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Mal’s Ecological
&
Mal’s Environmental
Environmental
Services
&
PTY. LTD.
Ecological Services
in Ecological
Management
in Ecological
Management
ConsultingConsulting
and Restoration
and Restoration
ACN370
166 603 345
ABN 70 165 787
ABN 70 165 787 370
Vertebrate Fauna Assessments
of seven
Mornington Peninsula Shire
reserves located within
Tootgarook Wetlands
Prepared for
Mornington Peninsula
Shire
PO Box
247
Strategic Planning
Unit 3916
Shoreham
03 and
59 863
448
June purposes
2014 Ph
Mornington Peninsula Shire Council has released this report for information
only
its content
M 0438
898be
325
does not necessarily represent the views of Council. Whether any of the recommendations
should
E
adopted and implemented is a matter or future consideration, including
being
subject to normal budgetary
MAIL
malcolmlegg@bigpond.com
processes.
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
FAUNA SURVEY OF SEVEN MORNINGTON PENINSULA SHIRE SITES LOCATED WITHIN
TOOTGAROOK WETLANDS, 25th June 2014.
Document information
Mal’s Ecological
&
Environmental Services
PTY. LTD.
Consulting in Ecological
Management
and Restoration
ACN 166 603 345
ABN 70 165 787 370
PO Box 247
Shoreham
Victoria 3916
Report prepared for:
Mornington Peninsula Shire
Strategic Planning Unit
Prepared by:
Malcolm Legg
Citation: Mal’s Ecological & Environmental Services 2014, Fauna
assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Shire reserves
located within Tootgarook Wetland. Report for Mornington
Peninsula Shire Strategic Planning Unit. Author Malcolm
Legg.
Document control
Version
Draft 01
Draft 02
Reviewed
Garrique Pergl
Garrique Pergl
Date issued
May 14th 2014
June 25th 2014
M 0438 898 325
Email
malcolmlegg@bigpond.com
Acknowledgements
Mal’s Ecological & Environmental Services acknowledges the
contribution of the following people in undertaking this study
x
x
Garrique Pergl (MPS Strategic Planning Unit)
Cameron Brown (Save Tootgarook Swamp Inc.) for
helping with field work & supplying some photos for
this report.
x
Phil Hughes MPS GIS unit.
Profiles Front Page
Top to bottom:
x Australasian Bittern (Bird Life Australia C. Brown 2014)
x Royal Spoonbill with breeding plumage (M. Legg 2013)
x Black Shouldered Kite (M. Legg 2013)
x Little Pied Cormorant (M. Legg 2013)
x Retarding Basin (M. Legg 2013)
x Spotted Marsh Frog (M. Legg 2013)
All other images through-out this report were photographed at
the study sites and are Copy-right M. Legg 2014 or C. Brown 2014
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Executive Summary
Mal’s Environmental & Ecological Services was commissioned by the Mornington Peninsula Shire to
conduct fauna assessments (including indigenous and feral fauna) across seven sites within
Tootgarook Wetlands. The study area is located approximately 65 km south of Melbourne CBD. The
seven study sites are public land managed by or the responsibility of Melbourne Water and the
Mornington Peninsula Shire. The study sites include the following:
Table a: Locations of the seven study sites
Site
Address
Size
3 Dutton Street Rosebud West
App. 0.7 hectares
Melbourne Water Retarding Basin
66 Henry Wilson Drive Rosebud
West
1.41 hectares
Hiscock Road Reserve
Boneo Road to Truemans Road
Rosebud West
Approximately 3 km long
50 meter wide strip either side
40 Colchester Road Rosebud West
8.85 hectares
Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
12 St Elmos Close Rosebud West
11.52 hectares
Truemans Road (former landfill
site)
240 Hiscock Road Rosebud West
50 meter lineal wide strip either
side abutting eastern boundary and
observations on the land known as
92 Elizabeth Avenue.
Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
64 Swans Way Rosebud West
1.28+ hectares
Land at South-west
Subdivision
Mornington
Reserve
corner
Peninsula
of
Shire
Fauna surveys and mapping were undertaken from October 2013 to May 2014 with emphasis on
obtaining base line data, population densities of birds, amphibians, nocturnal fauna and feral
species, conducting FEIS assessments of broad vegetation communities within the study sites and
listing recommendations to help manage the sites in order to retain their biodiversity values into the
future.
Key ecological values
The field study identified key ecological values for the seven sites as follows:139 species of native fauna and 13 species of introduced fauna were observed and composed of:x One species of Decapod Crustacean
x Six species of fish of which two species are introduced
x Seven species of Amphibians
x 14 reptile species (of which one species is a tortoise, ten species are lizards and three
species are snakes
x 108 species of birds of which 6 species are introduced
x 16 species of mammals of which five species are introduced
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Government legislation and policy
Key biodiversity legislation and policy is provided and summarised in the table below.
Table b: Key biodiversity legislation and policy
Legislation / Policy
Relevant ecological feature on site
EPBC Act
Habitat for Nationally threatened fauna species and
migratory bird species
Study area provides habitat for several FFG listed
fauna species
Future indigenous vegetation to be cleared for
development and fire protection measures
10+ noxious weeds recorded
FFG Act
Planning & Environmental Act
CaLP Act
National and State significant species identified during this survey at the study area
The National and State significant species identified during this survey is provided and summarised
in the table below.
Table c: Summary of significant species observed within the study area
Species name
EPBC Act listed species
Australasian Bittern
Listed Migratory birds
Latham’s Snipe
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Great Egret
White-bellied Sea-Eagle
FFG Act/ DSE Advisory List species
Southern Toadlet
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Pied Cormorant
Australasian Shoveller
Freckled Duck
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Great Egret
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Area of value within the study area
Areas of Tall Marsh provide shelter, feeding and
possibly breeding sites for this species. Recent
records confirm two individuals are present.
Site has raised grasslands and habitat adjacent
Wetlands and edges provides habitat
Wetlands provide foraging sites and possible breeding
sites
Wetlands and edges provides habitat
Wetlands provide extensive breeding habitat
Wetlands and creeks provide feeding and breeding
habitats
Raised grasslands, scrub and adjacent vegetation
provide breeding and foraging habitats
Raised grasslands, scrub and adjacent vegetation
provide breeding and foraging habitats
Deepish waters provide feeding habitats
Wetlands provide foraging and breeding habitats
Wetlands provide foraging and possibly breeding
habitats
Dense vegetation along the creeks and wetland edges
provides foraging and breeding habitats
Dense vegetation along the wetland edges provides
foraging and breeding habitats
Wetlands provide foraging sites and possible breeding
sites
Wetlands provide foraging sites and possible breeding
sites
Scrub patches and wetlands provides foraging and
breeding sites
4
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species name
Area of value within the study area
Australasian Bittern
Areas of Tall Marsh provide shelter, feeding and
possibly breeding sites for this species.
Wetlands provide foraging sites and possible breeding
sites
Site has raised grasslands and habitat adjacent
Species only flies over the study site
Area is used for forging, breeding in the wetlands is
unknown
Wetlands provide foraging sites
Area is used for forging, breeding in the wetlands is
unknown
Species only flies over the study site
Raised grasslands and scrub patches are used for
foraging and breeding
Royal Spoonbill
Lathams Snipe
Pacific Gull
Whiskered Tern
White-bellied Sea-Eagle
Spotted Harrier
White-throated Needletail
White-footed Dunnart
Aims and Objectives
The brief for this project is to identify the presence of vertebrate and Decapod Crustaceans at the
seven designated survey sites on public land.
The outcomes of the study will inform the:x Mornington Peninsula Shire Tootgarook Wetland Strategic Review
x Development and implementation of a joint Melbourne Water and Mornington Peninsula
Shire Environmental monitoring program
x Future prioritised environmental management and protection programs across the wetland.
Study limitations
The field survey was conducted during late spring, summer and autumn of 2013/14 which is
commonly an optimal time of survey. However a number of reasons exist as to why not all
vertebrate species may have not been detected at the sites including low individual local species
populations, migration, predation of native species by native & introduced fauna and variable
seasonal conditions. A number of the study sites are partially subject to dense vegetation which may
have reduced the detection of faunal species and population densities.
Vegetation
In 2006 a study conducted by Arthur Rylah Institute for the Mornington Peninsula Shire determined
that 18.5 % of complex native vegetation remained across the Mornington Peninsula.
The vegetation and associated habitat of the Tootgarook Wetland is today highly modified and
fragmented, associated with changes to the broader Tootgarook Wetland catchment following
European settlement.
The native vegetation within the study area has some connectivity with broader areas of vegetation
and associated habitats to the south & east and the greater Tootgarook Wetland area.
The study area and nearby wetlands supports 12 Ecological Vegetation Classes (EVC’s) as follows:5
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Coast Banksia Woodland, Damp Sands Herb-rich Woodland, Freshwater Swamp Scrub, Coastal
Alkaline Scrub, South Gippsland Plains Grassland, Sedge Wetland, Aquatic Herbland, Brackish
Wetland, Tall Marsh, Gahnia Sedgeland, Brackish Sedgeland and Calcerous Wet Herbland complex. A
number of these EVC’s are dependent on the presence of inundated ground surfaces and high water
tables. Many EVC’s are assessed as endangered in the Gippsland Plains Bioregion. The quality of
vegetation within these EVC’s is generally of high standard with little weed invasion present.
Conclusion and General Recommendations
1. The study area’s sites contain a wide range of terrestrial and semi-permanent wetland
habitats which supports a diverse range of EVC’s that are assessed as endangered in the bioregion. The seven study sites also support a diverse and significant range of indigenous
fauna species listed under commonwealth and state biodiversity acts. A recommendation is
made, that collectively, these sites are of national and state significance and should be
protected accordingly.
2. Two of the study sites support the nationally endangered Australasian Bittern (listed as
endangered on both the EPBC Act 1999 and FFG Act 1988) and needs the full protection
they deserve. A monitoring program designed to protect and monitor breeding and foraging
sites needs to be immediately implemented. Considering there is only an estimated 800 to
1200 individuals left in Australia and are currently on the decline.
3. Adopt management recommendations from the Australasian Bittern Recovery and Action
Plans and Implement through-out the greater Tootgarook Swamp.
4. The Tall Marsh EVC within Tootgarook Wetlands appears to be the bitterns preferred
breeding and foraging habitat and requires full protection on both private and public land
including at 92 Elizabeth Avenue.
5. The Tootgarook Wetland and its unique range of habitats support a high diversity of
vertebrate fauna species and population densities when compared to most other sites on
the Mornington Peninsula.
6. The nature of the Tootgarook Wetland is an ephemeral wetland and as such it supports a
wide range of fauna species occupying habitats on a permanent or seasonal basis.
7. The results from this study are recommended to inform the development and
implementation of a longitudinal environmental monitoring program that captures changes
to species diversity and abundance in response to variable seasonal conditions particularly
for migratory species.
8. That some of the existing planning scheme zonings and overlay controls under the
Mornington Peninsula Shire Planning scheme for the seven study sites do not recognise the
presence of and need to protect designated significant biodiversity values. Investigate
changing some overlays to conservation.
9. Existing reserve asset maintenance practices conducted for council at some study sites (eg
40 Colchester Road) appear to involve the removal of native vegetation and potential
associated habitat loss. Other study sites (eg former Trumans Road landfill site undeveloped
proportion and Hiscock Road Reserve) appear to be largely unmanaged for the protection of
biodiversity values present on the council land. At such sites there is a concern or without
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
regard for the protection of biodiversity values when biodiversity values are being managed
on private properties adjacent (eg Boneo Park and the Melbourne Water retarding basin).
10. A strong recommendation is made for the extension of existing public land feral fauna and
weed management programs to include the VicRoads Freeway reservation.
11. That the shire seeks to further support Save Tootgarook Swamp Inc. to help increase
community knowledge and monitoring of biodiversity and cultural values of the wetland.
12. That the shire and Melbourne Water adopt a priority to direct resources to improve the
interpretation of wetland environmental values and their protection to the different land
users of the wetland including occupants of the industrial estate, commercial area,
residential area and schools of the greater wetland catchment.
13. That where applicable, the shire seek to accommodate vegetation offsets on shire owned
land assets in the wetland area, arising from vegetation clearance associated with approved
town planning permits elsewhere.
14. And implement future environmental management priorities and a Tootgarook Wetland
environmental monitoring program.
15. That the shire and Melbourne Water increase the priority to rehabilitate biolinks along
Hiscock Road between Truemans Road and Boneo Road and along Chinaman’s Creek from
Browns Road to its mouth. Adopt and revegetate in cleared areas the biolink along Hiscock
Road and Drum Drum Alloc Creek which will eventually link Tootgarook Wetlands with
Arthur’s Seat State Park. The main breaks which need revegetating within the Drum Drum
Alloc Creek biolink are between Boneo Road and Jetty Road.
16. Recommendations for fauna species contained in Action Plans and Recovery Plans under the
EPBC Act 1999 and the FFG Act 1988 be sought to be implemented across public and private
land of the Tootgarook Wetlands.
17. Recommendations for Mornington Peninsula Burrowing Crayfish:x
Too be identified and keyed out to species level by the Victorian Museum.
x
Those future Tootgarook Wetland environmental monitoring programs include
surveys for the presence/absence of Burrowing Crayfish as an indicator of the
environmental health of the water table.
18. Wetland interpretational signage should include:
x
An interpretational centre needs to be constructed within Elizabeth Avenue
(possible 92 Elizabeth Avenue) depicting interpretive signage and a look-out tower.
Such signage should depict the entire Tootgarook Wetland and its biodiversity
values interpretive signage could also be erected at prominent visible sites including
in the vicinity of Chinaman’s Creek along Point Nepean Road.
x
Council and Melbourne Water as the managers of the seven study sites should
develop and install signage at each site interpreting the environmental, cultural and
hydro-geological functions of the land parcel at a prominent location within each
site.
7
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Contents
1.
INTRODUCTION
1.1
Study site
1.2
Project Background
1.3
Geology
1.4
History
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2.
METHODS
2.1
Existing Information
2.1.1 Desktop assessment
2.2
Fauna survey techniques
2.2.1 Further details of the fauna survey techniques
2.2.2 Rapid Assessment Tool using FEIS's in BVT's
2.3
Limitations
2.4
Research Permit
2.5
Data handling and storage
2.6
Mapping
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3.
RESULTS & DISCUSSIONS
3.1
South-west corner of 3 Dutton St, Rosebud west
3.1.1 Study site
3.1.2 EVC's
3.1.3 Fauna detected within the study site
3.1.4 Results of field work conducted within the study site
3.1.4.1 Bird species and population densities recorded for each month
3.1.4.2 Elliot trap survey results
3.1.4.3 Feral predator scat analysis
3.1.4.4 Spotlight walk results
3.1.4.5 Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
3.1.4.6 Scout-guard camera deployment
3.1.4.7 Current status of BVT ecosystems using FEIS rapid assessment tool
3.1.5 Significant Fauna
3.1.5.1 Significant fauna detected through-out
3.1.5.2 Significance of the study area
3.1.5.3 Habitat significance
3.1.5.4 Defining significant species
3.1.6 Discussion
3.1.6.1 Indigenous Fauna
3.1.6.1 1 Decapod Crustacean
3.1.6.1.2 Amphibians
3.1.6.1.3 Reptiles
3.1.6.1.4 Birds
3.1.6.1.4.1 Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
3.1.6.1.5 Mammals
3.1.6.1.6 Feral Mammals
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.1.6.2 Habitat changing weeds
3.1.6.3 Relative importance of key habitats
3.1.6.4 Bio-links
3.1.6.5 FEIS assessments
3.1.6.6 Monitoring FEIS's and population densities
3.1.7 Recommendations
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3.2 Melbourne Water Retarding Basin
3.2.1 Study site
3.2.2 EVC's
3.2.3 Fauna detected within the study site
3.2.4 Results of field work conducted within the study site
3.2.4.1 Fish sampling results
3.2.4.2 Bird species and population densities recorded for each month
3.2.4.3 Elliot trap survey results
3.2.4.4 Feral predator scat analysis
3.2.4.5 Spotlight walk results
3.2.4.6 Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
3.2.4.7 Scout-guard camera deployment
3.2.4.8 Current status of BVT ecosystems using FEIS rapid assessment tool
3.2.5 Significant Fauna
3.2.5.1 Significant fauna detected through-out
3.2.5.2 Significance of the study area
3.2.5.3 Habitat significance
3.2.5.4 Defining significant species
3.2.6 Discussion
3.2.6.1 Indigenous Fauna
3.2.6.1.1 Decapod Crustacean
3.2.6.1.2 Fish
3.2.6.1.3 Amphibians
3.2.6.1.4 Reptiles
3.2.6.1.5 Birds
3.2.6.1.5.1 Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
3.2.6.1.6 Mammals
3.2.6.1.7 Feral Mammals
3.2.6.2 Habitat changing weeds
3.2.6.3 Relative importance of key habitats
3.2.6.4 Bio-links
3.2.6.5 FEIS assessments
3.2.6.6 Monitoring FEIS's and population densities
3.2.7 Recommendations
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3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
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Hiscock Road Reserve
Study site
EVC's
Fauna detected within the study site
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.4 Results of field work conducted within the study site
3.3.4.1 Fish sampling results
3.3.4.2 Bird species and population densities recorded for each month
3.3.4.3 Elliot trap survey results
3.3.4.4 Feral predator scat analysis
3.3.4.5 Spotlight walk results
3.3.4.6 Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
3.3.4.7 Scout-guard camera deployment
3.3.4.8 Current status of BVT ecosystems using FEIS rapid assessment tool
3.3.5 Significant Fauna
3.3.5.1 Significant fauna detected through-out
3.3.5.2 Significance of the study area
3.3.5.3 Habitat significance
3.3.5.4 Defining significant species
3.3.6 Discussion
3.3.6.1 Indigenous Fauna
3.3.6.1.1 Decapod Crustacean
3.3.6.1.2 Fish
3.3.6.1.3 Amphibians
3.3.6.1.4 Reptiles
3.3.6.1.5 Birds
3.3.6.1.5.1 Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
3.3.6.1.6 Mammals
3.3.6.1.7 Feral Mammals
3.3.6.2 Habitat changing weeds
3.3.6.3 Relative importance of key habitats
3.3.6.4 Bio-links
3.3.6.5 FEIS assessments
3.3.6.6 Monitoring FEIS's and population densities
3.3.7 Recommendations
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3.4
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4
3.4.4.1
3.4.4.2
3.4.4.3
3.4.4.4
3.4.4.5
3.4.4.6
3.4.4.7
3.4.5
3.4.5.1
3.4.5.2
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40 Colchester Road Reserve
Study site
EVC's
Fauna detected within the study site
Results of field work conducted within the study site
Bird species and population densities recorded for each month
Elliot trap survey results
Feral predator scat analysis
Spotlight walk results
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
Scout-guard camera deployment
Current status of BVT ecosystems using FEIS rapid assessment tool
Significant Fauna
Significant fauna detected through-out
Significance of the study area
10
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4.5.3 Habitat significance
3.4.5.4 Defining significant species
3.4.6 Discussion
3.4.6.1 Indigenous Fauna
3.4.6.1 1 Decapod Crustacean
3.4.6.1.2 Amphibians
3.4.6.1.3 Reptiles
3.4.6.1.4 Birds
3.4.6.1.4.1 Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
3.4.6.1.5 Mammals
3.4.6.1.6 Feral Mammals
3.4.6.2 Habitat changing weeds
3.4.6.3 Relative importance of key habitats
3.4.6.4 Bio-links
3.4.6.5 FEIS assessments
3.4.6.6 Illegal rubbish dumping
3.4.6.7 Monitoring FEIS's and population densities
3.4.7 Recommendations
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3.5
Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
3.5.1 Study site
3.5.2 EVC's
3.5.3 Fauna detected within the study site
3.5.4 Results of field work conducted within the study site
3.5.4.1 Fish sampling results
3.5.4.2 Bird species and population densities recorded for each month
3.5.4.3 Elliot trap survey results
3.5.4.4 Feral predator scat analysis
3.5.4.5 Spotlight walk results
3.5.4.6 Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
3.5.4.7 Scout-guard camera deployment
3.5.4.8 Current status of BVT ecosystems using FEIS rapid assessment tool
3.5.5 Significant Fauna
3.5.5.1 Significant fauna detected through-out
3.5.5.2 Significance of the study area
3.5.5.3 Habitat significance
3.5.5.4 Defining significant species
3.5.6 Discussion
3.5.6.1 Indigenous Fauna
3.3.6.1.1 Decapod Crustacean
3.5.6.1.2 Fish
3.5.6.1.3 Amphibians
3.5.6.1.4 Reptiles
3.5.6.1.5 Birds
3.5.6.1.5.1 Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
3.5.6.1.6 Mammals
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.6.1.7 Feral Mammals
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3.5.6.2 Habitat changing weeds
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3.5.6.3 Relative importance of key habitats
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3.5.6.4 Bio-links
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3.5.6.5 FEIS assessments
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3.3.6.6 Comparing the results of this survey with the 2005-06 survey
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3.5.6.7 Monitoring FEIS's and population densities
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3.5.6.8 Encroachment and vegetation removal on the northern boundary associated with
Village Glen Golf Course
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3.5.7 Recommendations
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3.6
Truemans Road Landfill site (50m either side)
3.6.1 Study site
3.6.2 EVC's
3.6.3 Fauna detected within the study site
3.6.4 Results of field work conducted within the study site
3.6.4.1 Fish sampling results
3.6.4.2 Bird species and population densities recorded for each month
3.6.4.3 Elliot trap survey results
3.6.4.4 Feral predator scat analysis
3.6.4.5 Spotlight walk results
3.6.4.6 Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
3.6.4.7 Scout-guard camera deployment
3.6.4.8 Current status of BVT ecosystems using FEIS rapid assessment tool
3.6.5 Significant Fauna
3.6.5.1 Significant fauna detected through-out
3.6.5.2 Significance of the study area
3.6.5.3 Habitat significance
3.6.5.4 Defining significant species
3.6.6 Discussion
3.6.6.1 Indigenous Fauna
3.6.6.1.1 Decapod Crustacean
3.6.6.1.2 Fish
3.6.6.1.3 Amphibians
3.6.6.1.4 Reptiles
3.6.6.1.5 Birds
3.6.6.1.5.1 Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
3.6.6.1.6 Mammals
3.6.6.1.7 Feral Mammals
3.6.6.2 Habitat changing weeds
3.6.6.3 Relative importance of key habitats
3.6.6.4 Bio-links
3.6.6.5 FEIS assessments
3.6.6.6 Monitoring FEIS's and population densities
3.6.7 Recommendations
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7
Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
3.7.1 Study site
3.7.2 EVC's
3.7.3 Fauna detected within the study site
3.7.4 Results of field work conducted within the study site
3.7.4.1 Bird species and population densities recorded for each month
3.7.4.2 Elliot trap survey results
3.7.4.3 Feral predator scat analysis
3.7.4.4 Spotlight walk results
3.7.4.5 Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
3.7.4.6 Scout-guard camera deployment
3.7.4.7 Current status of BVT ecosystems using FEIS rapid assessment tool
3.7.5 Significant Fauna
3.7.5.1 Significant fauna detected through-out
3.7.5.2 Significance of the study area
3.7.5.3 Habitat significance
3.7.5.4 Defining significant species
3.7.6 Discussion
3.7.6.1 Indigenous Fauna
3.7.6.1 1 Decapod Crustacean
3.7.6.1.2 Amphibians
3.7.6.1.3 Reptiles
3.7.6.1.4 Birds
3.7.6.1.4.1 Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
3.7.6.1.5 Mammals
3.7.6.1.6 Feral Mammals
3.7.6.2 Habitat changing weeds
3.7.6.3 Relative importance of key habitats
3.7.6.4 Bio-links
3.7.6.5 FEIS assessments
3.7.6.6 Monitoring FEIS's and population densities
3.7.7 Recommendations
186
186
186
187
189
189
191
191
191
192
192
193
194
194
195
195
195
198
198
198
198
199
200
203
204
205
206
207
209
209
210
210
4.
