blood.
Blood Pressure is given as two numbers. The top number
is the Systolic Blood Pressure, which is the pressure when
the heart beats while pumping blood. The bottom number
is the Diastolic Blood Pressure, which is the pressure
when the heart is at rest between beats. Blood pressure is
measured in mmHg (millimeters of mercury).
Normal: Your Blood Pressure is 103/64 mmHg (<120/80).
This is considered Normal according to the National High
Blood Pressure Education Program guidelines. High
blood pressure can lead to heart disease, heart failure,
stroke, kidney failure, and other health problems. Since
blood pressure tends to rise with age, it's important to
continue to monitor blood pressure regularly. Following a
healthy lifestyle can help delay or prevent this rise in
blood pressure.
Waist Measurement
Waist measurement is a useful screening for health risks
associated with excess weight. Excess abdominal fat
increases the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
This risk increases with waist measurements greater than
35 inches for women or greater than 40 inches for men.
High: Your Waist Measurement is 42 inches (Men: greater
than 40 or Women: greater than 35). This is considered
High according to the National Heart Lung and Blood
Institute. A high waist circumference increases the risk for
high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular
disease, regardless of weight.
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Page 9 of 16
6 For Life Health Assessment
Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)
Coronary Heart Disease is the leading cause of death in
the United States, and occurs when arteries that pump
blood to the heart become narrow or clogged by fatty
cholesterol deposits. When these vessels are not able to
provide enough oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle,
chest pain (Angina) develops. If the heart is without
enough oxygen for too long, death of heart tissue occurs –
also known as a heart attack. There are risk factors for
CHD that a person cannot control, such as being male –
over age 40, post-menopausal females, having a family
history of CHD, and diabetes.
Your Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) score of 33 indicates
your risk for this condition is Moderate.
It is important that you properly manage your diabetes
and focus on managing risk factors you can control to
help prevent the onset of CHD.
Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)
Your Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) score of 23 indicates
your risk for this condition is Moderate.
You indicated you have a personal history of diabetes. It
is very important that you manage your lifestyle
according to your doctor’s orders to prevent the
development of CHF and other conditions associated
with diabetes. Positively managing lifestyle behaviors
related to Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), CHF, and
diabetes can effectively keep your risk down for
developing CHF later in life. You should work closely
with your physician to maintain a healthy blood pressure,
blood sugar, cholesterol, and weight through appropriate
diet and exercise. You should also drink alcohol only in
moderation (if at all), and avoid tobacco use.
�����������
Congestive Heart Failure usually takes many years to
develop, and is often the result of heart disease, a heart
attack, or a heart valve defect. With CHF one or both of
the chambers of the heart (ventricles) responsible for
pumping oxygen-rich blood to the body become weak.
The heart muscle is not strong enough to sufficiently
pump blood to all parts of the body. When CHF occurs in
the left ventricle, blood and fluid collect in the lungs or
heart. When CHF occurs in the right ventricle, fluid
congests the legs and feet. Congestive Heart Failure is the
number one cause of death in people age 65 and older.
With CHF, the cause of death is either acute pulmonary
edema (fluid in the lungs), or an arrhythmia (irregular
heart beat).
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Page 10 of 16
Stroke
Like a heart attack, a stroke is the result of inadequate
blood flow, but the affected organ is the brain rather than
the heart. A stroke occurs when arteries bringing
oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the brain become
blocked or burst. Without the oxygen-rich blood, the
affected brain tissue begins to die. The physical effects of
a stroke depend on the area of the brain that is affected. A
stroke can lead to permanent impairment of mental
function, vision, coordination, speech, and even paralysis
and death. A Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) is similar to
a stroke, but the blood flow to the brain is only
temporarily blocked or slowed. A TIA may have the same
symptoms of a stroke, but the effects only last from a few
minutes to 24-hours and then disappear. Although the
effects of a TIA are not permanent, a TIA is a serious
warning sign of stroke risk.
