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Transcript
Collaboration and Communication
Strategies for Parents and Schools
PRESENTED BY
TRACY LEWIS-LEE
FA M I L Y R E S O U R C E C O O R D I N A T O R
COLONIAL HEIGHTS PUBLIC SCHOOLS
JUNE 19, 2014
What’s the difference between
Communication and Collaboration?
What is
communication?
 Merriam-Webster.com defines
communication as: the act or
process of using words, sounds,
signs, or behaviors to express or
exchange information or to
express your ideas, thoughts,
feelings, etc. to someone else.
 Region One PRC’s DVD, “Recipe for
What is
collaboration?
Student Success” defines
collaboration as: a partnership with
the purpose of working together for
a common goal. Collaboration is not
an “activity”; it’s an ongoing process.
One of the best ways to foster
collaboration is to learn how to
communicate effectively with one
another in order to build trust.
Facts about Communication
The Laws of Forgetting
 We forget 50% of what we hear immediately.
 We forget 75% of what we hear within two months.
 Of the 25% that we do remember, only 60% is correct.
The other 40% is made up of things that we
“remember”…that were never said in the first place!
How We Really Communicate
 Vocabulary (7%)
 Vocal Inflections (38%)
 Nonverbal Behavior (55%)
Tips for Good Communication
Body Language
Do:
Don’t:
 Make good eye contact
 Cross your arms
 Smile
 Roll your eyes
 Lean forward
 Compulsively check your
 Nod to show that you’re
phone and/or clock
 Sigh heavily
paying attention
Be Self Aware
 Do you have preconceived notions about how this
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communication is going to go (in other words, are you
remembering the adage, “There are two sides to every
story.”)?
Are you judging the teacher or other school personnel?
What kind of tone is your “default” tone?
Do you understand that the teacher has (and is supposed
to have!) a different perspective from your own?
Are you an active listener and do you have any “listening
bad habits”?
Help the School Understand Your Perspective
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Say things like:
I’m not an educator. Please explain this to me in a way that I can
understand.
I’m not questioning you because I disagree; I’m only trying to
understand.
Let me explain to you what a typical evening in my home looks
like.
I have other children who also need my attention.
Please clarify for me exactly what it is that you’d like me to do.
I have hopes and dreams for my child that may seem
unreasonable to you, but let’s try to aim for them anyway.
The Power of “Reframing”
 Reframing is the act of changing a
What is
reframing?
question or a statement so that the
perspective shifts—sometimes from a
“negative” into a “positive”.
Reframing can also provide for an
entirely different set of solutions to a
question or problem.
Examples of Reframing
Change this:
To this:
 My mother is always
 My mother has a strong
interfering.
 Why did you set up your
classroom this way?
 What is the sum of 5 + 5?
need to protect me.
 This classroom set-up is
interesting! Can you tell
me why this works well for
you?
 What two numbers add up
to 10?
Reframing
If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the
solution, I would spend the first fifty-five minutes determining the
proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I
could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”
-Albert Einstein
Watch:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwjAAgGi-90
What You Can Do to Make
Meetings Run More Smoothly
 Keep all of your child’s records in one
Prior to the
meeting
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place.
Read through all information that the
school sends home prior to the
meeting.
Give thought to what you believe your
child’s specific problems, issues,
strengths, and talents are.
Make a written list of questions and
items to cover.
Determine whether you will bring your
child to the meeting.
 Arrive a few minutes early.
Right before the
meeting
 Shake the hands of those present
and/or offer a smile.
 Find out how much time is scheduled
for the meeting.
 Show respect and expect if from
During the
meeting
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others.
Manage your emotions.
Be specific and clear.
Ask questions if you’re unfamiliar with
terms that are used.
Use praise and thank the staff for
their hard work.
End by summarizing what you believe
that you heard.
End the meeting on a positive note, if
possible.
Sources
Communication. (n.d.). In Merriam Webster Online. Retrieved from http://www.merriamwebster.com/dictionary/communication.
Garber, Peter R. (2008). 50 Communications Activities, Icebreakers, and Exercises. Amherst,
Massachusetts: HRD Press.
Goldberg, Marsha. (2005, November). Communication Skills. Conducted at the 2005 State PRC
Meeting, Stafford, Virginia.
A Guide to Effective Communication [Video file]. Retrieved from
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwjAAgGi-90.
Lee, Charlene. Special Education: A Parent’s Perspective. Conducted for Chesterfield County Public
Schools, Richmond, Virginia.
Seelig, Tina. (2013, January 14). Shift Your Lens: The Power of Re-Framing Problems. Retrieved from
http://stvp.stanford.edu/blog/?p=6435.