OVER-ALL RECOMMENDATIONS
212
5.
REFERENCES
215
APPENDIX 1 Fauna detectected in the sth-west corner of 3 Dutton Street
APPENDIX 2 Fauna detectected at the Rosebud West Industrial Estate Retyarding Basin
APPENDIX 3 Fauna detectected along Hiscocks Road Reserrve
APPENDIX 4 Fauna detectected at 40 Colchester Road Reserve
APPENDIX 5 Fauna detectected at Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
APPENDIX 6 Fauna detectected along the eastern edge of Truemans Road Landfill Site
APPENDIX 7 Fauna detectected at Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
APPENDIX 8 Fauna survey results from all 7 study sites and previou surveys
APPENDIX 9 DSE Atlas of Victorian Wildlife (2013) & EPBC Protected Matters Search Tool
APPENDIX 10 Threatened Fauna management & recommendations
APPENDIX 11 Further details of the fauna survey techniques
216
219
222
226
229
233
236
239
245
248
252
13
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
APPENDIX 12 FEIS methods
MAP 1
MAP 2
MAP 3
MAP 4
MAP 5
MAP 6
MAP 7
MAP 8
MAP 9
MAP 10
MAP 11
MAP 12
MAP 13
MAP 14
MAP 15
MAP 16
MAP 17
MAP 18
255
Locations of the 7 study sites within Tootgarook Swamp
17
Locations of the previous fauna surveys within Tootgarook Swamp
21
Locations of state significant fauna species within 3 Dutton Street
33
Locations of state significant fauna species within the retarding basin reserve 57
Locations of the 3 sections along Hiscock Road Reserve
75
Locations of state significant fauna species within Hiscock Road Reserve
88
Locations of state significant fauna species within 40 Colchester Road Reserve116
Locations of state significant fauna species within Sanctuary Park Bushland
Reserve
141
Locations of state significant fauna species within Truemans Road Landfill Site 171
Locations of the 3 reaches within Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
188
Locations of state significant fauna species within Tern Ave. Bushland Reserve 197
Locations of fauna sampling sites within 3 Dutton Street
260
Locations of fauna sampling sites within the retarding basin reserve
261
Locations of fauna sampling sites within Hiscock Road Reserve
262
Locations of fauna sampling sites within 40 Colchester Road Reserve
263
Locations of fauna sampling sites within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
264
Locations of fauna sampling sites within Truemans Road Landfill Site
265
Locations of fauna sampling sites within Tern Ave. Bushland Reserve
266
14
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
1.0
INTRODUCTION
Malcolm Legg from Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services was commissioned by
Garrique Pergl (Mornington Peninsula Shire’s Strategic Planning Unit) to conduct fauna
assessments within seven Mornington Peninsula Shire managed reserve and properties. The
reserves and properties are located within Tootgarook Wetland on the Mornington Peninsula
and within the state of Victoria. The study was conducted from October 2013 to April 2014
with emphasis on:
x
obtaining base line data on all vertebrate fauna species within the seven sites,
x
presence of national, state, regional and locally threatened fauna species within the
seven sites,
x
population densities of birds, amphibians, nocturnal fauna and feral species within
the seven sites,
x
conducting FEIS assessments of broad vegetation communities within the seven
sites,
x
and make recommendations to inform the shire’s strategic review of the Tootgarook
Wetland and develop a monitoring program within, Also to prioritise appropriate
environmental management.
1.1 Study sites
The seven study sites which were surveyed include:
x
South-west corner of 3 Dutton Street (MPS),
x
Melbourne Water Retarding Basin, 66 Henry Wilson Drive Rosebud West,
x
Hiscock Road Reserve (MPS & MW managed),
x
40 Colchester Road Reserve (MPS),
x
Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve (MPS),
x
Truemans Road Landfill site (50m either side of eastern boundary and observations
into 92 Elizabeth Avenue) (MPS) and
x
Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve (MPS)
1.2 Project background
The scope of works proposed by Mal’s Environmental & Ecological Services (MEES) and
Mornington Peninsula Shire council (MPS) included the following:
x
a review of fauna databases at each site,
x
targeted fauna surveys using appropriate methods and deploying during
appropriate seasons,
x
conduct indigenous and feral fauna vertebrate surveys at each site,
15
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
x
to obtain baseline data on all indigenous and feral fauna vertebrate species,
and
x
to write a comprehensive report on the project including: introduction,
history,
methods,
results,
discussions,
recommendations,
maps
and
appendix lists.
This report aims to:
x
Maintain the study site’s known significant fauna values,
x
assess all fieldwork data and information from previous surveys and present
surveys,
x
discuss indigenous and feral fauna detected at each site,
x
discuss fauna not present during survey period.
x
provide recommendations to ensure the site’s significant biodiversity values
are maintained.
1.3 Geology
After examining maps from the Geological Survey of Victoria 1967, three different soil types
were determined to exist within the study sites and Include:
x
Swamp deposits were formed in the Lower Pliocene period of the Tertiary era and are
derived from Lagoonal Deposits which consist of sandy & concretionary limestone,
and calcareous & ligneous clay.
x
The soils throughout the raised South Gippsland Plains Grasslands were formed in
the Pleistocene period of the Quaternary era and were derived from Aeolian
deposits, shaped into subdued dunes, with siliceous and calcareous sands with
aeolianite.
x
Soils to the north of the swamp are derived from raised coastal deposits consisting
of siliceous and calcareous sands with shell beds. They were formed in the recent
period of the Quaternary era.
(Geological Survey of Victoria 1967).
The wetland is also buffered by parabolic sand dunes which is composed of calcareous and
originally derived from marine shells. They are also sometimes aggregated into hard dune
limestone and sandstone (bird 1975).
The study area has a maritime climate with wet moist winters and dry warm summers.
16
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Map 1: Locations of the seven Tootgarook Wetland study sites
17
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
1.4 History
The study area falls within the traditional lands of the Aboriginal territory of the Boon
Wurrung clans of the Kulin Nation. In the late 1700‟s and early 1800‟s Port Phillip Bay was
discovered by Europeans and the greater area was settled around the mid 1800‟s. During
the mid and late 1800‟s the Mornington Peninsula was cleared of its indigenous vegetation
from the ridges to the coast associated with timber harvesting for lime kilns, building and
agriculture. In recent decades the footprint of indigenous vegetation (including weeds) has
expanded to 18.5%.
Tootgarook Wetland is located on the Mornington Peninsula, Victoria and falls within the
parish of Boneo and West Rosebud. The wetland is fed by Drum Drum Alloc Creek which
flows from the Rosebud sands to the east, and drains into Port Phillip via Chinaman‟s Creek.
The two creeks have long been linked by a constructed drain (now Chinaman‟s Creek) which
runs south to north through the centre of the wetland. The original course of Chinaman‟s
Creek ran through Rosebud West which is now known as the Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve.
The wetland acts as a retarding basin, protecting low-lying residential land between it and
Port Phillip Bay.
The name Tootgarook means “Land of the growling frog”.
Tootgarook Wetland was and is a high cultural significant site for the Boon Wurrung people
of the Kulin nation and today has high scientific values. A recent survey by Barker (2009)
found; “ten indigenous archaeological sites were located along the road reserve indicating
that traditional Boonwurrong owners camped along the margins of Tootgarook Wetland
located 400-800m west of Boneo Road.” According to Barker (2009); “The majority of
indigenous sites were located on sandy rises. These rises would have provided dry,
sheltered and well-drained camp sites from which to access the rich resources of the
adjacent Tootgarook Wetland, its associated watercourses and interdunal swamps.”
“The diversity of the stone technology in the assemblages suggested that the sites were
general purpose campsites. They were also situated near water sources on sandy welldrained soils. The Tootgarook Wetland and the interdunal wetlands provided a valuable
resource for Aboriginal people to exploit. Not only would they have presented people with
fresh water and food in the form of shellfish, reptiles and waterfowl, but it also would have
been an attraction for larger marsupials. The lower-lying flood plains would also have
provided ample plant foods within close foraging distance.”
18
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
In 1906, George Gordon McCrae wrote two letters to a local schoolmaster at Dromana, Mr
G.H. Rogers. His subject was his earliest recollections of an idyllic boyhood spent at Arthur’s
Seat Run, location of the historic McCrae Homestead on the coast of the southern shores of
the bay (located within the Mornington Peninsula Shire). In the letter he described in detail
the natural history of the area during the 1840s, and the species he particularly
remembered 60 years later. His recollection quotes on the swamp’s flora and fauna
included: “In the swamps (which have since been altered) were the Nankeen bird with one
long white feather behind the ear, the rail, the bittern, the snipe & jack snipe, several ducks
(including wood duck, black duck & teal), spoonbill, Black Swan, geese (most probably
Magpie and Cape Barron Geese), cranes, blue & white coots, water hens, kingfishers here &
there and swamp or ground parrot with the barred tail feathers (possibly the endangered &
FFG listed Ground Parrot, which is now extinct on the Mornington Peninsula).”
In the scrub by the waterholes were “honey eaters, warblers, red coat robins, emu-wren
with 2 long feathers in tail, laughing jack ass- everywhere (Laughing Kookaburra), butcher
bird, also known as shrike or whistling jackass, quail where coverage was good in the
bottom of scrub, turkey at Boneo (probably the Australian Bustard which is now extinct in
southern Victoria) and at the big swamp off the property”. “Birds of prey were everywhere
with eagle hawks, falcons, and owls, some white and of great size” (White-bellied SeaEagle).
Once European settlement occurred the Tootgarook Wetland was to endure a great many
changes many of them negative. Even so, it wasn’t long before the European’s discovered
some of the wetlands unique values. Aside from the good hunting, excellent drinking
waters from bore sinking, limestone and wood for building, the wetland also had some
other interesting facets.
In the mid to late 1800’s and early 1900’s the current Chinaman’s Creek route and lower
Drum Drum Alloc Creek channel drains were constructed through the wetland in order to
drain it for agricultural and extraction uses.
Once covering around 1500 hectares, today the remaining wetland covers around 450
hectares (Condina, 1997) and is designated by DEPI as a biosite of state significance. The
study area supports biodiversity and habitat occupied by fauna of international (migratory
birds), national, state, regional and local significance. Population densities of existing fauna
species on private and public land are increasing and associated with targeted
environmental management including: feral predator control programs, weed management
and native vegetation off setting.
19
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
2.0
METHODS
2.1 Existing information
2.1.1 Desktop Assessment
The following resources and databases were reviewed as part of the desktop assessment:
x
DSE’s Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna 2013
x
EPBC Act Protected Matters Search Tool (DEWHA 2010.
Previous fauna surveys of Tootgarook Wetland (refer to map 2 below for locations of
Tootgarook Wetland reserves and properties which have had fauna surveys previously
conducted) were reviewed and include:
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Mornington Peninsula Wildlife Atlas (Browns Road, Truemans Road, proposed
freeway reserve), (Legg M. 2007 to 2011)
Swamp Skink survey and habitat mapping at 220 Browns Road, Boneo, (Legg. M
2009)
Swamp Skink survey at Limestone Road, Lower Drum Drum Alloc Creek and a small
reserve off 40 Colchester Road (Legg. M, 2006)
Fauna survey of Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve, Rosebud West (Legg. M, 2006)
Fauna survey of Tootgarook Swamp Reserve, Boneo (Legg. M, 2006)
White-footed Dunnart survey at Tootgarook Swamp Reserve and Sanctuary Park
Bushland Reserve, Rosebud West, (Legg. M September 2006).
Flora and Fauna Assessment of 92 Elizabeth Ave Rosebud West (Practical Ecology
and Legg M. 2006)
Fauna Survey of 220 Browns Rd, Boneo (McNaught) (Legg. M, 2004)
Fauna Survey of Tootgarook Wetlands and Tern Ave, Rosebud West, (Legg. M, 2003)
Fauna Survey of Tootgarook Swamp Reserve, Boneo, (Legg. M, November 2003)
Fauna survey for Chinaman’s Creek (from Tootgarook Swamp to the mouth. And
Drum Drum Alloc Creek from Boneo Road to Tootgarook Swamp (Legg. M February
2002).
VICROADS Point Nepean Rd Congestion Study Biodiversity Desktop Assessment
(Biosis, 2012)
20
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Map 2: Locations of the previous fauna surveys conducted within
Tootgarook Wetlands from 2003 to 2013
8
8
7
7
6
5
3
6
1
1
4
3
4
4
KEY
Public land
1- Drum Drum Alloc Creek &
Colchester Road
2- Tootgarook Swamp Reserve
5- Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
7- Tern Avenue and Tootgarook Wetlands
8- Chinaman’s Creek
Roadsides
1- Limestone Road
3- Freeway Reserve & Browns Road
Private properties
4- 220 Browns Road
6- 92 Elizabeth Avenue
3
3
2
1
21
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
2.2 Fauna survey techniques
Fauna surveys were deployed using the following methods.
x
Decapod Crustaceans were sampled by sight and bait traps
x
Fish were sampled in dip nets and by deploying bait traps
x
Amphibians were identified by listening to male vocal call during day and
spotlight walks.
x
Reptiles were sampled by deploying Elliot traps, random searching and
turning over logs and rubbish.
x
Birds were visually detected by day and during spotlight walks and some
species were recorded on Scout-guard cameras. Population densities were
recorded for each species during each month of the survey period.
x
Mammals were identified on Scout-guard cameras, by deploying Elliot traps,
examining diggings, foot prints & scats and during spotlight walks & day
walks.
x
Nocturnal fauna were identified whilst conducting spotlight walks.
x
During spotlight walks microbats were recorded on the Anabat Bat 2 detector
and downloaded onto computers using specialized soft-ware.
2.2.1 Further detail of some of the fauna survey techniques listed above
includes:
Further details of the fauna survey techniques used during this fauna assessment are
described in Appendix 11 of this report.
2.2.2
Rapid assessment tool for analyzing the health of natural ecosystems
by assessing Fauna Environmental Indictor Species (FEIS’S) within
Broad Vegetation Types (BVT’s) found within the study sites.
Different extinction levels are occurring on each allotment of remaining remnant native
vegetation through-out the Mornington Peninsula, Westernport catchment and the bioregion. This is based on the extinction rate of fauna species (in the past and at present)
within remaining bush land sites.
22
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The author has determined which FEIS’s fit into each Broad Vegetation Type that still exists
within Mornington Peninsula and around Westernport catchment and is listed in Appendix
12 of this report. Results and discussions on the fauna found at each site, including
discussion on habitat and fauna species recorded, tables, fauna lists and discussions on
feral species are found in sections three and Appendices 1-12 of this report. A score is also
given to each site at a rating from one to five (which relates to the extinction phase the site
is currently experiencing) depending on loss of FEIS’s.
2.3
Limitations
The fauna surveys were conducted during mid spring, summer and autumn which only
detected the species that were present during those periods of time. Surveys conducted
over a 12 month period would achieve a higher species list and would detect all possible
vertebrate fauna species that exist within the study sites.
2.4
Research permit
All fauna sampling within the study sites was carried out legally under Wildlife Act
1975/FFG Act 1988 Research Permit Number 10005998.
2.5
Data handling and storage
Listings of all taxa detected throughout the survey within the study sites have been
submitted to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, Nicholson Street and
recorded on the Atlas of Victoria Wildlife for future reference. They have also been
submitted on the Mornington Peninsula Shire Wildlife Atlas.
2.6
Mapping
Geographical positioning data collection in the field for the purposes of map display was
carried out with an iPAQ Navigation System programmed into a HP iPAQ pocket PC using
Arcpad 9 software for mapping each fauna species detected within the study sites.
Mornington Peninsula Shire provided aerial maps of the targeted survey sites.
23
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.0 RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS
3.1 South-west corner of 3 Dutton Street, Rosebud West
3. 1.1
Study site
The study site is located in an industrial subdivision known as 3 Dutton Street in the parish
of Rosebud West. The site is also part of the greater Rosebud West industrial estate and is
located within the eastern part of Tootgarook Wetland. The site is less than one hectare in
size and its location is Melways reference number 169 K7. The site comprises swamp scrub,
wetlands and reed beds.
3.1.2
Ecological Vegetation Classes
Three Ecological Vegetation classes (EVC’s) are present within the site and includes EVC’s
(53) Freshwater Swamp Scrub, (656) Brackish Wetland and (821) Tall Marsh. Other EVC’s are
probably apparent but have not been mapped at present. The small number of EVC’s
constitutes different habitats which provide homes for a medium diversity of fauna species.
Majority of the EVC’s are of reasonable quality and some habitat changing weed species are
invading from the edges in. The EVC’s determined within the site and their status is
displayed in the table below.