Your Stroke score of 39 indicates your risk for this
condition is Moderate.
Your age and personal history of diabetes increases your
risk for having a stroke or TIA. The American Diabetes
Association reports that 2 out of every 3 people with
diabetes die from stroke or heart disease. Modifiable risk
factors for stroke or TIA include high blood pressure,
high cholesterol, and obesity. Because of your diabetes
history, it is very important you work with your
physician on a plan for eating a proper diet and getting
regular physical activity to help avoid or manage these
risk factors. Not smoking, avoiding exposure to 2nd-hand
smoke, and drinking alcohol only in moderation are also
important lifestyle choices to control your risk of stroke or
TIA.
We recommend asking your physician about additional
screening tests for stroke risk including carotid
ultrasound and screening for atrial fibrillation.
Diabetes
There are three primary types of diabetes; Type-1, Type-2,
and Gestational.
Type-1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder where the
immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas
responsible for producing insulin which is an important
hormone needed for the body to absorb blood sugar or
glucose.
Type-2 diabetes is a disease where the pancreas produces
insulin, but the body is unable to use it appropriately to
absorb blood sugar for energy. This type of diabetes is
often associated with lifestyle and modifiable risk factors
such as poor diet, physical inactivity, and being
overweight.
You indicated you have a personal history of diabetes,
therefore making your risk score 100 (very high). To
avoid complications it is important for you to properly
manage your condition. Working closely with your doctor
to manage diet and physical activity, and proper
monitoring of your blood glucose can help you avoid
negative complications associated with diabetes.
In addition to blood glucose control, there are several
screening tests recommended for people with diabetes to
prevent complications. These include: blood pressure,
complete lipid panel, eye exams, foot exams, hearing loss
and dental exams. Since diabetes puts you at risk for
serious health complications, it’s important you maintain
routine preventive care.
Gestational diabetes is a condition that occurs in pregnant
women sometimes, and is characterized by a lack of
insulin production. This form of diabetes usually goes
away shortly after child birth, but can lead to the
development of Type-2 diabetes later in life.
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Sample, Jane
Page 11 of 16
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a
breathing condition that worsens over time, making it
hard to breath and interferes with the ability to do
activities. Those with chronic bronchitis or emphysema
are said to have COPD. Symptoms of COPD include
regular coughing that produces phlegm or mucus,
shortness of breath, and chest tightness. COPD is the 3rd
leading cause of death in the United States, and cigarette
smoking is the leading risk factor for developing COPD.
Your COPD score of 10 indicates your risk for this
condition is Low.
While you have no control over your age, having asthma
or a family history of COPD, you can avoid smoking
cigarettes and 2nd-hand smoke exposure. There is no cure
for COPD, so avoiding these modifiable risks is important
to help control your risk for developing this lifelong
condition.
Lung Cancer
Lung cancer is a life-threatening condition that occurs
when cancer cells form in the lungs, usually in the cells
lining the air passages. There are two main types of lung
cancer: small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung
cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer is more common, faster
growing, and often spreads to other organs. Treatment
methods are specific to the type of lung cancer present
because each grows and spreads differently.
�����������
While cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung
cancer, other risks include exposure to 2nd-hand smoke,
air pollution, asbestos, radon gas, radiation therapy of the
lungs, and several other chemicals. However, lung cancer
can also develop if it runs in your immediate family.
Because lung cancer is the deadliest form of cancer for
both men and women, it is important to avoid the risk
associated with the condition.
Your lung cancer score of 10 indicates you are at Low risk
for this condition. It is good you do not have a personal
history of lung cancer, or for other conditions known to
increase lung cancer risk such as asthma or COPD.
However, you indicated you do have a family history of
lung cancer which increases your risk for developing the
condition. Because of your family history, it is important
for you to manage risk factors you can control. Smoking is
the leading cause of lung cancer, and also a risk factor for
many other negative health conditions. It is important
that you continue this positive lifestyle choice of
remaining smoke-free to prevent increasing your risk for
lung cancer. Avoiding 2nd-hand smoke is also an
important lifestyle choice to control your lung cancer risk.
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Page 12 of 16
6 For Life Health Assessment: Lifestyle Choices
Physical Activity
You reported 1 to 2 days a week that included 60 minutes of exercise. Currently your weekly amount of
physical activity does not meet recommended guidelines. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
and the American Heart Association (AHA) suggest you get 30 minutes of moderately intense exercise five
days a week, or 25 minutes of vigorously intense cardiovascular exercise three days a week. Activities can be
split into several short periods (e.g., 10 minutes 2-3 times a day).
Moderate-intensity physical activity means working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat,
yet still being able to carry on a conversation. It should be noted that to lose weight or maintain weight loss,
60 to 90 minutes of physical activity may be necessary. The 30-minute recommendation is for the average
healthy adult to maintain health and reduce the risk for chronic disease.
Physical activity helps control weight, cholesterol levels, and diabetes. Regular physical activity also helps
prevent heart disease, slows bone loss associated with aging, lowers the risk of certain cancers, helps reduce
anxiety and depression, can increase your energy level, and can help you sleep better.
By choosing activities that interest you and alternating your routine, you can avoid boredom and add
enjoyment to your physical activity.
Note: These recommendations are for individuals who have not been told by a health professional to avoid physical
activity. If you suffer from a health condition that limits your ability to be physically active, or that could possibly be
harmful to your health if you increase your physical activity, you should consult a physician prior to making any
changes in your activity level.
Nutrition
You reported consuming high-fat or fried foods once in a typical day. National dietary guidelines
recommend maintaining a total fat intake of no more than 20%-35% of your total daily calories. Of your daily
fat calorie intake, less than 10% should come from saturated fat, and you should consume as little trans fats as
possible.
Fats and oils are necessary parts of a healthy diet, and play essential roles in the body. Fat provides energy,
and is a carrier of important nutrients such as vitamins A, D, E, and K, and carotenoids. However, not all fats
have a positive effect on the body. Saturated fat and trans-fat should be avoided, since they may increase the
risk of heart disease and other health conditions. Most fats in your diet should come from foods containing
polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, such as fish, nuts, and vegetable oils. When selecting meat,
poultry, and milk products, you should choose those that are lean, low-fat, or fat-free.
Continue to eat a diet low in fat. Your positive eating habits will help you to control your weight, increase
your energy level, and reduce your health risks.
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Sample, Jane
Page 13 of 16
Alcohol
You reported having 0 alcoholic drinks in a typical week.
Alcohol has high calorie content. By not drinking alcohol, you avoid those extra calories. You are also
avoiding risk for many health problems related to excessive alcohol use, such as cirrhosis of the liver, and
cancer. Drinking alcohol in moderation, especially red wine, has been shown to reduce the risk of heart
disease. However, excessive alcohol consumption increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and
congestive heart failure. For pregnant women, abstaining from alcohol will reduce the risk for fetal alcohol
syndrome (FAS), which is a condition that can cause serious harm to an unborn child.
The recommended limit for alcohol is no more than 7 drinks per week for women.
Smoking and 2nd-hand Exposure
You currently do not smoke cigarettes, and have never used them in the past.
It is great that you never have smoked cigarettes. Continue to maintain your smoke-free lifestyle to avoid
increasing your risks for health problems related to tobacco use, including cancers of the mouth, throat, and
lungs, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD),
dental issues, weakened immune system, and advanced wrinkling and aging of the skin.
�����������
It is good that you are not exposed to second-hand smoke, which would place you at an increased risk for the
same negative health effects a tobacco user may experience, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.
Continue to avoid being exposed to second-hand smoke.
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Sample, Jane
Page 14 of 16
Take Action
YOUR RISK FACTORS
Based on your screening results and answers to the health questions, below are your risk factors which elevate your risk
for cardiovascular disease. *Source: This section retrieves information from test results and from your self-reported medical history.