Table 1: EVC’s present within 3 Dutton Street.
EVC No
EVC’s
Status within Gippsland
Plain Bioregion
053
656
821
Freshwater Swamp Scrub
Brackish Wetland
Tall Marsh
Endangered
Rare
No listing
3.1.3
Fauna detected within the study site
A total of 77 species of fauna were recorded during this survey within the study site and
adjacent land which will be developed under the shire subdivision permit. Of these, 68
species are native and nine species are introduced. These consist of one species of
Decapod Crustacean, no species of fish, six species of amphibians, ten species of reptiles
(of which one species is a tortoise, seven species are lizards and two species are snakes), 47
species of birds (of these 42 are native species and five species are introduced) and 13
species of mammals of which four species are introduced.
24
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.1.4
Results of field work conducted within the study site during this
survey (including Elliot traps, scat analysis, bird population
survey, spotlighting, bat detection, Scout-guard cameras and
FEIS Assessments).
3.1.4.1
Bird species and population density survey results
TABLE 2: Bird species and population densities detected for each month within 3 Dutton Street,
October 2013 to May 2014. ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Stubble Quail
Australian Pelican
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Purple Swamphen
Nankeen Night Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Masked Lapwing
Black-shouldered Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike-thrush
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Richard’s Pipit
*Skylark
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
*European Goldfinch
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
Oct
2013
Nov
2
2B
2B
3
4B
2B
10+
6
4
5
11
4
2
1
2
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
2
2
2
Mar
Apr
May
16
9
2
2
2
2
2
2
6
4
4
5
3
4
4
2
10+
20+
5
3
10+
10+
20+
6
20+
20+
4
4
20+
10+
20+
20+
6
5
6
4
2
2
6
2
4
4
5
6
6
2
4
6
6
5
3
2
5
2
4
4
5
4
7
3
10+
10+
30+
4
4
30+
10+
4
6
20+
2B
2B
2
2B
2
10+
10+
6
2
10+
20+
6
20+
10+
4
2
20+
8
4
2
2
2
1
2
3
4
2B
4B
2B
30+B
30+B
30+B
20+
30+B
10+
30+
30+B
20+B
30+B
20+B
30+B
20+B
30+B
20+B
30+
20+
4
20+
20+
10+
10+
5+
4
4
2
8B
10B
10B
6
6
4B
4B
4B
4B
4B
4B
2
4B
6
4B
2
4B
2
4B
4
4
4B
4
4
4
2
4
6
3
4
4
4
3
6
10+
10+B
2B
10+B
10+B
6B
20+B
10+B
10+B
6B
10+B
10+B
6B
20+B
10+B
4
10+B
6B
10+B
10+B
10+B
20+B
10+B
6
6B
10+B
20B
10+B
20+
8
6
4
10+
6
6
6
4
10+
50+
6
20+
50+
30+
6
10+
40+
6
25
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.1.4.2
Elliot trap survey results
TABLE 3: Fauna sampled in Elliot traps deployed through-out 3 Dutton Street, November to
December 2013.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Skink
30-11-13
02-12-13
28-11-13
29-11-13
30-11-13
01-12-13
02-12-13
01-12-13
02-12-13
1m
1f
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
Swamp Rat
*Black Rat
3.1.4.3
Area detected
Transect 2, trap 12.
Transect 2, trap 14.
Transect 1, traps 7, 10 & 12.
Transect 1, traps 7 & 10.
Transect 1, trap 7.
Transect 1, trap 13.
Transect 1, trap 12.
Transect 1, trap 6.
Transect 2, trap 2.
Feral predator scat analysis
TABLE 4: Faunal remains and mammal hairs identified in fox and cat scats collected through-out the
3 Dutton Street, October 2013 to April 2014.
Predator Species
scat
Date collected
Non mammal remains
Mammal hairs analyzed within scat
*Fox 1
*Fox 2
*Fox 3
*Fox 4
*Feral Cat 1
*Feral Cat 2
20-11-13
12-12-13
18-02-14
09-04-14
18-02-14
17-04-14
Nil
Feathers
Insects and berries
Insects and berries
Feathers & reptile scales
Feathers
Swamp Rat
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil.
Nil.
3.1.4.4
Spotlight walk results
TABLE 5: Fauna observed during spotlighting throughout 3 Dutton Street, December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
Amphibians
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Spotted Marsh Frog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
50+
20+
20+
10+
10+
20+
20+
2
4
20+
20+
10+
20+
10+
5+
Wet areas.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
26
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Birds
Lewin’s Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Masked Lapwing
Mammals
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Bat sps
*Fox
*Feral Cat
3.1.4.5
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
14-04-14
18-12-13
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
2
2
6
4
4
Blackberries opposite scrub.
Scrub patch.
Open areas.
As above.
As above.
18-12-13
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
1
5+
8
3
2
3
3 sps.
4 sps.
3 sps.
1
1
2
2
1
Scrub patch.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Flying over scrub.
As above.
As above.
Through-out.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
TABLE 6: Micro bats recorded on the Anabat II Bat Detector through-out 3 Dutton Street, December 2013
to March 2014.
Species
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Little Forest Bat
3.1.4.6
Date
Number
recorded
Site detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
11
24
5
18
15
14
6
21
28
7
Flying through-out.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Scout-guard camera deployment
Two Scout-guard cameras were deployed within the swamp scrub patch of the study site
and were deployed from 22-11-13 until the 20-12-13. Below in the graph are the results
recorded from this deployment.
27
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Graph 1 Results of Scout-guard camera deployment within 3 Dutton Street, 22-11 to 20-12-13
60
50
40
Black Wallaby
30
*Red Fox
Grey Fantail
20
Nothing
10
0
Camera 1
3.1.4.7
Camera 2
Current status of Broad Vegetation Class ecosystems within the
study site using FEIS rapid assessment tool
After accessing the site using the FEIS rapid assessment tool, the tables below list the FEIS’s
that still occur and the species which have disappeared within Broad Vegetation Classes
across the site. A score is also given at a rating from 1 to 5 (which relates to which
extinction phase the site is currently experiencing) depending on loss of FEIS’s.
Table 7: FEIS assessment of scrub (wet) within 3 Dutton Street.
Decapod Crustaceans,
Amphibians and
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
Engaeus sps
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Southern Water Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Brush Bronzewing
Eastern Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Southern Emu-wren
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Rufous Fantail
Grey Currawong
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
Dusky Antechinus
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
16 of the 33 FEIS’s
have disappeared from
the site.
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have
disappeared from the site
based on this survey.
48% of FEIS’s still
remain which indicates
a phase 3 extinction
rate within the Scrub
through-out the site.
28
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 8: FEIS Assessment of BVT, Wetlands & Swamps within 3 Dutton Street.
Decapod
Amphibians
Reptiles
Birds
Crustaceans
& Fish
Engaeus sp
Spotted Galaxias
Dwarf Galaxias
KEY
Red writing
indicates species
that have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the site.
based on this
survey
3.1.5
3.1.5.1
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Growling Grass Frog
Common Longnecked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Ballions Crake
Spotless Crake
Australasian Bittern
Nankeen Night Heron
Great Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Southern Emu-wren
White-fronted Chat
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Swamp Rat
14 of the 26
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from the
wetlands and
swamps within
the site.
46% of FEIS’s
still remain
which indicates
a phase 3
extinction rate
within the
wetlands
through-out the
site.
Significant fauna detected at 3 Dutton Street
Significant fauna detected throughout the study site during this survey.
Nationally significant species listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act
1999 were not detected during this survey. However one species is listed as internationally
migratory under the EPBC Act. Seven State significant species were recorded during this
study and two of those species are listed under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 as
threatened. In addition, a further 13 species recorded are considered to be of regional
significance and four species recorded are considered to be of high local significance. The
remaining native fauna utilizing the study site are considered to be at a local significance
level due to large population and habitat losses within the local area (Mornington Peninsula
Shire).
3.1.5.2
Ecological significance of the study site.
This site supports old-growth Freshwater Swamp Scrub with high levels of intactness of the
understorey and canopy, both of which today are very rare in the greater Tootgarook
Wetland. However a significant risk to the conservation values to this site is being caused by
invasion of habitat changing weeds around the perimeter of the site derived from dumped
spoil and waste on the adjoining industrial zoned land. If current weed invasion to this site
is not managed then the high habitat values and fauna species diversity and population
densities will likely to seriously decline. The existing planning permit and storm water
management proposes to discharge surface flows onto this site. The discharge of storm
29
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
water surface flows will be likely to severely degrade the vegetation quality and adversely
alter the vegetation composition. The survey has revealed that this site contains:x
Mature endangered EVC Freshwater Swamp Scrub and other communities which
should be protected from the development and use of industrial zoned land.
x
The southern most extreme occurrence of the Spotted Marsh Frog on the Mornington
Peninsula. Through-out the entire Tootgarook Wetland this species is only found in
this industrial subdivision on this site and the nearby Melbourne Water retarding
basin.
x
This site also provides significant habitat refuge for a high number of fauna species
including threatened species, considering its small size >1 hectare.
Opportunities should be sought to rezone this site to protect its high conservation values
into the future.
On the basis of presence of significant flora & fauna species, associated habitat and
endangered EVC’s, this site along with the other sites within this survey are considered to be
of state ecological significance.
3.1.5.3
Habitat significance
The vegetation communities within the site contain important habitat for fauna species. The
indigenous swamp scrub communities support a medium diversity of arboreal mammals and
avifauna, whereas the ground vegetation supports a medium to high diversity of terrestrial
fauna and scrub-dwelling avifauna. Wetland flora communities also support threatened bird
and reptile species. Some feral species (such-as *Feral Cats, *Red Foxes and *Black Rat) are
threatening some of the fauna diversity within the site and are currently being controlled
within the surrounding area.
3.1.5.4
Defining significant species
Fauna in the site were classed according to their high local, regional and State significant
levels. As lists of regionally and locally significant fauna aren’t available from relevant
government authorities, those significant taxa were assessed by the author from his
previous records within the bioregion and Mornington Peninsula Shire.
Key to defining significant species
Signif
N
S
R
HL
Significant/status of species is designated by:
National
State
Regional
High Local
30
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
DSE
FFG
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Cen
End
Vul
LR
NT
DD
Ls
M
Un
MC
LC
C
Lim
Advisory list of threatened Vertebrate in Victoria-2013 (DSE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guaranteed Act 1988
Action Plan approved by Environmental Australia
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
International Treaties, C=China (CAMBA) and J=Japan (JAMBA).
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
lower risk-near threatened
Near Threatened
data deficient
Listed
Migratory under the EPBC Act
Uncommon
Moderately Common
Locally Common
Common
Limited
TABLE 9: Significant fauna detected throughout the 3 Dutton Street during this survey.
Common Name
Amphibians
Southern Toadlet
Reptiles
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Musk Lorikeet
White-throated Needletail
Crescent Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
Black Wallaby
Micro bats occurring throughout.
Swamp Rat
Scientific Name
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Sig
DSE.
S
Vul
Chelodina longicollis
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellina
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Australeps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
S
S
R
R
S
R
R
HL
R
DD
Vul
MC
MC
Vul
MC
MC
C
Un
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Nycticorax caledonicus hillii
Aquila audax
Circus approximans
Glossopsitta concinna
Hirundapus caudacutus
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Eopsaltria australis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
R
S
S
HL
HL
HL
S
R
R
R
Un
Vul
LR
Un
MC
MC
Vul
MC
Un
Un
Tachyglossus aculeatus
Wallabia bicolor
Tadarida, Chalinolobus &
Vespadelus sps.
Rattus lutreolus
R
R
R
C
MC
C
R
C
FFG.
ActPl
Ls
Yes
Ls
Yes
EPBC
M
Map 3 below shows the locations of state threatened fauna species which were identified
within the site during this survey. Please note that small flocks of internationally migratory
White-throated Needletail were not recorded as landing within the reserve and so are not
recorded on map 3.
31
TR
CJ
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
This picture shows important Swamp Skink, Glossy Grass Skink, rail and crake habitat within a Swamp Scrub patch at 3 Dutton Street.
Photo M. Legg 2014.
This picture shows a Common long-necked Tortoise which was found in a Swamp Scrub patch at 3 Dutton Street. Photo M. Legg 2014
32
KEY
Study site boundaries
Southern Toadlet
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Locations of state significant fauna species within 3 Dutton
Street
Map 3
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
33
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.1.6
Discussion
3.1.6.1
Indigenous Fauna
3.1.6.1.1
Decapod Crustacean
One species of Decapod Crustacean was identified within the swamp scrub community
where typical mud chimneys were observed in the wetter areas (see photo below). Colonies
of burrowing crayfish are excellent environmental health indicators of the water table below
the surface.
Typical chimney construction at the entrance of this Engaeus species burrow located at 3 Dutton Street. Photo M. Legg 2014.
3.1.6.1.2
Amphibians
Reasonable population densities of Common Froglet, Southern Bullfrog, Spotted Marsh Frog,
Verreaux’s Tree Frog and Southern Brown Tree Frog were found to inhabit the inundated
sites trough-out, especially in EVC Tall Marsh and along the edges of EVC Freshwater
Swamp Scrub. During spring and autumn the above species were heard calling from the
described vegetation either within or around the edges of the water bodies that exist. At
these sites they mated and spawned within. The occasion Southern Bullfrog and Spotted
34
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Marsh Frog were found under dumped rubbish or observe jumping through vegetation
during spotlight walks.
During mid autumn smaller populations of state threatened Southern Toadlet were heard
calling from low-lying areas that become inundated during winter. Several of these species
are under threat from the proposed sub-division of the property and the possible
construction of a retarding basin. Changed or altered drainage patterns to this threatened
species habitat can cause populations to become extinct.
Rarer species which weren’t sampled during this survey and are probably extinct within the
area include: Victorian Smooth Froglet, Stripped Marsh Frog and Growling Grass Frog. It is
unlikely that future surveys within the greater area would identify these species.
Spotted Marsh Frog photographed at 3 Dutton Street. Photo M. Legg February 2014.
3.1.6.1.3
Reptiles
Reptile species and population densities appeared to be at a reasonably high diversity and
density level within the site. This is due to reasonably high quality habitat with intact
understories consisting either indigenous or of exotic grasses and sedges. Very few
terrestrial logs were present with some fallen paperbark trunks (with small hollows)
providing homes for some skink species. Some habitat changing weed species are present
35
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
and posing some impacts upon available essential understorey habitat. The reptiles
identified during this survey period and their habitats are discussed below.
Reptiles identified within the site include tortoises, lizards and snakes. One Common Longnecked Tortoise was observed swimming in flooded sections of the swamp scrub area and
possibly bred within. Two FFG listed Swamp Skinks, were sampled in Elliot traps and another
individual was observed sunning itself on the edge of a grass tussock. Swamp Skinks within
the site appear to be at low density levels and would probably increase if terrestrial logs
with small hollows were deployed. The state threatened Glossy Grass Skink was observed
under fallen debris and occasionally under dumped tin. Populations appear to be at a low
density level, similar to the Swamp Skink. Other small skinks observed included: Garden
Skink, Metallic Skink, Southern Grass Skink and Weasel Skink. All were observed either in the
understorey or found under dumped rubbish. One Blotched Blue-tongue was observed in
grasses on the edge of the swamp scrub area and the low population levels within are
breeding residents. Two snake species were observed during the survey period and include:
Lowland Copperhead and White-lipped Snake. Both species were found under dumped
rubbish and the population densities appear to be at a low level.
3.1.6.1.4
Birds
A medium diversity of birds inhabits the various habitats found through-out the site and
can be divided into three categories:
x
wetland birds
x
woodland birds
x
Introduced birds
Wetland birds
During this survey the wetland bird species identified throughout the site were mainly
observed flying overhead or found to inhabit the various vegetation structures within.
Wetland birds identified flying overhead include: Australian Pelican, Australian White Ibis,
Straw-necked Ibis and Masked Lapwing. The Masked Lapwing is the only breeding resident
on surrounding cleared land.
Residential and breeding wetland bird species include: Buff-banded Rail, FFG listed Lewin’s
Rail, Purple Swamphen and Nankeen Night Heron. Both rail species were regularly observed
either calling or foraging and possibly breeding within *English Blackberry patches adjacent
to the swamp scrub. A pair of Purple Swamphens moved into the site during April 2014 and
hopefully will take up residency. During December 2013 a pair of the state threatened
36
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Nankeen Night Heron were observed feeding in the swamp scrub patch where inundated
sites occurred.
Masked Lapwing photographed in cleared land adjacent to 3 Dutton Street. Photo M. Legg November 2013.
Future habitat restoration projects and the removal of habitat changing weeds such-as
blackberry should be staged over a few years in order for both rail species to be able to
adapt and adjust. Weed species should be replaced with indigenous grasses, sedges and
prickly bushes.
Woodland birds
Several species of woodland birds were found to inhabit the swamp scrub patch, reeds and
understorey habitats found through-out the site and are discussed below.
A large flock of Stubble Quail visited the property during mid April and were observed
feeding on seed through-out.
Birds of prey were regularly observed flying over the site and surrounding vegetation, while
hunting for food or performing courtship displays. They include: Black-shouldered Kite,
Wedge-tailed Eagle and Swamp Harrier which are not breeding residents but bred nearby.
Occasionally small flocks of Galahs, Cockatoos, Rainbow Lorikeets and Musk Lorikeets were
observed flying overhead but didn’t land within the site.
37
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Migratory birds within Australasia arrived at the site during spring & autumn and include
Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo, Grey Fantail, Welcome Swallow, Clamorous Reed Warbler and
Silvereye. Majority of the species mentioned above bred within the site and left for northern
or eastern Australia during autumn (post breeding). After breeding the Silvereye migrated
from Tasmania back to the mainland especially to the Mornington Peninsula Shire where
increase population densities were observed during late summer and autumn. The cuckoos
are parasitic and lay their eggs in the nests of honeyeaters, finches, wrens and thornbills
and migrate to New Guinea after breeding.
Small flocks of the state threatened White-throated Needletail were observed flying
overhead and feeding on insects during summer months. They breed in Korea and migrate
to Australia during summer where they can be observed in aerial flight feeding on insects
usually in front of summer storms.
Superb Fairy-wren, White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill are common permanent
breeding residents of thickets, undergrowth and canopies within the site.
A small flock of Spotted Pardalote visited the site during April and was observed foraging on
canopies.
Five species of honeyeaters were recorded throughout the site, mainly within the swamp
scrub areas. These include the Red Wattlebird, Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater, Yellow-faced
Honeyeater, Crescent Honeyeater and New Holland Honeyeater. The Crescent Honeyeater
appears to be the only breeding resident within the site while the other four species visited
the site to forage on blossoms and hunt insects.
The Eastern Yellow Robin and Grey Shrike Thrush are rare breeding resident within the site
and can often be heard calling or observed feeding on insects.
Common open country birds such-as Willy Wagtail, Magpie-lark, Grey Butcherbird,
Australian Magpie, Australian Raven and Little Raven are common to rare breeding residents
or visitors to the site.
Occasional Richard’s Pipit was observed in grassy areas but didn’t breed while Goldenheaded Cisticola and Little Grassbird are breeding residents of grassy and reed bed sites.
Introduced Birds
Five species of introduced birds inhabit the site and include: *Skylark, *European Goldfinch,
*Common Blackbird, *Common Starling and *Common Myna. The *Skylark, *European
38
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Goldfinch and *Common Blackbird are breeding residents while the *Common Starling and
*Common Myna are foraging visitors.
Large flocks of starlings were observed during autumn feeding on blackberry fruit. The
*Common Blackbird and *Common Starling are prolific spreaders of noxious and
environmental weed seed.
3.1.6.1.4.1
Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
Results from the graph below indicate that bird species diversity within the site was the
lowest (22) during February and peaked at 35 species during April and May. This can be
attributed to post breeding period when bird species tend to move around from breeding
site to other habitat patches adjacent or within the greater area. The table below lists the
fluctuations in bird species diversity within the site, during each month of the survey period.
Graph 2: Fluctuations in bird species diversity within 3 Dutton Street over an 8 month period during this
survey period.
40
35
30
25
20
No of bird species present
per month
15
10
5
0
Oct
3.1.6.1.5
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Mammals
A low diversity of mammal species was recorded within the site, while other species that
should occur were found to be absent. Absent species include: White-footed Dunnart, Longnosed Bandicoot, Southern Brown Bandicoot, Eastern Grey Kangaroo and Water Rat. Some of
these species were known to occur within the area over the last three decades. The
mammals recorded during this survey are discussed below.
39
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Monotremes
The occasional Short-beaked Echidna digging was encountered throughout the site during
the survey period and is probably a solitary specimen which has made its way to the site
from surrounding areas. Echidnas are breeding residents within the greater area whom
utilize most habitats that contain a year-round supply of sought-after termites and ants.
Marsupials
Nocturnal possums include the Common Brushtail Possum and Common Ringtail Possum
which were observed during spotlight walks conducted through-out the site. Only one
brushtail possum was found while several ringtail possums were observed in the swamp
scrub canopies. Here they were observed either feeding in the swamp scrub canopy or
calling when disturbed. Juveniles of ringtail possums were observed in summer and autumn.
Within the swamp scrub canopy dreys are constructed which are used as homes.
Two or three Black Wallabies were often encountered during spotlight walks and were filmed
on Scout-guard cameras. Scats were also encountered during field work.
Placental Mammals
Three nights of recording micro-bat echolocation calls were conducted throughout this
survey. Micro-bats were seen on warm nights flying past the light beam of a torch, catching
and eating insects while in flight. Future micro-bat recordings could result in further species
identification, as some species are common one month and then absent the next. All
species of micro-bats that occur within the site are hollow dependent, nocturnal, and eat
three times their body weight in insects each night. Most species are feeding visitors to the
site and roost or breed elsewhere.
The Swamp Rat population appears to be at a stable level and was regularly sampled in Elliot
traps. They occupy areas of the site which don’t become inundated with water and have a
dense understorey of various graminoids, either indigenous or introduce grasses.
Underneath this vegetation they excavate runways and build nest chambers at the end in
burrows up to one meter long. These are apparent throughout their distribution within the
site. They feed on a variety of rhizomes, seeds and other various vegetation matters from
the local graminoids. Breeding occurs from spring to autumn and three weeks after
gestation three to five naked young are born in the nest. Three to four weeks later they
leave the nest as independent individuals. Mature females may have several litters
throughout the season (Menkhorst 1995).
40
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
This Swamp Rat was sampled in an Elliot trap adjacent to the Swamp Scrub patch at 3 Dutton Street. Photo M. Legg November 2013.
3.1.6.1.6
Feral mammals
Introduced rodents
*House Mice were found under dumped rubbish and none were sampled in Elliot traps. They
probably impact on fauna in various ways, spreading parasites and disease to small
mammals and displacing other fauna. They also provide a food source for raptors and
snakes.
*Black Rats appear to be uncommon through-out most habitats and an occasional specimen
was observed or sampled in Elliot traps. *Black Rats impact on fauna in various ways,
spreading parasites and disease to small mammals and displacing hollow-dependant and
hollow-breeding fauna. They probably take a large proportion of essential food items which
are essential for the survival of threatened mammal species. *Black Rats are also known to
eat and kill the state threatened Swamp Skink, other small lizards and other reptiles while in
a state of torpa.
*European Rabbit
No *European Rabbits were found to occur within the site or surrounding area.
*Feral Cat and *Red Fox
*Feral Cats and the *Red Fox appear to be low in population densities and occasional scats
from both species were collected. Food matter and mammal hairs within the scats were
analyzed to record their prey source. The low population densities can be attributed to the
41
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
on-going Mornington Peninsula feral predator control programs which are deployed around
the greater Tootgarook Wetland.
Pre Mornington Peninsula Shire feral control programs through-out the greater wetland
probably saw high predation of fauna species. Post feral control programs have probably
seen an increase in some fauna population densities. On-going and integrated *Red Fox &
*Feral Cat control programs must continue through-out the greater wetland and include the
site in order to maintain important terrestrial fauna species and their population densities.
3.1.6.2
Habitat changing weeds
Some habitat changing weed species are present within the site and are changing some
aspects of critical fauna habitat that remains. Most infestations are occurring around the
edges of EVC’s while others have penetrated within. The most serious infestations include:
*Box Thorn, *Kikuyu, *English Blackberry, a fig species, *Spear Thistle and weedy grasses
etc. Majority of the habitat changing weeds have the potential to take over causing large
changes and destruction of essential habitats. Consequently a large reduction in fauna
population densities and species diversity will occur.
Weed species are also providing habitat for some fauna species such-as rails, wrens and
skinks etc and should only be removed over an extended period of time. Weeds being used
as habitat by fauna species must also be replaced with indigenous terrestrial plants such-as
grasses, sedges and prickly shrubs.
This large patch of blackberry at 3 Dutton Street is home to two species of rail and needs to be
removed over a few years. Photo M. Legg 2014.
42
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
*Kikuyu and *Box Thorn are invading this swamp scrub patch from the edges in at 3 Dutton Street. Photos M. Legg 2014.
A *Fig species and *Spear Thistles have penetrated within the swamp scrub patch at 3 Dutton Street. Photos M. Legg 2014.
3.1.6.3
Relative importance of key habitats
The site is an important section of the north-east edge of Tootgarook Wetland that still
retains significant vegetation and habitat. The habitat supports breeding pairs of state and
regionally threatened rails and populations of FFG listed Swamp Skinks and Glossy Grass
Skink. The state threatened Southern Toadlet is also a breeding resident while the Nankeen
Night Heron utilizes the site as a foraging site. Such sites are extremely important for the
future survival of threatened species within Tootgarook Wetland.
The large patches of the EVC Tall Marsh (dominated by Common Reed) adjacent to the site
are also important breeding sites for both species of rail, Swamp Skink, Glossy Grass Skink
and the Clamorous Reed Warbler. During spring the Clamorous Reed Warbler migrates from
north-eastern Australia to Tootgarook Wetland to breed within the Tall Marsh EVC. In early
autumn they migrate back to north-eastern Australia.
The Tall Marsh through-out the property is potential habitat for the EPBC listed endangered
Australasian Bittern and needs full protection as described in the action and recovery plans
of this species.
43
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Large patches of blackberry adjacent to the swamp scrub patch are providing breeding and
foraging habitats for reptiles, rails and small bird species. Such weeds need to be removed
over five years and replaced with indigenous grasses, sedges and shrubs in order to provide
additional habitats.
The above picture shows the close proximity of the blackberry patch with the swamp scrub patch at 3 Dutton Street. Rails were observed
within the blackberries on several occasions and need to be replaced over a five year period. Photo M. Legg 2014
This dense reed patch at 3 Dutton Street provides homes to Swamp Skinks, rails, and Clamorous Reed Warbler. Photo M. Legg 2014.
44
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.1.6.4
Bio-links from the study site to surrounding vegetation
The site is relatively small but is still an important section of remaining habitat along the
north-eastern edge of Tootgarook Wetland which is a buffer between the wetland and the
industrial estate. Biolinks between this site and the retarding basin to the north must be
considered within future development of the adjacent property. This will allow adequate
movement of threatened fauna species such as rails and crakes. Such a link is important as
it will link the site to Drum Drum Alloc Creek which is an important wildlife biolink between
the wetland and the foothills to the east.
3.1.6.5
FEIS assessments
During this survey Broad Vegetation Types (BVT) scrub and wetlands & swamps were
assessed within the site using the FEIS rapid assessment tool. This is an assessment of
habitat specific fauna species that quickly disappear when their habitat changes at a rapid
rate. The assessments within the site indicated that 48% of FEIS‟s were present within scrub
and 46% within wetlands & swamps. This indicates a phase 3 extinction rate of FEIS’s within
both BVT’s assessed within the site.
Assessments indicted that large tree hollows are absent and terrestrial logs with small
hollows are mainly confined to the old-growth swamp scrub, where old trunks have fallen,
especially under or around mature stands. On-going and integrated feral control programs
need to continue across the landscape in order to maintain and increase fauna species
diversity and population densities within the Tootgarook Wetland.
3.1.6.6
Monitoring FEIS’s and population densities within the study site
A monitoring program within the site for certain FEIS species including threatened species
(found to be present) needs to be developed to measure fluctuations in population densities
and loss of species. Such species considered for monitoring are listed in tables 7 & 8 within
this section of the report.
45
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.1.7
Recommendations for 3 Dutton Street
The following management recommendations are set out to help the study site’s managers
to manage the fauna and habitat more appropriately in accordance with flora and fauna
requirements.
x
Continue to conduct fauna surveys every five years and carry out yearly
monitoring of FEIS’s, threatened indigenous fauna species and feral species
using Scout-guard cameras and analysing fox scats.
x
Protect the Freshwater Swamp Scrub patch and adjacent Tall Marsh from
development and the discharge of storm water off the industrial site
subdivision. The Tall Marsh through-out the property is potential habitat for
the nationally endangered Australasian Bittern and needs full protection as
described in the action and recovery plans for this species.
x
Opportunities should be sought to rezone the swamp scrub and Tall Marsh
sites to protect their high conservation values into the future.
x
Fully protect at this site the southern most extreme occurrence of the Spotted
Marsh Frog on the Mornington Peninsula.
x
Limit herbicide spraying in known Southern Toadlet habitat only spray in late
spring and summer when this species is hibernating.
x
Fully protect the significant habitat which is a refuge for a high number of
fauna species including threatened species.
x
Recommendations for fauna species contained in Action Plans and Recovery
Plans under the FFG Act 1988 be sought to be implemented within the
property.
x
In association with the construction of 3 Dutton Street subdivision a permit
should be required to be obtained under the Wildlife Act from DEPI for the
capture and relocation of state significant & other native fauna species
including but not limited to Southern Toadlet, Spotted Marsh Frog, Swamp
Skink & Glossy Grass Skink prior to and during subdivision construction
works. All capture and relocation of fauna species to be supervised by a fully
qualified and experienced zoologist.
x
Native fauna habitat at this site currently includes dumped hard waste which
acts as essential habitat. Prior to the removal of any hard waste a detailed
inspection is required to be conducted for the presence of native and
threatened fauna species and relocated in accordance with the Wildlife Act
46
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
permit conditions.
x
Existing occupied faunal habitat also includes exotic weeds such-as
blackberry thickets which are currently being utilized by threatened species
such-as Lewin’s Rail and Buff Banded Rail. During revegetation projects
remove blackberry patches adjacent to the swamp scrub patch over a staged
period and replace with prickly shrubs, grasses and sedges.
x
Vegetation offsets arising from the development of the subdivision should be
partially accommodated within this site.
x
Strong recommendation is made to the shire to require on the industrial lots
that adjoin the site to have a building setback along the northern and eastern
boundaries. This will assist the provision of a vegetated buffer to help insure
protection of the essential wetland habitat values of the site.
x
Given the significance and isolation of this site from other natural areas of
the wetlands a high priority should be given to creating actively managed
biolinks.
x
Include this site in the shire’s feral predator control programs of the greater
wetlands focusing on *Red Foxes, *Feral Cats and *Black Rats.
x
Through-out the raised sites and revegetation areas deploy terrestrial habitat
logs with small hollows.
x
Council develop and install signage at the entrance to the site interpreting
the environmental, cultural and hydro-geological functions of the land parcel.
x
Address key threats to habitat and bio-diversity.
Once this site is transferred over to the shire management actions should include the
following: During weeding programs follow these simple rules:
o
Conduct weeding in sections and span the process over five or so
years
o
Start from the good areas and work outwards and control invading
weeds on the edges.
o
Only remove woody weeds during the non-bird breeding season.
o
Leave if Eastern Yellow Robins or other birds are nesting.
o
If ringtail possum dreys or bird nests occur in weeds then ring-bark
with-out poisoning and follow-up after a year.
o
Allow natural regeneration to occur.
47
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.2 Melbourne Water Retarding Basin at 66 Henry Wilson Drive,
Rosebud West
3. 2.1
Study site
The site is located at the end of Henry Wilson Drive, in the parish of Rosebud West and
within the Mornington Peninsula Shire. It is also located on the eastern edge of Tootgarook
Swamp and on the western edge of the industrial estate. The site comprises mature
remnant native vegetation and a constructed retarding basin with indigenous plantings. It is
approximately one hectare in size and its location is Melways reference number 169 K7. The
site comprises swamp scrub, reed beds, wetland vegetation, retarding basin and grasslands.
Recent indigenous buffer plantings between the road and retarding basin have added
additional habitat for fauna species.
3.2.2
Ecological Vegetation Classes
Six Ecological Vegetation classes (EVC’s) are present within the reserve and includes EVC’s
(053) Freshwater Swamp Scrub, (132) South Gippsland Plains Grassland, (136) Sedge
Wetland, (653) Aquatic Herbland, (656) Brackish Wetland and (821) Tall Marsh. Other EVC’s
are probably apparent but have not been mapped at present. These EVC’s constitutes
different habitats which provide homes for a high diversity of fauna species. The majority of
the EVC’s are of medium to high quality with most weeds invading from the edges in and
along the adjacent Hiscock Road Reserve & Drum Drum Alloc Creek. The EVC’s determined
within the reserve and their status is displayed in the table below.
Table 10: EVC’s present within the retarding basin reserve.
EVC No
EVC’s
053
132
136
653
656
821
Freshwater Swamp Scrub
South Gippsland Plains Grassland
Sedge Wetland
Aquatic Herbland
Brackish Wetland
Tall Marsh
3.2.3
Status within Gippsland
Plain Bioregion
Endangered
Endangered
Vulnerable
Endangered
Rare
No listing
Fauna detected within the reserve
A total of 96 species of fauna were recorded within the site during this survey. Of these 86
species are native and ten species are introduced. These consist of one species of Decapod
Crustacean, three species of fish (of which one species is native and two species are
introduced), six species of amphibians, 12 species of reptiles (of which one species is a
48
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
tortoise, eight species are lizards and three species are snakes), 60 species of birds (of
these 55 are native species and five species are introduced) and 14 species of mammals of
which four species are introduced.
3.2.4
Results of field work conducted within the reserve during this survey
(including bait & Elliot trap surveys, scat analysis, bird population
surveys, spotlighting, bat detection, Scout-guard camera deployment,
FEIS Assessments and observations).
3.2.4.1
Fish sampling results
TABLE 11: Fish sampled in bait traps through-out the retarding basin reserve, December 2013 to
April 2014.
Species
Date
Burrowing Cray sps.
Short-finned Eel
*Tench
*Mosquitofish
12-12-13
12-12-13
17-02-14
12-12-13
17-02-14
3.2.4.2
Number
sampled
3
2
2
24
24
Area sampled
Within retarding basin.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Bird species and population density survey results
TABLE 12: Bird species and population densities detected for each month at the retarding basin reserve
October 2013 to May 2014. ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Stubble Quail
Australian Pelican
Pied Cormorant
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Australasian Grebe
Pacific Black Duck
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Ballion’s Crake
Purple Swamphen
Eurasian Coot
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Royal Spoonbill
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Masked Lapwing
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo
Barn Owl
Oct
2013
Nov
4
4
2
1
3
3
3
1
1
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
1
2
1
2
2
4
12
2
2
2
2
2
6
2
2
2
6
2
3
4
2
2
2
8
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
10+
20+
4B
1
2
1
10+
10+
4B
10+
10+
18
10+
10+
4
2
2
2
4
1B
May
7
1
1
2
6
10+
4B
1
2
Apr
4
6
6
6
4
6
6
4
6
2
3
16
10+
4
3
3
10+
8
3
2
4
10+
4
5
2B
1
49
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
SPECIES
Oct
2013
Tawny Frogmouth
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike-thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
*Skylark
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
*European Goldfinch
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
3.2.4.3
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
2
Feb
10+
2
10+
Mar
Apr
May
26B
30B
30+B
30+B
30+
30+
22B
24B
4B
30B
25B
4B
30+B
20+B
6B
2
30+B
20+B
6B
30+
20+
6
4
20+
19
6
4
2B
6B
4B
2B
2B
6B
4B
2B
2B
6B
4B
2B
2B
8
4B
4B
4
4
6
4
4
4
6
4
2
50+
10+
30+
20+
6
4
6
4
4
6
4
6B
6B
6B
6B
8
6B
6B
2
4
4
5
10+
6
4
2
4
3
11
3
10+
8
2
4
4
6
2
4
6
2
50+
10+
30+
20+
5
4
5
4
3
6
4
4
6
2
4
4
5
4
7
4
4B
6B
6
4
6
4
20+
4
10+
10+
3
20+
4
10+
10+
4B
4B
4
6
6B
2B
10+B
6B
4B
10+B
4B
6B
8B
6
10+B
4B
10+B
4B
10+B
4B
4
20+
20+B
4B
40+
6
20+
50+
2
20+
4
10+
30+
Elliot trap survey results
TABLE 13: Fauna sampled in Elliot traps deployed within the retarding basin reserve, November to
December 2013.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Skink
Swamp Rat
02-12-13
28-11-13
29-11-13
01-12-13
02-12-13
01-12-13
11-12-13
12-12-13
1m
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
*Black Rat
*House Mouse
Area detected
Transect 1, trap 3.
Transect 1, trap 5.
Transect 1, trap 5.
Transect 1, trap 15.
Transect 1, traps 5 % 6.
Transect 1, trap 2.
Transect 1, trap 11.
Transect 1, trap 4.
50
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.2.4.4
Feral predator scat analysis
TABLE 14: Remains found within fox & cat scats found at the retarding basin reserve, October 2013 to
March 2014.
Predator Species
scat
Date collected
Non mammal remains
Mammal hairs analyzed within scat
*Fox 1
*Fox 2
*Fox 4
*Cat 1
*Cat 2
28-11-13
22-12-13
17-04-14
28-11-13
02-02-14
Nil
Nil
Insects and berries
Feathers
Feathers
*Black Rat.
*Swamp Rat.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
3.2.4.5
Spotlight walk results
TABLE 15: Fauna observed during spotlighting throughout the retarding basin reserve, December 2013
to April 2014.
Species
Amphibians
Common Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Southern Bullfrog
Spotted Marsh Frog
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Birds
Lewin’s Rail
Purple Swamphen
Nankeen Night Heron
Masked Lapwing
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Mammals
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Bat sps
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
50+
20+
20+
3
20+
10+
50+
30+
20+
20+
10+
20+
10+
5+
Retarding basin.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
3
2
2
1
4
4
6
1
2
2
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Open areas.
As above.
As above.
Scrub
As above.
As above.
18-12-13
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
1
8
7
4
1
2
1
4sps
Scrub.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
51
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
Bat sps.
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
5 sps
3 sps
1
1
1
2
1
1
As above.
As above.
Open areas.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
*Fox
*Feral Cat
3.2.4.6
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
TABLE 16: Micro bats recorded on the Anabat II Bat Detector through-out the retarding basin reserve,
December 2013 to March 2014.
Species
Date
Number
Area detected
detected
White-striped Free-tail Bat
18-12-13
13
Flying above the reserve.
13-02-14
18
As above.
14-04-14
8
As above.
Gould’s Wattled Bat
18-12-13
28
As above.
13-02-14
26
As above.
14-04-14
18
As above.
Lesser Long-eared Bat
18-12-13
6
As above.
Large Forest Bat
18-12-13
4
As above.
Little Forest Bat
18-12-13
33
As above.
13-02-14
28
As above
14-04-14
21
As above.
3.2.4.7
Scout-guard camera deployment
Scout-guard cameras were deployed on the 22-11-13 but were stolen a week later. No new
cameras were deployed as the change of theft again was high.
3.2.4.8
Current status of Broad Vegetation Class ecosystems within the
reserve using FEIS rapid assessment tool
After accessing the reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool, the tables below list the
FEIS’s that still occur and the species which have disappeared within Broad Vegetation
Classes across the site. A score is also given at a rating from 1 to 5 (which relates to which
extinction phase the site is currently experiencing) depending on loss of FEIS’s.
52
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 17: FEIS assessment of scrub (wet) within the retarding basin reserve.
Decapod Crustaceans,
Amphibians and
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
Engaeus sps
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Southern Water Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Brush Bronzewing
Eastern Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Southern Emu-wren
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Rufous Fantail
Grey Currawong
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
Dusky Antechinus
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
14 of the 33 FEIS’s have
disappeared from the site.
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have
disappeared from the site
based on this survey
Table 18:
FEIS Assessment of BVT, Wetlands & Swamps within the retarding basin reserve.