Modifiable Risk Factors*
•Lack of Exercise
•Obesity
•Taking Aspirin Daily
Non-Modifiable Risk Factors*
• Past Smoker
• Diabetic
• Post-Menopause
• Family History of Stroke or TIA
•Family History of Diabetes
• Family History of Lung Cancer
• Asthma
• Valvular Disease or Congenital Heart Disease
•Age
• Family History of Coronary Heart Disease
KEEP INFORMED
Sign-up for our free monthly electronic newsletter to receive ongoing health benefits at
www.LifeLineScreening.com/welcome.
COPIES OF ULTRASOUND IMAGES AND EKGS
We keep copies of images and EKGs for 4 years. For a minimal fee, you may obtain copies of your carotid artery, aorta
ultrasound images and EKG printout. Please call 1-800-897-9177 to order through our Customer Service department.
** READ THIS IMPORTANT MESSAGE ABOUT FOLLOW-UP SCREENINGS **
You just took an important step towards learning your risk for cardiovascular disease. Even if you had normal results, it’s
important to make these screenings a part of your regular health regimen. Unfortunately your risk increases with each
passing year, especially if you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, excess
weight, non-active lifestyle, or family history of stroke or heart attack.
What We’re Trying to Avoid
And remember... people who have atherosclerosis often have no symptoms so
Significant Blockage
screening remains the best way to discover a problem.
Large amount of plaque,
Blood flow is significantly
So, please plan on visiting us again next year so we can catch plaque buildup at its
reduced.
earliest stages and avoid significant blockage. Congratulations again on taking an
important step in managing your health. See you next year!
A message from our Hospital Partner, The MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute at Long Beach Memorial
As a partner of Life Line Screening, the MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute at Long Beach Memorial offers a
leading, comprehensive heart program with a focus on prevention. Based on your recent screening results, you may need
to seek the help of a physician and Long Beach Memorial can help you find the care you need.
Long Beach Memorial is dedicated to providing the continuity of care after the screening process for our community and
offering the resources to stay healthy. Our expertise and dedication helped us earn recognition as one of the best regional
hospital from US News & World Report in cardiology and heart surgery.
If you are in need of a physician or have questions regarding your screening results, Long Beach Memorial offers a FREE
community service through 800-MEMORIAL. This service is available to help you find a physician, obtain valuable health
information, or register for a Long Beach Memorial sponsored event.
We hope that you will find this to be a convenient and useful resource in helping you with your healthcare needs. To
learn more or utilize this service, please call 800-MEMORIAL or log on to MemorialCare.org/LongBeach.
Screening results are solely for informational purposes and are not medical advice. Please remember that the results of these screenings must be interpreted in the context of your
clinical history. IMPORTANT: It is possible to have a normal screen with Life Line Screening and still suffer a stroke or a heart attack. Life Line Screening screens for the leading
causes of stroke, however, we do not screen for every possible cause of stroke and no screening can screen for every possible variation of vascular disease. Please note, we do not
screen your heart for heart attack risk. Specifically, we do not screen the coronary arteries, the arteries surrounding the heart. If you are experiencing symptoms of a heart attack or
stroke, SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY. Do not delay, regardless of your Life Line Screening results.
Screenings in California are provided by Life Line Mobile Screening in a physician owned practice. Screenings in Kansas are performed by Life Line Screening of America, Ltd. on
behalf of Life Line Screening Physicians, P.A. Screenings in New Hampshire, New Jersey and New York are performed by Life Line Medical Screening, LLC (Dr. Andrew
Manganaro, 70 Niagara Street, Buffalo NY, 14202). Life Line Screening does not engage in the practice of medicine in those states. This information is not intended to induce
referrals by Life Line Screening to Life Line Medical Screening, LLC for any professional medical service.