Decapod
Crustaceans
& Fish
Amphibians
Reptiles
Birds
Engaeus sp
Spotted Galaxias
Dwarf Galaxias
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Growling Grass Frog
Common Longnecked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Ballions Crake
Spotless Crake
Australasian Bittern
Nankeen Night Heron
Great Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Southern Emu-wren
White-fronted Chat
Clamorous Reed
Warbler
KEY
Red writing
indicates species
that have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the
reserve based
on this survey.
3.2.5
3.2.5.1
58% of FEIS’s still remain
which indicates a phase
2-3 extinction rate within
the scrub through-out the
site.
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
Mammals
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Swamp Rat
11 of the 26
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from the
wetlands and
swamps within
the reserve.
58% of FEIS’s
still remain which
indicates a
phase 2-3
extinction rate
within the
wetlands
through-out the
reserve.
Significant fauna of the Melbourne Water retarding basin
Significant fauna detected throughout the reserve during this survey.
Nationally significant species listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act
1999 were not detected during this survey. However two species are listed as internationally
migratory under the EPBC Act. Eleven State significant species were recorded during this
study and four of those species are listed under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 as
threatened. In addition, a further 13 species recorded are considered to be of regional
significance and five species recorded are considered to be of high local significance. The
53
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
remaining native fauna utilizing the site are considered to be at a local significance level due
to large population and habitat losses within the local area (Mornington Peninsula Shire).
3.2.5.2
Ecological significance of the study site.
The following lists the ecological significant values of the site:
x
The site retains old-growth EVC Freshwater Swamp Scrub, EVC Tall Marsh and EVC
Wetland Formation which are critical habitats for threatened and endangered fauna
species.
x
It has close links to Hiscock Road Reserve and Drum Drum Alloc Creek which form a
biolink between Tootgarook Wetland and Arthurs Seat State Park.
x
The retarding basin acts as a filter for storm water from the industrial estate before
it enters Drum Drum Alloc Creek.
x
The retarding basin provides a large fish and prey source for diving wetland birds,
tortoises and predatory fish
On the basis of significant flora & fauna species and endangered EVC’s occurring within the
study site, the reserve can be considered to be of state significance.
3.2.5.3
Habitat significance
The vegetation communities within the reserve contain important habitat for fauna species,
especially threatened species at a state level. The indigenous shrub communities support a
medium diversity of arboreal mammals and a high diversity of avifauna. The terrestrial
vegetation supports a medium to high diversity of terrestrial fauna and scrub-dwelling
avifauna.
The retarding basin retains permanent water levels through-put the year providing essential
habitat for a variety of aquatic fauna, tortoises and wetland bird species. As a permanent
wetland this site provides habitat for fauna species that require permanent water bodies
such-as fish species, amphibians, tortoises and aquatic diving birds. This site, Chinaman’s
Creek and two other nearby constructed wetlands provides the only permanent year-round
aquatic habitat through-out the entire greater wetlands.
Wetland flora communities also support threatened bird and reptile species. Some feral
species (such-as Feral Cats,*Red Fox and *Black Rat) are threatening some of the fauna
diversity within the study site and are currently being controlled within the surrounding
area.
54
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.2.5.4
Defining significant species
Fauna in the study site were classed according to their high local, regional and State
significant levels. As lists of regionally and locally significant fauna aren’t available from
relevant government authorities, those significant taxa were assessed by the author from his
previous records within the bioregion and Mornington Peninsula Shire.
Key to defining significant species
Signif
N
S
R
HL
DSE
FFG
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Cen
End
Vul
LR
NT
DD
Ls
M
Un
MC
LC
C
Lim
Significant/status of species is designated by:
National
State
Regional
High Local
Advisory list of threatened Vertebrate in Victoria-2013 (DSE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guaranteed Act 1988
Action Plan approved by Environmental Australia
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
International Treaties, C=China (CAMBA) and J=Japan (JAMBA).
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
lower risk-near threatened
Near Threatened
data deficient
Listed
Migratory under the EPBC Act
Uncommon
Moderately Common
Locally Common
Common
Limited
TABLE 19: Significant fauna detected throughout the retarding basin reserve during this survey.
Common Name
Amphibians
Southern Toadlet
Reptiles
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Delicate Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Pied Cormorant
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Royal Spoonbill
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Musk Lorikeet
Barn Owl
Scientific Name
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Sig
DSE.
S
Vul
Chelodina longicollis
Lampropholis delicata
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellina
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Australeps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
S
R
S
R
S
R
R
HL
R
DD
MC
Vul
MC
Vul
MC
MC
C
Un
Phalacrocorax varius
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Ardea alba
Nycticorax caledonicus hillii
Platalea regia
Aquila audax
Circus approximans
Glossopsitta concinna
Tyto alba
S
R
S
S
S
S
S
HL
HL
HL
R
LR
Un
Vul
Vul
Vul
LR
LR
Un
Un
MC
Un
FFG.
ActPl
Ls
Yes
Ls
Ls
Ls
Yes
Yes
Yes
EPBC
M
55
TR
CJ
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Common Name
Scientific Name
Sig
DSE.
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Crescent Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
Black Wallaby
Hirundapus caudacutus
Dacelo novaehollandiae
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Eopsaltria australis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
S
HL
R
R
R
Vul
Un
MC
Un
Un
Tachyglossus aculeatus
Wallabia bicolor
R
R
C
MC
Micro bats occurring throughout.
Swamp Rat
Tadarida, Chalinolobus &
Vespadelus sps.
Rattus lutreolus
R
C
R
C
FFG.
ActPl
EPBC
M
Map 4 below shows the locations of state threatened fauna species which were identified
within the reserve during this survey. Please note that small flocks of internationally
migratory White-throated Needletail were not recorded as landing within the reserve and so
are not recorded on map 4.
56
TR
CJ
Southern Toadlet
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Great Egret
KEY
Swamp Skink
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Grass Skink
Royal Spoonbill
Locations of state significant fauna species within the
retarding basin reserve
Map 4
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
57
Pied Cormorant
Reserve boundaries
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.2.6
Discussion
3.2.6.1
Indigenous Fauna
3.2.6.1.1
Decapod Crustacean
One species of Decapod Crustacean was identified within the EVC Freshwater Swamp Scrub
and around the northern edge of the retarding basin. Specimens were also sampled in bait
traps (see below). Here typical mud chimneys were observed in the wetter areas (see below).
Typical chimney construction of mud at the base of this Engaeus species burrow-entrance at the retarding basin. Photos M. Legg 2014.
3.2.6.1.2
Fish
One species of indigenous fish the Short-fined Eel and two species of introduced fish the
*Tench & *Mosquitofish (pictured below) were found to inhabit the retarding basin which
overflows into Drum Drum Alloc Creek. The three species of fish were sampled in bait traps
and the eel and *Tench were found to be low in population density levels. The *Mosquitofish
was found to be abundant within the retarding basin and probably inflicts detrimental
impacts upon aquatic fauna. They also provide a large food source for eels, tortoises and
wetland bird species. *Tench are known to stir-up the sediment causing muddy water,
which can have detrimentally ill effects on native fish.
Profiles above show a juvenile *Tench and *Mosquitofish which were both sampled within the retarding basin. Photos M. Legg 2014
58
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Short-finned Eel photographed at the retarding basin. Photo M. Legg 2013.
3.2.6.1.3
Amphibians
Medium to high population densities of Common Froglet, Southern Bullfrog, Spotted Marsh
Frog, Verreaux’s Tree Frog and Southern Brown Tree Frog were found to inhabit the
inundated sites trough-out the swamp scrub, amongst water plants, along the edges of the
retarding basin and within vegetation adjacent to the retarding basin. The occasion Spotted
Marsh Frog was found under dumped rubbish or observe jumping through vegetation
during spotlight walks.
Smaller populations of the state threatened Southern Toadlet were observed and heard
calling mainly around the edges of the retarding basin that become inundated during winter
rains. Spraying of herbicides needs to be limited in known toadlet habitat.
Rarer species which weren’t sampled during this survey and are probably extinct within the
area include: Victorian Smooth Froglet and Stripped Marsh Frog and Growling Grass Frog. It
is unlikely that future surveys within the greater area would identify these species.
3.2.6.1.4
Reptiles
Within the reserve reptile species and population densities appeared to be at a reasonably
high diversity and at low to medium population density levels. Low population densities are
probably due to the recent construction of the retarding basin, high feral predation of the
past and lack of indigenous understory habitat (such-as grasses and sedges) with terrestrial
logs. The southern section of the reserve was recently planted out with indigenous grasses
which will help to establish essential habitat. However terrestrial logs with small hollows
59
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
need to be deployed to provide additional habitat which will help to increase FFG listed
Swamp Skink and Glossy Grass Skink populations.
Currently Kikuyu patches do provide some habitat for reptile species but needs to be
replaced with indigenous grasses and sedges. Some terrestrial trunks were present within
old-growth paperbark patches, which provide homes for some skink species. Habitat
changing weed species are present and posing some impacts upon available essential
understorey habitat. The reptiles identified during this survey period and their habitats are
discussed below.
Reptiles identified within the reserve include tortoises, lizards and snakes. Two Common
Long-necked Tortoises were observed swimming within the eastern and western sections of
the retarding basin feeding upon aquatic invertebrates and fish. One FFG listed Swamp Skink
was sampled in an Elliot trap. Swamp Skinks within the reserve appear to be at low densities
and would probably increase if terrestrial logs with small hollows were deployed. The state
threatened Glossy Grass Skink was observed under fallen debris and occasionally under
dumped rubbish. Populations appear to be at a medium density and slightly higher than the
Swamp Skink.
Other small skinks observed included: Delicate Skink, Garden Skink, Metallic Skink and
Weasel Skink. All were observed either in the understorey or found under dumped rubbish.
Two Blotched Blue-tongues were observed in grasses around the edge of the retarding basin
and are breeding residents.
Three snake species were observed during the survey period and include: Lowland
Copperhead, White-lipped Snake and Tiger Snake. The White-lipped Snake was found under
dumped tin while the other two species were observed sunning themselves next to grass
tussocks. All three species population densities appear to be at low levels.
3.2.6.1.5
Birds
A medium diversity of birds inhabits the various habitats found through-out the reserve and
can be divided into three categories:
x
wetland birds
x
woodland birds
x
Introduced birds
60
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Wetland birds
During this survey wetland bird species identified throughout the reserve were observed
flying overhead, found to inhabit the various vegetation structures around the retarding
basin or observed swimming and feeding within the retarding basin.
Wetland birds identified flying overhead include: Australian Pelican, Australian White Ibis
and Straw-necked Ibis.
Wetland birds that enter the reserve to only feed include: Pied Cormorant, Little Pied
Cormorant, Great Cormorant, Purple Swamphen, Eurasian Coot, White-faced Heron, FFG
listed Great Egret, Nankeen Night Heron and Royal Spoonbill. All of these species were
observed either diving or wadding in the shallows preying upon a variety of aquatic fauna.
Residential and breeding wetland bird species include: Australasian Grebe, Pacific Black
Duck, Buff-banded Rail, FFG listed Lewin’s Rail, FFG listed Ballion’s Crake and Masked
Lapwing. Both rail & crake species were occasionally observed foraging in vegetation around
the edge of the retarding basin or heard calling from the vegetation cover.
Future habitat restoration projects and removal of habitat changing weeds should be staged
over a few years in order for rail & crake species to be able to adapt and adjust. Weeds
should be replaced with indigenous grasses and sedges.
Purple Swamphen and Pacific Black Ducks foraging on floating reeds within the retarding basin. Photo M. Legg November 2014.
61
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Pied Cormorant and Little Pied Cormorant pictured here feed regularly in the retarding basin. Photos M. Legg 2014.
Straw-necked Ibis and White-faced Heron were observed feeding in adjacent grasslands to the retarding basin. Photo M. Legg 2014.
Woodland birds
Several species of woodland birds were found to inhabit the swamp scrub, reeds and
understorey habitats found through-out the site and are discussed below.
A small flock of Stubble Quail visited the reserve during mid April and were observed
feeding along the southern boundary.
62
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Birds of prey were regularly observed flying over the reserve and surrounding vegetation,
while hunting for food or performing courtship displays. They include: Wedge-tailed Eagle
and Swamp Harrier which are not breeding residents but breed nearby.
Occasionally small flocks of Galahs, Cockatoos, Rainbow Lorikeets, Musk Lorikeets and
Eastern Rosellas were observed flying overhead or observed feeding in the exotic wattles on
the eastern boundary of the reserve.
Migratory birds within Australasia arrived at the reserve during spring & autumn and
include: Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo, Grey Fantail, Welcome Swallow, Clamorous Reed
Warbler and Silvereye. Majority of the species mentioned above bred within the reserve and
left for New Guinea and northern or eastern Australia during autumn post breeding. After
breeding the Silvereye migrates from Tasmania back to the mainland especially to the
Mornington Peninsula Shire where increase population densities were observed during late
summer and autumn. Within the retarding basin the Clamorous Reed Warbler breeds within
Common Reed and Cumbungi patches. The cuckoo is parasitic and lays its eggs in the nests
of honeyeaters, finches, wrens & thornbills and migrates to New Guinea after breeding.
During a spotlight walk on the 14-04-14 one Barn Owl was observed hunting from a swamp
scrub patch along the northern boundary.
Small flocks of e state threatened White-throated Needletail were observed flying overhead
and feeding on insects during summer months. They breed in Korea and migrate to
Australia during summer where they can be observed in aerial flight feeding on insects
usually in front of summer storms.
During April a pair of Laughing Kookaburra (pictured below) was observed stalking prey
from the acacia plantings.
Superb Fairy-wren, White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill are common permanent
breeding residents of thickets, undergrowth and canopies within the reserve.
Five species of honeyeaters were recorded throughout the reserve, mainly within the swamp
scrub and exotic acacia areas. These include the Red Wattlebird, Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater,
Yellow-faced Honeyeater, Crescent Honeyeater and New Holland Honeyeater. The Red
Wattlebird, Crescent Honeyeater and New Holland Honeyeater are breeding resident of the
reserve while the other two species are only feeding-foraging visitors to the reserve.
63
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
This Kookaburra was photographed in the acacia patch at the retarding basin. Photo M. Legg 2014.
The Eastern Yellow Robin and Grey Shrike Thrush are rare breeding resident within the
paperbark thickets of the reserve and can often be heard calling or observed feeding on
insects. Small numbers of Golden Whistler visited the reserve during May.
Common open country bird species such-as Willy Wagtail, Magpie-lark, Grey Butcherbird,
Australian Raven and Little Raven are common to rare visitors to the reserve. The Australian
Magpie is a breeding resident and was regularly observed.
Occasional small flocks of Golden-headed Cisticola and Little Grassbird were observed and
are breeding residents of grassy sites.
Introduced Birds
Five species of introduced birds inhabit the reserve and include: *Skylark, *European
Goldfinch, *Common Blackbird, *Common Starling and *Common Myna. The *Skylark,
*European Goldfinch and *Common Blackbird are breeding residents while the *Common
Starling and *Common Myna are foraging visitors.
Large flocks of starlings and mynas were observed during autumn feeding on blackberry
fruit. The *Common Blackbird and *Common Starling are prolific spreaders of noxious and
environmental weed seed.
64
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.2.6.1.5.1
Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
Results from the graph below indicate that bird species diversity within the reserve was the
lowest (23) during January and peaked at 42 species during April and May. This can be
attributed to post breeding period when bird species tend to move around from breeding
sites to other habitat patches adjacent or within the greater area.
The table below lists the fluctuations in bird species diversity within the reserve, during each
month of the survey period.
Graph 3: Fluctuations in bird species diversity within the reserve over an eight month period during this
survey.
45
40
35
30
25
No of bird species per
month
20
15
10
5
0
Oct
3.2.6.1.6
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Mammals
During this survey a low diversity of mammal species was recorded within the reserve. Other
species that should occur but were found to be absent include: White-footed Dunnart, Agile
Antechinus, Dusky Antechinus, Long-nosed Bandicoot, Southern Brown Bandicoot, Common
Wombat, Eastern Grey Kangaroo and Water Rat. Some of these species were known to occur
within the area over the last three decades. The mammals recorded during this survey are
discussed below.
Monotremes
One Short-beaked Echidna was encountered throughout the reserve and diggings from that
individual were regularly encountered. It is the same individual that was encountered at 3
65
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Dutton Street and was probably originally from nearby Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve.
Echidnas are breeding residents within the greater area whom roam over large areas
utilizing most habitats that contain a year-round supply of sought-after termites and ants.
Marsupials
Nocturnal possums encountered during the survey period include the Common Brushtail
Possum and Common Ringtail Possum. Both species were observed during spotlight walks
conducted through-out the reserve. Only one brushtail possum was observed in the exotic
acacia planting on the eastern border of the reserve. Several ringtail possums were observed
in the swamp scrub canopies and to a lesser degree within the exotic acacia planting. Here
they were observed or encountered either feeding in the swamp scrub canopy, heard calling
when disturbed and found in dreys which are constructed within the swamp scrub thickets.
Juveniles of ringtail possums were observed in autumn.
During spotlight walks the occasional Black Wallaby was encountered in the northern and
north-western section of the reserve. Scats were also encountered at these sites during field
work. It is unsure whether they are breeding residents of the reserve and are probably from
the adjacent Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve.
Placental Mammals
Three nights of recording micro-bat echolocation calls were conducted throughout this
survey. Micro-bats were seen on warm nights flying past the light beam of a torch, catching
and eating insects while in flight. Future micro-bat recordings could result in further species
identification, as some species are common one month and then absent the next. All
species of micro-bats that occur within the reserve are hollow dependent, nocturnal, and eat
three times their body weight in insects each night. Most species are feeding visitors to the
site and roost or breed elsewhere.
Swamp Rat populations appear to be at a stable level and were regularly sampled in Elliot
traps mainly along the southern and eastern edges of the retarding basin. Here they occupy
dense understory grass patches whether they be indigenous or weedy and don’t become
inundated with water. Underneath this vegetation they excavate runways and build nest
chambers at the end in burrows up to one meter long. Such activity is apparent throughout
their distribution within the reserve. They feed on a variety of rhizomes, seeds and other
various vegetation matters from the local and introduced graminoids.
66
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.2.6.1.7
Feral Mammals
*Red Fox
*Red Fox population densities appear to be low through-out the reserve and surrounding
area due to the MPS feral predator control program which has greatly reduced the fox
population’s through-out the greater Tootgarook Wetland and surrounding areas. The
occasional fox scat was mainly found along the edges of the reserve and a wetland bird kill
was encountered on the southern boundary of the reserve (see photo below). The MPS feral
predator control program should include this reserve and the previous reserve as part of its
feral control program. Appropriate method of fox control within the reserve includes
deploying foothold traps.
The remains of a Purple Swamphen which was slaughtered by a fox within the retarding basin. Photo M. Legg 2014.
*Feral Cat
Two *Feral Cats were encountered within the reserve during spotlight walks and population
densities appear to be at a low level. These cats are probably residents of the industrial
estate and stray to the reserve to hunt and claim territory. *Feral Cats cause large-scale
destruction of lizard and small bird populations and need urgent control. The MPS feral
predator control program should include this reserve and the previous reserve as part of its
feral control program to help eliminate *Feral Cats from the reserve and surrounding
industrial estate. Appropriate method of *Feral Cat control within the reserve includes
deploying cage traps.
67
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Feral Rodents
*Black Rat and *House Mouse populations appear to be at a medium level which can
contribute to a decline in populations of terrestrial fauna species and bird species & their
eggs. Both species of introduced rodent were sampled in Elliot traps and probably provide a
food source for predatory bird species. *Black Rat control needs to be adopted at this
reserve which will help secure threatened breeding birds, their eggs and chicks from this
feral menace. Appropriate method of feral rodent control within the reserve includes cage
trapping.
*European Rabbit
No *European Rabbits were found to occur within the reserve or surrounding area.
3.2.6.2
Habitat changing weeds
Habitat changing weed species are present within the reserve and are changing some
aspects of critical fauna habitat that remains. Most infestations are occurring around the
edges of the retarding basin and within the swamp scrub patches. The most serious
infestations which are changing indigenous habitats include: *Mirror Bush, *Spear Thistle,
*Flax-leaf Broom, *Sallow Wattle, *Kikuyu & other weedy grasses, *English Blackberry and
within the retarding basin *Water Crest. Most of the habitat-changing weed outbreaks have
the potential to take over causing large changes and destruction of essential habitats.
Consequently a large reduction in fauna population densities and species diversity will
occur.
Weed species are also providing habitat for some fauna species such-as rails, wrens and
skinks etc. and should only be removed over an extended period of time. Weeds being used
as habitat by fauna species must also be replaced with indigenous terrestrial plants such-as
grasses, sedges and prickly shrubs. The exotic acacias on the eastern boundary should be
replaced over time by indigenous gums, such-as Manna Gum and Swamp Gum.
*Sallow Wattle and *Kikuyu dominate these sites at the retarding basin. Photos M. Legg 2014.
68
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
*Flax-leaf Broom has the potential to invade the site and the exotic acacia planting on the eastern edge of the retarding basin.
Photos M. Legg.
3.2.6.3
Relative importance of key habitats
The reserve is an important section of the north-east edge of Tootgarook Wetland that still
retains significant vegetation and habitat. The dense reeds that surrounds and inhabits the
retarding basin supports breeding pairs of state and regionally threatened rails & crakes and
other wetland bird species. Populations of FFG listed Swamp Skinks and state threatened
Glossy Grass Skink are found to inhabit the dense grasses around the retarding basin.
Feeding habitats are also present for a number of state and regionally threatened wetland
bird species. The state threatened Southern Toadlet is also a breeding resident especially in
sites that become inundated during early winter. The reserve which is small in nature is an
extremely important site for the future survival of threatened species within Tootgarook
Wetland.
Old stands of Swamp Paperbark and Woolly Tea tree provide homes for possums and a
variety of bird species while fallen trunks within these patches provides homes for reptile,
amphibian and insect species. The small patches of EVC Tall Marsh (dominated by Common
Reed mainly found in the western section of the retarding basin) are an important breeding
site for the migratory Clamorous Reed Warbler which has been greatly reduced in population
densities over the last few decades.
During summer 2013-14 grasses were planted along the southern edge of the retarding
basin but some died due to the heat and wrong time of plant. Additional plantings
(including shrubs) within this section will provide additional habitat for a variety of
terrestrial and semi-terrestrial fauna species. The deployment of terrestrial logs with small
hollows will also contribute to a more stable ecosystem and thus provide additional homes
for several terrestrial fauna species including state threatened Swamp and Glossy Grass
Skinks.
69
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
This photo shows the failed planting site at the retarding basin which needs to be
replanted and habitat logs deployed. Photo M. Legg 2014.
Future considerations for the construction of additional breeding habitat such-as the
constructing of islands within the retarding basin would see safe breeding habitat for the
tortoise and a variety of wetland bird species.
Looking towards the western end of the retarding basin which reveals a variety of important habitats. Photos M. Legg.
3.2.6.4
Bio-links from the reserve to surrounding vegetation
The reserve is relatively small but is still an important section of remaining habitat along the
north-eastern edge of Tootgarook Wetland. It also acts as a buffer between the wetland and
the industrial estate. The retarding basin receives excess water from the industrial estate
and surrounding roads. The reserve links to adjacent Drum Drum Alloc Creek which is an
important wildlife biolink between the Tootgarook Wetland and the foothills to the east.
70
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Biolinks between this reserve and 3 Dutton Street to the south must be considered within
future development of that property. This will allow adequate movement of threatened
fauna species such as echidnas, reptiles, rails and crakes.
3.2.6.5
FEIS assessments
During this survey Broad Vegetation Types (BVT) scrub (wet) and wetlands & swamps were
assessed within the reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool. This is an assessment of
habitat specific fauna species that quickly disappear when their habitat changes at a rapid
rate. The assessments within the reserve indicated that 58% of FEIS‟s were present within
scrub and 58% within wetlands & swamps. This indicates a phase 2-3 extinction rate of
FEIS’s within both BVT’s assessed within the reserve.
Assessments indicted that large tree hollows (usually associate with eucalypts) are absent
due to only immature and exotic gums that are present. Terrestrial logs with small hollows
are largely absent and only confined to the old-growth swamp scrub, where old trunks have
fallen, especially under or around mature stands. On-going and integrated feral control
programs need to continue across the landscape in order to maintain and increase fauna
species diversity and population densities within the Tootgarook Wetland.
3.2.6.6
Monitoring FEIS’s and population densities within the reserve
A monitoring program within the reserve for FEIS species including threatened species
(found to be present) needs to be developed to measure fluctuations in population densities
and loss of species. Such species considered for future monitoring projects are listed in
tables 17 & 18 of this report.
A part of Australasian Grebes was regularly observed feeding within the retarding basin. Photo M. Legg 2014.
71
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.2.7
Recommendations for the Melbourne Water retarding basin
The following management recommendations are set out to help the reserve’s managers to
manage the fauna and habitat more appropriately in accordance with flora and fauna
requirements.
x
Continue to conduct fauna surveys every five years and carry out yearly
monitoring of FEIS’s, threatened indigenous fauna species and feral species
using Scout-guard cameras and analysing fox scats.
x
Recommendations for fauna species contained in Action Plans and Recovery
Plans under the FFG Act 1988 be sought to be implemented within the
reserve.
x
Establish bio-links between this reserve and 3 Dutton Street.
x
Investigate ways to remove the introduced *Tench from the retarding basin.
x
Limit herbicide spraying in known Southern Toadlet habitat only spray in late
spring and summer when this species is hibernating.
x
During revegetation projects deploy habitat logs with small hollows,
especially in the newly planted sites along the southern boundary.
x
Replace habitat changing weeds over a staged period with understorey plants
and prickly bushes.
x
Replace exotic acacias on the eastern boundary with Manna Gums and Swamp
Gums and allow Black Wattles to regenerate.
x
A vegetation buffer needs to be created along the entire southern and eastern
boundaries to protect the retarding basin habitat from impacts associated
with the construction and use of the adjacent industrial estate. During
plantings include grasses, sedges and prickly shrubs.
x
Strong recommendation is made to the shire to require on the industrial lots
that adjoin the retarding basin to have a building setback along the eastern
and southern boundaries. This will assist the provision of a vegetated buffer
to help insure protection of the essential wetland habitat values of the
retarding basin.
x
Investigate the viability of constructing breeding islands within the retarding
basin, which will allow for safe breeding of wetland bird species.
x
Include the reserve in the MPS feral control programs, targeting *Red Foxes,
*Feral Cats and *Black Rats.
72
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
x
Council and Melbourne Water as the managers of the reserve should develop
and install signage at the front of the site interpreting the environmental,
cultural and hydro-geological functions of the land parcel.
x
Investigate placing a covenant on the reserve through ‘Trust for Nature’.
x
Implement and deploy a fauna nesting box program and monitor. Focus on
constructing nesting boxes for wetland birds, Sugar Gliders and micro-bats.
x
Address key threats to habitat and bio-diversity.
Management actions should include the following and during weeding programs follow
these simple rules:
o
Conduct weeding in sections and span the process over five or so
years
o
Start from the good areas and work outwards and control invading
weeds on the edges.
o
Only remove woody weeds during the non-bird breeding season.
o
Leave if Eastern Yellow Robins or other birds are nesting.
o
Allow natural regeneration to occur.
o
If ringtail possum dreys or bird nests occur in weeds then ring-bark
with-out poisoning and follow-up after a year.
73
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3 Hiscock Road Reserve
3.3.1
Study site
The site is located across the northern section of Tootgarook Wetland and runs east to west
between Boneo Road and Truemans Road. Section 3 of the road reserve provides the only
vehicular access which is to the former Truemans Road landfill site. The section between
Boneo Road and Chinaman’s Creek is a constructed channel called Drum Drum Alloc Creek
approximately 1 kilometer long and covered in native vegetation and divides Rosebud West
with Boneo. The Boneo Road end of the road reserve is part of the Drum Drum Alloc Creek
reserve and follows the creek to its emergence with Chinaman’s Creek. Between
Chinaman’s Creek and the eastern edge of the Truemans Road landfill site the road reserve
is initially covered with Tall Marsh. The road reserve is approximately 3 kms long and its
location is Melways reference numbers 169 K7 to D7. The study site comprises scrub, reed
beds, Tootgarook Wetland & associated wetland communities and Coast Banksia Woodland.
For this survey the road reserve was been divided up into three sections and include:
x
x
Section 1- Boneo Road to the western edge of the retarding basin.
Section 2- Western edge of the retarding basin to the eastern boundary of the shire’s
former Truman’s Road landfill site, and
x
Section 3- Eastern boundary of the shire’s former Truman’s Road landfill site to
Truemans Road.
Refer to map 5 for locations of the three sections along Hiscock Road Reserve. Along
sections two & three fauna surveys were conducted up to 50m either side of the road
reserve as to obtain a larger range of fauna species diversity that might utilize the site.
3.3.2
Ecological Vegetation Classes
Ten Ecological Vegetation classes (EVC’s) are present along the road reserve and includes
EVC’s (002) Coast Banksia Woodland, (003) Damp Sands Herb-rich Woodland, (053)
Freshwater Swamp Scrub, (132) South Gippsland Plains Grassland, (136) Sedge Wetland,
(653) Aquatic Herbland, (656) Brackish Wetland, (821) Tall Marsh, (858) Coastal Alkaline
Scrub and (968) Gahnia Sedgeland. The diversity of EVC’s constitutes different habitat types
which provide homes for a high diversity of fauna species. Majority of these EVC’s are of
high quality apart from Coast Banksia Woodland and Coastal Alkaline Scrub found along
section 3 of the road reserve. These two EVC’s are heavily infested with habitat changing
weeds. The EVC’s that have been determined within the road reserve and their status are
displayed in the table below.
74
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
KEY
MAP 5
Locations of the 3 sections along Hiscock Road Reserve
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
75
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 20: EVC’s present along the road reserve.
EVC No
EVC’s
Status within Gippsland
Plain Bioregion
002
003
053
132
136
653
656
821
858
968
Coast Banksia Woodland
Damp sands Herb-rich Woodland
Freshwater Swamp Scrub
South Gippsland Plains Grassland
Sedge Wetland
Aquatic Herbland
Brackish Wetland
Tall Marsh
Coastal Alkaline Scrub
Gahnia Sedgeland
Vulnerable
Vulnerable
Endangered
Endangered
Vulnerable
Endangered
Rare
No listing
Depleted
3.3.3
Fauna detected within the road reserve
A total of 132 species of fauna were recorded along the road reserve during this survey. Of
these 120 species are native and 12 species are introduced. These consist of one species of
Decapod Crustacean, four species of fish (of which one species is introduced), seven species
of amphibians, 14 species of reptiles (of which one species is a tortoise, ten species are
lizards and three species are snakes), 90 species of birds (of these 85 are native species and
five species are introduced) and 16 species of mammals of which six species are introduced.
3.3.4
Results of field work conducted within the road reserve during this
survey (including net dipping, Elliot traps, scat analysis, bird
population survey, spotlighting, bat detection, Scout-guard camera
deployment, FEIS assessments and observations).
3.3.4.1
Fish sampling results
TABLE 21: Fish sampled in dip nets deployed throughout the road reserve, February 2014.
Species
Date
Burrowing Crayfish
Short-finned Eel
14-02-14
14-02-14
15-02-14
14-02-14
15-02-14
14-02-14
14-02-14
15-02-14
Common Galaxias
Spotted Galaxias
*Mosquitofish
Number
sampled
4
11
9
40+
50+
5
100+
100+
Area sampled
Water holes along section 2 of the road reserve.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
76
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.4.2
Bird species and population density survey results
TABLE 22: Bird species and population densities detected for each month along Hiscock Road Reserve
(Section 1) October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Stubble Quail
Little Pied Cormorant
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Purple Swamphen
Nankeen Night Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Masked Lapwing
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike-thrush
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australain Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
*European Goldfinch
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
Oct
2013
2B
2B
2B
4B
10+
20+
4B
1
2
Nov
6B
4B
2B
4B
6
10+
4B
1
2
Dec
6B
4B
2B
4B
Jan
2014
1
4B
2B
2B
1
10+
10+
4B
10+
10+
4B
2
2
Feb
May
7
4
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
3
1
10+
10+
4
2
1
4
2
4
2
2
4
3
15
10+
4
4
3
10+
8
2
3
3
10+
5
4
10+
10+
4
2
2
10+
4
4B
Apr
2
2
2
4
2B
Mar
6
5
4
4B
1
2
10+
2
10+
6
4
2
50+
10+
40+
30+
8
4
6
10+
4
5
4
4
2
6
4
2
2
8
11
10
6
2
6
2
8
2
4
4
8
2
6
6
1
6
3
4
2
4
4
6
3
5
3
10+
3
4
12
6
20+
10+
20+
20+
30+
10+
40+
50+
35
10+
10+
20+
20+
10+
10+
20+
70+B
75+B
80+B
60+B
60+
60+B
40+B
10+B
60+B
45+B
10+B
70+B
30+B
6B
60+B
30+B
6B
60+
30+
4
10+B
10+B
2
10+B
10+B
10+
4
2
6B
4B
4
4
2
6B
6B
6
4B
4B
2
4B
6
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
6
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
6B
3
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
2
2
4
3
6
50+
10+
50+
20+
4
6
4
10+
6
4
2
1
2
50+
10+
40+
30+
10+
2
10+
10+
77
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
TABLE 23: Bird species and population densities detected for each month along Hiscock Road Reserve
(Section 2) October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Australian Pelican
Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Pacific Black Duck
Chestnut Teal
Black Swan
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Dusky Moorhen
Purple Swamphen
White-necked Heron
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Masked Lapwing
Black-fronted Dotterel
Black-winged Stilt
Pacific Gull
Whiskered Tern
Black-shouldered Kite
Whistling Kite
White-bellied Sea-Eagle
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Collared Sparrowhawk
Swamp Harrier
Brown Falcon
Galah
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo
Southern Boobook
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Fantail
Mudlark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
*European Goldfinch
Silvereye
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
6
4
2
4B
6B
4B
2B
16B
2
30+
4B
6B
4B
2B
20+
8B
6B
6B
2B
18B
4
4
2
23
2
6
1
2
Jan
2014
Feb
20+
1
4
20+
11
6B
6B
2B
2
10+
4
4
2
4
4
Mar
Apr
May
4
6
2
4
2
7
4
6
2
2
5
3
4
3
2
2
2
2
10+
20+
8
20+
4
10+
10+
2
31
10+
6
1
100+
10+
2
22
6
12
16
1
8
7
5+
4
3
6
6
4
6
4
6
3
1
2
4
3
4
4
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2ad 2ju
2
2
1
1
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
4B
4B
4
4B
2
2
4B
2
4
10+
2B
2B
2B
2
50+B
50+B
20+B
50+B
50+B
20+B
50+B
50+B
25B
10+
60+B
60+B
30B
10+B
10+B
12B
12B
8B
12B
8B
16B
8B
14B
14
12B
10+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
18B
20+B
6B
6B
10B
35B
26B
45
20+B
35
10+
70+
60+
20+
4
4
10+
10+
16
10+
2
2
2
11
6
12
20+
20+
10+
10+
100+
5
8
5
1
4
3
4
70+
60+
20+
2
6
10+
6
14
10+
2
2
3
6
3
8
10+
20+
70+
60+
20+
4
5
10+
5
14
4
2
2
4
5
7
70+
60+
20+
3
7
10+
6
12
3
4
2
3
6
3
7
6
10+
60+
10+
40+
10+
30+
10+
10+
78
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
SPECIES
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
8B
8B
8B
4B
6
6
4
10+
6
4
10+
10+
10+
TABLE 24: Bird species and population densities detected for each month along Hiscock Road Reserve
(Section 3) October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Australian Pelican
Black Swan
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Purple Swamphen
Australasian Bittern
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Pacific Gull
Black-shouldered Kite
Whistling Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Brown Goshawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Brown Falcon
*Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
King Parrot
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike-thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
6
7
4B
2B
5
11
4B
2B
3
2
4B
2B
6
4B
4
4
4
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
4B
2B
4B
2
2
10+
10+
10+
10+
10+
10+
22
10+
10+
10+
8
7
1
6
3
2B
2ad 2ju
2ad2ju
2ad2ju
2
2
1
2
1
2ad 2ju
2
1
1
3
10+
2
2
4B
2
4B
4B
6B
6B
6B
2ad2ju
2
8B
10+
2B
2B
2B
2
2
2
1
1
2ad2ju
10+
6
10+
20+
20+
20+
5
6
6
8
2
3
4
16
5
3
5
3
40+
40+
40+
4
40+
20+
3
40+
30+
10+
8
4
6
4
2
2
2
4
6
2
4
2
3
3
6
5
40+
20+
5
6
3
10+
4
4
4
2
2
2
4
4
2
4
2
3
8
6
8
6
2B
2
60+B
60+B
60+B
10+
60+B
60+B
20+B
60+B
20+B
50+B
20+B
50+B
30+B
4B
4B
4B
4B
4B
4B
10B
16B
6B
6B
6
12B
10+B
2B
2B
2B
2B
2B
2B
6B
2B
6B
4B
10B
4B
4
4B
10+B
4B
10+B
14B
20+B
10+
50+
3
6
40+
20+
4
10+
20+
3
6
10+
12
5
2B
2B
4
2
4
4
8B
2
10+
2
4
4
6
2
4
4
2
6
2
4
2
4
12
6
8
4
11
5
10+
20+B
40+
10+
5
10+
20+
10+
79
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
SPECIES
Oct
2013
*European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
3.3.4.3
20+B
10+B
Nov
20+B
10+B
Dec
30+B
10+B
20+
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
30+
20+
10+
20+
5
10+
30+B
10+B
10+
20+
50+
10+
10+
20+
10+
6
2
30+
10+
10+
20+
30+
8
10+
10+
16
10+
10+
10+
Elliot trap survey results
TABLE 25: Fauna sampled in Elliot traps deployed through-out the road reserve, March to April 2014.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Skink
20-11-13
02-12-13
1 male
1 male &
1 female
2 males
1 male & 2
females
1 female
1 male & 1
female
1m
1m
1f
3
3
2
4
2
5
4
1
2
1
1
1
4
3
14-02-14
16-02-14
11-03-14
14-03-14
Blotched Blue-tongue
Swamp Rat
*Black Rat
*House Mouse
20-11-13
03-12-13
14-03-14
19-11-13
20-11-13
15-02-14
16-02-14
17-02-14
11-03-14
12-03-14
13-04-14
20-11-13
03-12-13
11-03-14
13-04-14
12-03-14
13-04-14
Area detected
Section 1, Transect 1, trap 7.
Section 1, Transect 1, traps 3 & 10.
Section 2 Transect 2, traps 4 & 13.
Section 2 Transect 2, traps 2, 4 & 12.
Section 3 Transect 3, trap 14.
Section 3 Transect 3, traps 7 & 10.
Section 1, Transect 1, trap 11.
Section 1, Transect 1, trap 8.
Section 3, Transect 3, trap 5.
Section 1, Transect 1, traps 2, 6 & 12.
Section 2 Transect 2, traps 1, 3 & 13
Section 2 Transect 2, traps 7 & 10
Section 2 Transect 2, traps 3, 7, 11 & 15
Section 2 Transect 2, traps 7 & 15
Section 3 Transect 3, traps 1, 4, 5, 9 & 12.
Section 3 Transect 3, traps 2, 5, 6, & 12.
Section 3 Transect 3, trap 11.
Section 1, Transect 1, trap 8.
Section 1, Transect 1, trap 2.
Section 3 Transect 3, trap 3.
Section 3 Transect 3, trap 5.
Section 3 Transect 3, traps 1, 3, 13, & 14.
Section 3 Transect 3, traps 1, 2 & 9.
80
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.4.4
Feral predator scat analysis
TABLE 26: Mammal hairs identified in fox and cat scats collected through-out the road reserve,
November 2013 to April 2014.
Predator Species
scat
Date collected
Non mammal remains
Mammal hairs analyzed within scat
*Fox 1
*Fox 2
*Fox 3
*Fox 4
*Fox 5
*Cat 1
*Cat 2
*Cat 3
28-11-13
22-12-13
02-02-14
18-03-14
12-04-14
22-12-13
02-02-14
12-04-14
Nil
Nil
Insects
Nil
Insects and berries
Feathers
Feathers
Nil
Common Ringtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Nil
Rat sp
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
*House Mouse
3.3.4.5
Spotlight walk results
TABLE 27: Fauna observed during spotlighting throughout the road reserve December 2013 to
April 2014.