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Sample, Jane
Page 15 of 16
PLEASE GIVE THIS PAGE TO YOUR PHYSICIAN
Dear Physician of Life Line Screening Customer:
On the other side of this page are the screening results for one of your patients. These results were
found in a recent screening performed by Life Line Screening for stroke, heart disease, aortic aneurysm,
peripheral arterial disease and osteoporosis.
As a fellow physician, a vascular surgeon for over thirty years, and currently the Chief Medical Officer of
Life Line Screening, I’d like to share some thoughts with you:
Life Line Screening is the largest provider of community-based preventive health screenings in
the world. We currently provide screenings throughout the continental United States, the United
Kingdom, Ireland and Australia.
Our equipment is state of the art and our screening methods are in accordance with the latest
medical literature recommendations and are based on our database of more than 7 million
customer results.
Our technologists are specialists in their field. They conduct thousands of screenings every year
and are exceptionally well-trained.
We have an extensive ongoing quality oversight process, including random audits of all clinical
procedures. We recognize that the quality of our screenings is the key to your trust and loyalty.
I became interested in community vascular screenings during my practice when I saw many patients
come into the hospital moribund with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms or completed strokes –
disasters that could easily have been prevented had the patient known even days before that they had a
lurking problem. It also became very apparent to me when talking to my patients with early vascular
disease that simply knowing that they had it was often instrumental in changing the very behaviors
which were causing their vasculopathies – poor diet, lack of exercise, cigarette smoking, etc. Once the
patients knew they were at risk, their family doctors were able to help them change their lifestyles.
�����������
And so, our mission at Life Line Screening, since 1993, has been to make people aware of previously
undetected health problems and to encourage them to seek follow-up care with their personal physicians.
These are problems which are silent, but are discoverable by non-invasive means and treatable.
I encourage you to review these results and make an effort to discuss them with your patient. Delivering
high-quality and timely results to our customers is of utmost importance to us, but we believe the benefit
to the customer is greatly enhanced when coupled with a thorough consultation with their primary care
physician. If you have any questions about our services, please feel free to contact me at
[email protected]
With warmest collegial regards,
PLEASE TURN OVER
FOR RESULTS
Andrew J. Manganaro, MD, FACS, FACC
Chief Medical Officer
Life Line Screening
SELECTED REFERENCE:
Bickel H, Ander H, Bronner M, et al. Reduction of Long-Term Care Dependence After an 8-Year Primary Care Prevention Program
for Stroke and Dementia: the INVADE Trial. J Am Heart Assoc 2012, 1: doi: 10.1161/JAHA 112.000786.
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Sample, Jane
Page 16 of 16
Screening Date: July 11, 2013
Location: Deer Park Baptist Church
Fasting: Y
D.O.B.: 07/22/1942
Life Line Screening Results: Physician Copy
Jane Q. Sample
Screening Test
Measurement
Result
Left:
PSV: < 110cm/s
Right:
PSV: < 110cm/s
No Atrial
Fibrillation Detected
Heart Rate: 083
Beats/min
Risk Category
Carotid Artery
Disease
Blood flow cm/s
Atrial Fibrillation
4-Limb EKG
Abdominal Aortic
Aneurysm
cm
<3cm
Normal
Peripheral Arterial
Disease
Ankle Brachial Index
Left Side: 0.82
Right Side: 1.08
Left: Abnormal
Right: Normal
Osteoporosis
Bone Mineral
Density
-1.7
Moderate Risk
Complete Lipid
Panel
mg/dL
TC: 116
LDL: 54
HDL: 42
Trig: 99
TC: Desirable
LDL: Optimal
HDL: Desirable
Trig: Normal
Glucose
mg/dL
91
Normal
Blood Pressure
mmHg
103/64
Normal
BMI
Body Mass Index
34
High Risk
Waist
Inches
42
High
Heart Risk
Assessment
10-yr Heart
Risk %
3
Moderate Risk
Incidental
findings
Left: Mild
Right: Mild
Normal
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Sample, Jane