Species
Amphibians
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Spotted Marsh Frog
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Birds
Lewin’s Rail
Ballion’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Nankeen Night Heron
Masked Lapwing
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Mammals
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
100+
100+
50+
20+
20+
20+
50+
20+
100+
20+
50+
20+
10+
20+
Through-out.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
Section 2 & 3.
Section 1 near retarding basin.
As above.
Through-out..
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
14-04-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
3
3
2
1
4
4
4
1
2
2
Section 2.
As above
As above
As above
Open areas.
As above.
As above
Old Manna Gum.
Scrub areas.
As above.
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
2
1
5
7
10+
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above
81
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Black Wallaby
Bat sps
*Fox
*Feral Cat
3.3.4.6
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
2
3
2
4 sps
5 sps
2sps
2
1
1
1
In Reeds.
As above.
As above
Flying through-out. Ns.
As above.
As above
Through-out.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
TABLE 28: Micro bats recorded on the Anabat 2 Bat Detector through-out the road reserve,
December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Large Forest Bat
Little Forest Bat
3.3.4.7
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
16
21
6
31
25
13
7
6
9
23
33
Flying above vegetation.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Scout-guard camera deployment
Two cameras were deployed along the road reserve and include one along section 2 and one
along section 3. They were deployed from 24-12-13 until the 10-04-14.
Below in the graph are the results recorded from this deployment.
Graph 4 Results of Scout-guard camera deployment along the road reserve, 24-12-13 to 10-04-14
60
50
Echidna
40
Black Wallaby
30
Blotched Blue-tongue
20
Nothing
10
*Fox
*Blackbird
0
Camera 1
Camera 2
82
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.4.8
Current status of Broad Vegetation Class ecosystems along the
road reserve using FEIS rapid assessment tool
After accessing along the road reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool, the tables
below list the FEIS’s that still occur and the species which have disappeared within Broad
Vegetation Classes across the site. A score is also given at a rating from 1 to 5 (which
relates to which extinction phase the site is currently experiencing) depending on loss of
FEIS’s.
Table 29: FEIS Assessment of BVT, Woodlands within the road reserve.
Decapod
Crustaceans
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. Of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
Engaeus sp
Tree Dragon
Whites Skink
Southern Water Skink
Eastern three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
McCoy’s Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
or
Common Blue-tongue
White-lipped Snake
Painted Button Quail
Buff-banded Rail
Southern Boobook
Powerful Owl
Eastern Rosella
Crimson Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Varied Sitella
White-throated Treecreeper
White-eared Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Crested Shrike-tit
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Rufous Fantail
Grey Fantail
Satin Flycatcher
Grey Currawong
Mistletoebird
Stubble Quail
Brush Bronzewing
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Sugar Glider
Feathertail Glider
Black Wallaby
Sothern Forest Bat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
25 of the 48
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from woodlands
along the road
reserve.
KEY
Red writing
indicates
species that
have either
disappeared or
become extinct
along the road
reserve based
on this survey.
.
48% of FEIS’s
still remain
which indicates
a phase 3
extinction rate
within the
woodlands
along the road
reserve.
83
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 30: FEIS assessment of scrub (wet) within road reserve.
Decapod Crustaceans,
Amphibians and
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
Engaeus sps
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Southern Water Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Brush Bronzewing
Eastern Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Southern Emu-wren
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Rufous Fantail
Grey Currawong
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
Dusky Antechinus
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
13 of the 33 FEIS’s
have disappeared from
the site.
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have
disappeared from the site
based on this survey.
61% of FEIS’s still
remain which indicates
a phase 2-3 extinction
rate within the scrub
through-out the site.
Table 31: FEIS Assessment of BVT, Wetlands & Swamps within the road reserve.
Decapod
Amphibians
Reptiles
Birds
Crustaceans
& Fish
Engaeus sp
Spotted
Galaxias
Dwarf Galaxias
KEY
Red writing
indicates
species that
have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the site
based on this
survey.
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Growling Grass Frog
Common Longnecked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass
Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Ballions Crake
Spotless Crake
Australasian Bittern
Nankeen Night Heron
Great Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Southern Emu-wren
White-fronted Chat
Clamorous Reed
Warbler
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
7 of the 26
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from the
wetlands and
swamps
within the
site.
Mammals
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown
Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Swamp Rat
73% of
FEIS’s still
remain which
indicates a
phase 1-2
extinction rate
within the
wetlands
through-out
the site.
84
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.5
3.3.5.1
Significant fauna detected along Hiscock Road Reserve
Significant fauna detected along the road reserve during this survey.
One nationally listed species the Australasian Bittern is listed under the Environment
Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 as Endangered was detected during this survey. Five
species are listed as internationally migratory under the EPBC Act. 19 State significant
species were recorded during this study. One species has been nominated and eight species
are listed under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 as threatened. In addition, a
further 26 species recorded are considered to be of regional significance and five species
recorded are considered to be of high local significance. The remaining native fauna
utilizing the road reserve are considered to be at a local significance level due to large
population and habitat losses within the local area (Mornington Peninsula Shire).
3.3.5.2
Ecological significance of the study site.
The site contains extensive critical breeding and foraging habitat (Tall Marsh) for the
nationally and state endangered Australasian Bittern. The site also provides breeding habitat
for state threatened species such-as Southern Toadlet, Swamp Skink, Glossy Grass Skink,
Lewin’s Rail, Baillon’s Crake, Great Egret, Little Egret and Royal Spoonbill etc. The site is also
an extensive parcel of land that travels across the entire northern section of Tootgarook
Wetland.
On the basis of significant flora & fauna species and endangered EVC’s occurring within the
study site, the road reserve can be considered to be of national to state significance.
3.3.5.3
Habitat significance
The vegetation communities along the road reserve contain the largest diversity of EVC’s
and associated habitats of any of the public land of the Tootgarook Wetland. Majority of the
road reserve alignment is not subjected to an environmental management regime by MPS or
MW despite the significant diversity of EVC’s and the presence of nationally and state
endangered or threatened species. The site also contains important habitat for fauna
species, especially threatened species at state and national levels.
The indigenous woodland & shrub communities support a medium diversity of arboreal
mammals and a high diversity of avifauna, The terrestrial vegetation supports a medium to
high diversity of terrestrial fauna and scrub-dwelling avifauna. The Tall Marsh supports
many endangered and threatened bird species including the Australasian Bittern. Wetland
85
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
flora communities also support threatened bird and reptile species. Some feral species
(such-as Feral Cats,*Red Fox and *Black Rat) are threatening some of the fauna diversity
within the site and are currently being controlled within the surrounding area.
3.3.5.4
Defining significant species
Fauna in the study site were classed according to their high local, regional, State and
national significant levels. As lists of regionally and locally significant fauna aren’t available
from relevant government authorities, those significant taxa were assessed by the author
from his previous records within the bioregion and Mornington Peninsula Shire.
Key to defining significant species
Signif
N
S
R
HL
DSE
FFG
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Cen
End
Vul
LR
NT
DD
Ls
M
Un
MC
LC
C
Lim
Significant/status of species is designated by:
National
State
Regional
High Local
Threatened Vertebrate in Victoria-2013 (DSE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guaranteed Act 1988
Action Plan approved by Environmental Australia
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
International Treaties, C=China (CAMBA) and J=Japan (JAMBA).
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
lower risk-near threatened
Near Threatened
data deficient
Listed
Migratory under the EPBC Act
Uncommon
Moderately Common
Locally Common
Common
Limited
TABLE 32: Significant fauna detected throughout the road reserve during this survey.
Common Name
Fish
Spotted Galaxias
Amphibians
Southern Toadlet
Reptiles
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Pied Cormorant
Scientific Name
Sig
DSE.
Galaxias truttaceus
R
MC
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
S
Vul
S
R
R
S
R
R
S
R
R
HL
R
DD
MC
MC
Vul
MC
Un
Vul
MC
MC
C
Un
S
LR
Chelodina longicollis
Bassian duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellina
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Australeps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Phalacrocorax varius
FFG.
Ls
ActPl
EPBC
Yes
86
TR
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Common Name
Scientific Name
Sig
DSE.
Australasian Shoveler
Freckled Duck
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Great Egret
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Black-fronted Dotterel
Black-winged Stilt
Pacific Gull
Whiskered Tern
White-bellied Sea Eagle
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Musk Lorikeet
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Southern Emu-wren
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Crescent Honeyeater
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Mistletoebird
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
Black Wallaby
Micro bats occurring throughout.
Swamp Rat
Anas rhynchotis
Stictonetta naevosa
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Porzana tabuensis
Ardea alba
Egretta garzetta
Nycticorax caledonicus hillii
Botaurus poiciloptilus
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Calidris acuminata
Elseyornis melanops
Himantopus himantopus
Larus pacificus
Chlidonias hybridus
Haliaeetus leucogaster
Aquila audax
Accipiter cirrhocephalus
Circus assimilis
Circus approximans
Glossopsitta concinna
Ninox novaehollandiae
Tyto alba
Hirundapus caudacutus
Dacelo novaehollandiae
Stipiturus malachurus
Acanthiza chrysorrhoa
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Petroica rodinogaster
Eopsaltria australis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Dicaeum hirundinaceum
S
S
R
S
S
R
S
S
S
N
S
S
R
R
R
S
S
S
HL
R
S
HL
HL
R
R
S
HL
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
Vul
En
Un
Vul
Vul
MC
Vul
En
LR
En
LR
LR
MC
MC
Un
LR
LR
Vul
Un
Un
LR
Un
MC
Un
Un
Vul
Un
Un
MC
MC
Un
Un
Un
Un
Tachyglossus aculeatus
Wallabia bicolor
Tadarida, Chalinolobus &
Vespadelus sps.
Rattus lutreolus
R
R
R
C
MC
C
R
C
FFG.
ActPl
EPBC
Ls
Yes
Ls
Ls
Yes
Yes
Ls
Ls
Yes
Yes
M
Ls
Yes
En
N
Ls
Yes
TR
CJ
M
M
CJ
CJ
M
CJ
M
CJ
Map 6 below shows the locations of national & state threatened fauna species which were
identified along the road reserve during this survey. Please note that small flocks of Pacific
Gull & internationally migratory White-throated Needletail were not recorded as landing
within the reserve and so are not recorded on map 6.
87
Section 3
Section 2
Section 1
MAP 6
Southern Toadlet
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Pied Cormorant
Australasian Shoveller
Freckled Duck
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Great Egret
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Whiskered Tern
Spotted Harrier
White-bellied Sea -Eagle
KEY
Locations of National & State significant fauna species identified along Hiscock Road
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
88
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.6
Discussion
3.3.6.1
Indigenous Fauna
3.3.6.1.1
Decapod Crustacean
One species of Decapod Crustacean was identified along the road reserve and was found to
inhabit the Freshwater Swamp Scrub and Tall Marsh EVC’s. In these communities typical
mud chimneys were observed on the soils (see photo below).
Typical chimney construction of mud at the base of this Engaeus species burrow-entrance along the road reserve. Photos M. Legg 2014.
3.3.6.1.2
Fish
Three species of indigenous fish, Short-fined Eel, Common Galaxias & Spotted Galaxias
(pictured below) and the introduced *Mosquitofish were found to inhabit water holes found
along section 2 of the road reserve. The water holes are what remained of the wetland when
it was flooded in winter & spring 2013.
Fish were not sampled in Chinaman’s Creek as adequate surveys were conducted during
other surveys. All species of fish were sampled in dip nets or by observation and were found
to be quite high in population densities, apart from the Spotted Galaxias.
The *Mosquitofish was found to be abundant through-out, but most fish species died in
early autumn when these water holes dried up. The Mosquitofish and other species provide
a large food source for tortoises and wetland bird species.
89
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Common Galaxias and Spotted Galaxias stranded in a water hole along section 2 of the road reserve. Photo C. Brown 2014
3.3.6.1.3
Amphibians
Medium to high population densities of Common Froglet, Southern Bullfrog, Verreaux’s Tree
Frog and Southern Brown Tree Frog were found to inhabit the inundated sites along the road
reserve. The occasional Spotted Marsh Frog was heard calling along section 1 adjacent to
the retarding basin. Haswells Froglet were heard calling along sections 2 & 3 while the state
threatened Southern Toadlet was heard calling along all three sections.
Rarer species which weren’t sampled during this survey and are probably extinct within the
area include: Victorian Smooth Froglet, Stripped Marsh Frog and Growling Grass Frog. It is
unlikely that future surveys within the greater area would identify these species.
3.3.6.1.4
Reptiles
Reptile species and population densities appeared to be at a reasonably high diversity and at
low to medium population density level through-out the road reserve. Low population
densities are probably due to the large stretch of the road reserve that becomes inundated
during winter and spring. However population densities increased along the road reserve in
the raised areas of sections 1 & 3. During recent habitat restoration projects terrestrial logs
with small hollows have been deployed along section 1 of the road reserve. This has
provided additional habitat and helped to increase reptile population densities.
90
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Other terrestrial trunks were present along the road reserve especially in section 2 where
old-growth paperbark patches occur. These provide homes for some skink species
especially the state threatened Swamp and Glossy Grass Skinks. Some habitat changing
weed species are present and posing some impacts upon available essential understorey
habitat. The reptiles identified during this survey period and their habitats are discussed
below.
Reptiles identified along the road reserve include a species of tortoise, lizards and snakes.
The occasional Common Long-necked Tortoise was observed either feeding or swimming in
water holes and Chinaman’s Creek. Eleven state threatened Swamp Skinks were sampled in
Elliot traps along all three sections and others were observed sunning themselves at the
base of tussocks or fallen timber. Swamp Skinks within sections 1& 2 appear to be at
medium population density while along section 3 at a low population density.
Along sections 1 & 3 the state threatened Glossy Grass Skink was observed under fallen
debris and occasionally under dumped rubbish. Populations appear to be at a medium
density through-out these sections. Other small skinks observed included: Eastern Threelined Skink, Delicate Skink, Garden Skink, Metallic Skink, Southern Grass Skink and Weasel
Skink. All were observed either in the understorey or found under logs, dumped rubbish and
fallen debris. The occasional Blotched & Common Blue-tongues were observed in grasses
along sections 1 & 3 and appear to be at low population densities.
Three snake species were observed during the survey period and include: Lowland
Copperhead, White-lipped Snake and Tiger Snake. The White-lipped Snake was found under
terrestrial logs while the other two species were observed sunning themselves next to grass
tussocks. All three species population densities appear to be at a low to medium level.
Metallic Skink photographed on a terrestrial log deployed along section 1 of the road reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
91
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.6.1.5
Birds
A large diversity of birds inhabits the various habitats found along the road reserve and can
be divided into three categories:
x
wetland birds
x
woodland birds
x
Introduced birds
Wetland birds
During this survey wetland bird species identified along the road reserve were observed
either flying overhead, found to inhabit the various vegetation communities or observed in
inundated areas such-as along section 2. Wetland birds identified flying overhead include:
Australian Pelican, Little Pied Cormorant, Great Cormorant, Australian White Ibis, Strawnecked Ibis, Pacific Gull and Whiskered Tern.
Wetland birds that were observed either breeding or feeding along the road reserve include:
Pied Cormorant, Black Swan, Pacific Black Duck, Chestnut Teal, Buff-banded Rail, FFG listed
Lewin’s Rail, FFG listed Baillon’s Crake, Spotless Crake, Dusky Moorhen, Purple Swamphen,
White-necked Heron, White-faced Heron, FFG listed Great Egret, FFG listed Little Egret,
Nankeen Night Heron, EPBC listed Australasian Bittern, Royal Spoonbill, internationally
migratory Latham’s Snipe, internationally migratory Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Masked
Lapwing, Black-fronted Dotterel and Black-winged Stilt. Several of these species are either
endangered or threatened at national, state & regional levels and are important ecological
components of Tootgarook Wetland.
The EPBC listed Australasian Bittern was observed foraging in Tall Marsh along section 2 of
the road reserve close to the south-eastern edge of the former Truemans Road land fill site.
Recent observations have concluded that this endangered species is utilizing Tall Marsh
habitat between Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve and the former Truemans Road land fill
site. This also includes Tall Marsh on private properties at 92 Elizabeth Avenue and 220
Browns Road. It is also possible that this species is utilizing this area as a breeding site
which is ideal habitat for such an activity. Further urgent monitoring is required to
determine the status of the bittern within the greater Tootgarook Wetland, to determine
whether this species is a breeding resident and if so to determine where this species is
breeding in order to fully protect the sites.
Future habitat restoration projects and removal of habitat changing weeds should be staged
over a few years in order for rail & crake species etc. to be able to adapt and adjust. Weeds
should be replaced with indigenous grasses and sedges.
92
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
An Australasian Bittern pictured here flying out of Tall Marsh along section 2 of Hiscock Road Reserve. Photos Cameron Brown 2014.
Purple Swamphen and Royal Spoonbill pictured here feeding along section 2 of the road reserve. Photos M. Legg 2014.
A flock of Australian White Ibis and three Great Egrets roosting on a raised island along section 2 of the road reserve.
Photo M. Legg November 2013.
93
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Low population densities of state threatened Australasian Shoveler and FFG listed Freckled
Duck were not detected during this survey but were detected by the author during winter
2013, within the vicinity of section 2 of the road reserve. Due to their winter migration to
Tootgarook Wetland both species have been included within the over-all species list for this
site.
Freckled Duck photographed near Hiscock Road Reserve, section 2. Photo Cameron Brown 2013.
Woodland birds
Several species of woodland birds were found to inhabit the woodland, scrub, reeds and
understorey habitats found along the road side reserve and are discussed below.
A small flock of Stubble Quail visited section 1 of the road reserve during mid April and
were observed feeding within grass tussocks.
Birds of prey were regularly observed flying over the road reserve and surrounding
vegetation, while hunting for food or performing courtship displays. They include: Blackshouldered Kite, Whistling Kite, FFG listed White-bellied Sea-Eagle, Wedge-tailed Eagle,
Spotted Harrier, Swamp Harrier, Brown Goshawk, Collared Sparrowhawk and Brown Falcon.
All are breeding residents of Tootgarook Wetland except the White-bellied Sea-Eagle,
Wedge-tailed Eagle and Spotted Harrier which bred elsewhere.
Occasionally small flocks of Galahs, Cockatoos, Rainbow Lorikeets, Musk Lorikeets and
Eastern Rosellas were observed flying overhead or observed feeding in the woodlands along
sections 1 & 3 of the road reserve. During May a small flock of King Parrots flew over section
3 of the road reserve and landed in a Coast Banksia nearby.
94
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Adult and juvenile Black-shouldered Kites roosting in a dead Coast Banksia along section 3 of the road reserve.
Photos M. Legg, March 2014.
Migratory birds within Australasia arrived along the road reserve during spring and autumn
These include: Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo, Shining Bronze-Cuckoo, Pink Robin, Grey Fantail,
Welcome Swallow, Clamorous Reed Warbler, Mistletoebird and Silvereye. Majority of the
species mentioned above bred along the road reserve and left for northern or eastern
Australia during autumn post breeding. After breeding the Silvereye migrates from
Tasmania back to the mainland especially to the Mornington Peninsula Shire where increase
population densities were observed during late summer and autumn. Within the Tall Marsh
communities the Clamorous Reed Warbler bred within Common Reed patches. The cuckoo is
parasitic and lays its eggs in the nests of honeyeaters, finches, wrens and thornbills. They
migrate to New Guinea after breeding. During mid autumn the occasional Pink Robin was
observed in scrub patches.
During spotlight and day walks the occasional Southern Boobook and Barn Owl were
observed either roosting or hunting from swamp scrub patches along the road reserve.
Small flocks of the state threatened White-throated Needletail were observed flying
overhead and feeding on insects during summer months. They breed in Korea and migrate
to Australia during summer where they can be observed in aerial flight feeding on insects
usually in front of summer storms.
During April a pair of Laughing Kookaburra was observed stalking prey from the old Manna
Gum along section 1 of the road reserve.
Superb Fairy-wren, White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill are common permanent
breeding residents of thickets, undergrowth and canopies along the road reserve.
95
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
A small flock of Southern Emu-wrens was observed within the vicinity of section 3 of the
road reserve which indicates that this species still survives on the Mornington Peninsula.
Previous records from the author’s field work indicate that the Tootgarook Wetland
population might be the last remaining population within the shire. Typical habitat utilized
by this species includes Common Reed patches, Gahnia tussocks and adjacent swamp scrub
patches.
Small flocks of Spotted Pardalote were observed during autumn feeding in the canopies of
swamp scrub and woodlands along the road reserve.
Eight species of honeyeaters were recorded throughout the road reserve, mainly within the
swamp scrub and woodland areas. These include the Red Wattlebird, Little Wattlebird,
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater, Noisy Miner, Yellow-faced Honeyeater, Crescent Honeyeater,
New Holland Honeyeater and Eastern Spinebill. All species are either breeding residents or
breed nearby to the road reserve.
The Eastern Yellow Robin and Grey Shrike Thrush are breeding resident within the paperbark
thickets and woodlands along the road reserve and can often be heard calling or observed
feeding on insects.
Common open country birds such-as Willy Wagtail, Magpie-lark, Grey Butcherbird,
Australian Magpie, Australian Raven and Little Raven are common to rare visitors or
breeding residents along the road reserve.
Occasional flocks of Golden-headed Cisticola and Little Grassbird were observed and are
breeding residents of grassy or Common Reed sites. During autumn small flocks of Redbrowed Finch were observed feeding along the ground on grass seeds.
Introduced Birds
Five species of introduced birds inhabit the road reserve and include: *Spotted Turtle-Dove,
*European Goldfinch, *Common Blackbird, *Common Starling and *Common Myna. The
*Spotted Turtle-Dove is a breeding resident along section 3 while the *European Goldfinch
and *Common Blackbird are breeding residents through-out. The *Common Starling and
*Common Myna are mainly foraging visitors.
Large flocks of starlings and mynas were observed during autumn feeding on blackberry
fruit. The *Common Blackbird and *Common Starling are prolific spreaders of noxious and
environmental weed seed.
96
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.6.1.5.1
Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
Results from the graph below indicate that bird species diversity along section 1 of the road
reserve was the lowest (23) during October & November and peaked at 41 species during
April. Bird species diversity along section 2 of the road reserve was the lowest (24) during
October and peaked at 45 species during February. Bird species diversity along section 3 of
the road reserve was the lowest (26) during October and peaked at 44 species during May.
This can be attributed to post breeding period when bird species tend to move around from
breeding sites to other habitat patches adjacent to the road reserve or within the greater
area. The table below lists the fluctuations in bird species diversity, within each section,
along the road reserve and during each month of the survey period.
Graph 5: Fluctuations in bird species diversity along sections 1, 2 & 3 of the road reserve and over an
eight month period during this survey.
50
45
40
35
30
Section 1
25
Section 2
20
Section3
15
10
5
0
Oct
3.3.6.1.6
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Mammals
During this survey a low to medium diversity of mammal species was recorded along the
road reserve. Other species that should occur but were found to be absent include: Whitefooted Dunnart, Agile Antechinus, Dusky Antechinus, Long-nosed Bandicoot, Southern
Brown Bandicoot, Common Wombat, Eastern Grey Kangaroo and Water Rat. Some of these
species were known to occur within the area over the last three decades. The mammals
recorded during this survey are discussed below.
97
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Monotremes
Occasional Short-beaked Echidna was encountered along sections 1 & 3 of the road reserve
and diggings from those individuals were regularly encountered. Echidnas are breeding
residents within the greater area whom roam over large areas utilizing most habitats that
contain a year-round supply of sought-after termites and ants.
Marsupials
Nocturnal possums encountered during the survey period include the Common Brushtail
Possum and Common Ringtail Possum. Both species were observed during spotlight walks
conducted along the road reserve. Only two brushtail possums were observed in canopies of
the woodland areas. Several ringtail possums were observed in the swamp scrub canopies.
Here they were observed or encountered either feeding in the swamp scrub canopy, heard
calling when disturbed and found in dreys which are constructed within the swamp scrub
thickets. Juveniles of ringtail possums were observed in autumn.
The occasional Black Wallabies was encountered along the road reserve during spotlight
walks and scats were also encountered at these sites during field work. Along sections 2 & 3
several individuals were filmed on Scout-guard cameras and one female was filmed with her
joey. Such footage is rare and indicates that the Black Wallaby are breeding residents of the
area.
Placental Mammals
Three nights of recording micro-bat echolocation calls were conducted throughout this
survey. Micro-bats were seen on warm nights flying past the light beam of a torch, catching
and eating insects while in flight. Future micro-bat recordings could result in further species
identification, as some species are common one month and then absent the next. All
species of micro-bats that occur along the road reserve are hollow dependent, nocturnal,
and eat three times their body weight in insects each night. Most species are feeding visitors
to the site and roost or breed elsewhere.
Swamp Rat populations appear to be at a stable level and were regularly sampled in Elliot
traps mainly along sections 1 & 3. Here they occupy dense understory grass patches
whether they be indigenous or weedy and don’t become inundated with water. Underneath
this vegetation they excavate runways and build nest chambers at the end in burrows up to
one meter long. Such activity is apparent throughout their distribution along the road
reserve. They feed on a variety of rhizomes, seeds and other various vegetation matters
from the local and introduced graminoids.
98
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
This Swamp Rat was sampled in an Elliot trap along section 1 of the road reserve. Photo M. Legg 2013.
3.3.6.1.6.1
Feral mammals
*Red Fox
*Red Fox population densities appear to be low through-out the road reserve and
surrounding area due to the MPS feral predator control program which has greatly reduced
the fox population’s through-out Tootgarook Wetland and surrounding areas. The
occasional fox scat was mainly found along sections 1 & 3 of the road reserve. The MPS feral
predator control program should include the road reserve as part of its feral control
programs of the area. Appropriate method of fox control within the reserve includes
deploying foothold traps.
*Feral Cat
Occasional *Feral Cat or their scats were encountered along the road reserve mainly along
sections 1 & 3. Population densities appear to be at a low level and these cats were probably
residents of the industrial estate and housing estates opposite Truemans Road. *Feral Cats
cause large-scale destruction of lizard and small bird populations and need urgent control.
The MPS feral predator control program should include the road reserve as part of its feral
control program to help eliminate *Feral Cats along the road reserve and surrounding
estates. Appropriate method of *Feral Cat control along the road reserve includes deploying
cage traps.
Feral Rodents
*Black Rat and *House Mouse populations appear to be at a medium level which can
contribute to a decline in populations of terrestrial fauna species and bird species & their
eggs. Both species of introduced rodent were sampled in Elliot traps and probably provide a
99
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
food source for predatory bird species. *Black Rat control needs to be adopted along the
road reserve which will help secure threatened breeding birds, their eggs and chicks from
this feral menace. Appropriate method of feral rodent control along the road reserve
includes deploying cage traps.
*European Rabbit
No *European Rabbits were found to occur along the road reserve or surrounding area.
Fallow Deer
Occasional fallow Deer footprint or scat was observed from one individual along section 3 of
the road reserve. It is possible that a small population persists within the area.
3.3.6.2
Habitat changing weeds
Several habitat changing weed species are present along the road reserve and are mainly
found along section 3. Such weeds are changing some aspects of critical fauna habitat that
remains. Most infestations are occurring along the edge, on raised sites and within some
swamp scrub patches.
The most serious infestations which are changing indigenous habitats include: * Boneseed,
*Cotoneaster, *Box Thorn, *Cape Ivy, *Cape Wattle, *Coast Tea Tree, *Desert Ash, *Gorse,
*Fennel, *Polygala, *Spear Thistle, *Sallow Wattle, *Kikuyu & other weedy grasses, *Spike
Rush, *English Blackberry and *Fleabane. Most of the habitat-changing weed outbreaks have
the potential to take over causing large changes and destruction of essential habitats.
Consequently a large reduction in fauna population densities and species diversity will
occur.
Recent habitat restoration project along section 1 has seen the removal of all habitat
changing weed species and replaced with indigenous plants. A dense understory of poas has
created ideal habitat for several terrestrial and semi-terrestrial species.
Weed species are also providing habitat for some fauna species such-as rails, crakes, wrens
and skinks etc. and should only be removed over an extended period of time. Weeds being
used as habitat by fauna species must also be replaced with indigenous terrestrial plants
such-as grasses, sedges and prickly shrubs.
The Coast Banksia Woodland EVC along section 3 of the road reserve is suffering from
intense die-back due to high invasion of habitat weeds and possibly pytophora. Pytophora
investigation is warranted and urgent restoration of this woodland is urgently required.
100
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
*Cotoneaster, *English Blackberry and *Fennel dominate these sites along section 3 of the road reserve. Photos M. Legg 2014.
*Polygala dominates this site. Coast Tea-tree and other weeds are causing die-back of the Coast Banksia Woodland along section 3 of the
road reserve. Photos M. Legg 2014.
3.3.6.3
Relative importance of key habitats
The road reserve is an important section of the northern area of Tootgarook Wetland that
still retains significant vegetation and habitat. The dense reed and swamp scrub habitats
support breeding pairs of national, state and regionally threatened wetland bird species
including the EPBC listed Australasian Bittern.
Populations of FFG listed Swamp Skinks and state threatened Glossy Grass Skink are found
to inhabit the dense grasses along sections 1 & 3 of the road reserve. The state threatened
Southern Toadlet is also a breeding resident especially in sites that become inundated
during early winter. The road reserve which is long but thin in nature is an extremely
important site for the future survival of threatened species within Tootgarook Wetland.
Old stands of Swamp Paperbark and Woolly Tea-tree provide homes for possums and a
variety of bird species while fallen trunks within these patches provides homes for reptiles,
amphibians and insect species.
101
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
This photo shows the important swamp scrub and Tall Marsh habitats along section 2 of the road reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
The large patches of EVC Tall Marsh (picture above) dominated by Common Reed are mainly
found along section 2 of the road reserve and are important breeding & feeding sites for the
migratory Clamorous Reed Warbler and the nationally endangered Australasian Bittern.
During recent years a habitat restoration project was conducted along section 1 of the road
reserve and now provides ideal habitat for terrestrial and semi-terrestrial species. Several
tussock grasses were planted and a variety of terrestrial logs with small hollows were
deployed. This has provided a high quality habitat and shelter for several threatened fauna
species such-as the Swamp Skink and Glossy Grass Skink.
Habitat restoration project along section 1 of the road reserve shows dense poa plantings and the deployment of habitat logs.
Photos M. Legg 2014.
102
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
An Australasian Bittern was discovered in the dense stands of Common Reed (pictured above) found along section 3 of the road reserve.
Photo M. Legg 2014.
3.3.6.4
Bio-links from the road reserve to surrounding vegetation
The road reserve is relatively long but narrow and is still an important section of remaining
habitat found along the northern section of Tootgarook Wetland. It helps to link the eastern
edge with the western edge of Tootgarook Wetland. The road reserve also links Drum Drum
Alloc Creek with Chinaman’s Creek which is an important wildlife biolink between the
wetland and the foothills to the east.
Biolinks between the road reserve and the previous reserve (retarding basin) to the south are
apparent and help habitat specific fauna to move between reserves.
3.3.6.5
FEIS assessments
During this survey Broad Vegetation Types (BVT) woodlands, scrub (wet) and wetlands &
swamps were assessed along the road reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool. This is
an assessment of habitat specific fauna species that quickly disappear when their habitat
changes at a rapid rate.
The assessments along the road reserve indicated that 48% of FEIS’s were present within
woodlands, 61% of FEIS‟s were present within scrub and 73% within wetlands & swamps.
103
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
This indicates a phase 1-3 extinction rate of FEIS’s within BVT’s assessed along the road
reserve.
Assessments indicted that large tree hollows (usually associate with eucalypts) are rare and
only found in one old-growth Manna Gum in section 1 of the road reserve. Terrestrial logs
with small hollows are found along section 1 and within old-growth scrub patches along the
road reserve. On-going and integrated feral control programs need to continue across the
landscape in order to maintain and increase fauna species diversity and population densities
within the Tootgarook Wetland.
3.3.6.6
Monitoring FEIS’s and population densities along the road reserve
A monitoring program along the road reserve for FEIS species including other threatened
species (found to be present) needs to be developed to measure fluctuations in population
densities and loss of species. Such species considered for future monitoring projects are
listed in tables 29, 30 & 31 of this report.
A separate monitoring program for Australasian Bittern needs to be designed and
implemented immediately. This will help protect the species and identify if and where they
are breeding.
Black-winged Stilt pictured here feeding along section 2 of the road reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
104
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.3.7
Recommendations for Hiscock Road Reserve
The following management recommendations are set out to help the road reserve managers
to manage the fauna and habitat more appropriately in accordance with flora and fauna
requirements.
x
Immediately implement an Australasian Bittern monitoring program to
determine
breeding
and
foraging
sites
which
require
full
on-going
protection.
x
Adopt management recommendations from the Australasian Bittern Recovery
and Action Plans and Implement through-out the greater Tootgarook
Wetland.
x
Fully protect the EVC Tall Marsh habitat of the Australasian Bittern from
development and destruction on both private and public land especially at 92
Elizabeth Avenue.
x
Adopt management recommendations from state threatened fauna species
(which are listed on the FFG ACT 1988) Recovery and Action Plans and
Implement through-out the greater Tootgarook Wetland.
x
Strong recommendation is made to the shire to require on the vacant
industrial lots that adjoin section 1 of the road reserve to have a building
setback along the southern boundaries of the road reserve. This will assist
the provision of a vegetated buffer and widening of the bio-link to help
insure protection of the essential wetland habitat values along the road
reserve.
x
Continue to conduct fauna surveys every five years and carry out yearly
monitoring of FEIS’s, threatened indigenous fauna species and feral species
using Scout-guard cameras and analysing fox scats.
x
Stage weed removal over a five year period and replace with prickly shrubs.
Deploy habitat logs and replant important understorey plants with grasses
and sedges.
x
Restore the Coast Banksia Woodland along section 3 and investigate if
pytophora fungus is contributing to the die-back.
x
Include the road reserve in the MPS feral control program focusing on *Red
Foxes, *Feral Cats and *Black Rats.
x
Lobby council to decommission the road reserve and rezone it into a
conservation reserve.
105
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
x
Limit herbicide spraying in known Southern Toadlet habitat only spray in late
spring and summer when this species is hibernating.
x
Implement a fauna nesting box program and monitor. Focus on constructing
nesting boxes for wetland birds, Sugar Gliders and micro-bats.
x
Council and Melbourne Water as the managers of the road reserve should
develop and install signage interpreting the environmental, cultural and
hydro-geological functions of the land parcel at a prominent location
possibly at the Boneo and Truemans Road entrances.
x
Address key threats to habitat and bio-diversity and apply for grants to
restore habitat.
Management actions should include the following and during weeding projects follow these
simple rules:
o
Don’t spray herbicide in known Southern Toadlet habitat.
o
Conduct weeding in sections and span the process over five or so
years
o
Start from the good areas and work outwards and control invading
weeds on the edges.
o
Only remove woody weeds during the non-bird breeding season.
o
Leave if Eastern Yellow Robins or other birds are nesting.
o
Allow natural regeneration to occur.
o
If ringtail possum dreys or bird nests occur in weeds then ring-bark
with-out poisoning and follow-up after a year.
106
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4 40 Colchester Road Reserve
3. 4.1
Study site
The study site is located in the parish of Rosebud West, is situated between Hiscock Road
and the freeway reserve and is located at the end of Colchester Road within the Rosebud
West Industrial Estate. It is also located on the eastern edge of Tootgarook Wetland and falls
within the Mornington Peninsula Shire, Victoria. The reserve is approximately 8.85 hectares
in size and its location is Melways reference number 169 J7. The study site comprises exotic
grasslands, swamp scrub patches, Tall Marsh a drain and wetlands.
3.4.2
Ecological Vegetation Classes
Six Ecological Vegetation classes (EVC’s) are present within the reserve and includes EVC’s
(003) Damp sands Herb-rich Woodland, (053) Freshwater Swamp Scrub, (132) South
Gippsland Plains Grassland, (653) Aquatic Herbland, (656) Brackish Wetland and (821) Tall
Marsh. Other EVC’s are probably apparent but have not been mapped at present. The
diversity of EVC’s constitutes different habitat types which provide homes for a medium
diversity of fauna species.
Majority of these EVC’s are of high quality apart from South Gippsland Plains Grassland and
parts of Freshwater Swamp Scrub. These two EVC’s have infestations of habitat changing
weeds and pasture grasses. The EVC Damp sands Herb-rich Woodland is very small in its
present form and is located on the southern boundary where an old-growth Manna Gum
occurs. The EVC’s that have been determined within the reserve and their status are
displayed in the table below.
Table 33: EVC’s present within 40 Colchester Road.
EVC No
EVC’s
Status within Gippsland
Plain Bioregion
003
053
132
653
656
821
Damp sands Herb-rich Woodland
Freshwater Swamp Scrub
South Gippsland Plains Grassland
Aquatic Herbland
Brackish Wetland
Tall Marsh
Vulnerable
Endangered
Endangered
Endangered
Rare
No listing
107
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4.3
Fauna detected within the study site
A total of 89 species of fauna were recorded within the site during this survey. Of these 81
species are native and eight species are introduced. These consist of one species of
Decapod Crustacean, no species of fish, five species of amphibians, ten species of reptiles
(of which eight species are lizards and two species are snakes), 61 species of birds (of these
57 are native species and four species are introduced) and 12 species of mammals of which
four species are introduced.
3.4.4
Results of field work conducted within the reserve during this
survey (including Elliot traps, scat analysis, bird population
survey, spotlighting, bat detection, Scout-guard camera
deployment, FEIS assessments and observations).
3.4.4.1
Bird species and population density survey results
TABLE 34: Bird species and population densities detected for each month within 40 Colchester Road,
October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Stubble Quail
Australian Pelican
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Purple Swamphen
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Masked Lapwing
Black-shouldered Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Brown Goshawk
Swamp Harrier
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Oct
2013
Nov
3
2B
2B
2B
4B
16B
4
2B
2B
2B
4B
20B
1
1
10+
20+
6
10+
1
4B
1
1
4B
2
2
Dec
Jan
2014
May
10+
6
3
3
2
2
2
2
4
2
2
3
2
2
3
3
6
2
1
10+
10+
10+
10+
10+
10+
1
10+
10+
5+
4B
3
4
2
4
4
4
1
1
4
3
10+
8
2
4
5
10+
6
3
4B
2
2
2
4
2
1
2
3
4
10+
3
2
3
3
6
3
2
Apr
4B
3B
2B
4B
10+
1
4B
Mar
2B
2B
2B
4B
24
4
2B
Feb
2
2
4
3
15
10+
4
2
4
4B
1
1
1
60+B
60+B
70+B
10+
70+B
50+B
40+B
6B
50+B
30+B
6B
50+B
30+B
6B
60+B
30+B
6B
10+
70+
60+
40+
10+
60+
60+
40+
10+
6
2
2
60+
10+
60+
40+
6
2
60+
10+
60+
40+
5
3
108
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
SPECIES
Oct
2013
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike-thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Mudlark
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
*European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
3.4.4.2
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
4
6
12
4
1
6
6
10
4
8
4
2
6
4
12
2
4
1
6
4
4
4
2
4
4
5
3
6
6
4
5
6
8
3
8
7
6
2
30+
10+
10+
40+
3
10+
2
20+
10+
10+
20+
2
6B
2B
6B
2B
6B
2B
6B
2B
4
10
4
2
4B
2B
4B
2B
4B
2B
4B
2B
6
4
6
4
6B
6B
6B
6B
10+
10+
2
2
4
4
3
6
4
2B
4B
2B
4B
2B
4B
2B
4B
6
10+B
10+B
10+B
3
10+B
10+
3
4
5
12
5
6
12
16
4
6
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
20+
10+
20+
2
30+
10
20+
50+
Elliot trap survey results
TABLE 35: Fauna sampled in Elliot traps deployed through-out 40 Colchester Road, March to April 2014.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Skink
Swamp Rat
17-03-14
16-03-14
16-03-14
17-03-14
16-03-14
16-03-14
17-03-14
1m
2
1
3
1
2
1
*Black Rat
*House Mouse
3.4.4.3
Area detected
Transect 2 trap 7.
Transect 1, traps 4 & 9.
Transect 2, traps 2.
Transect 2 traps 3, 4 & 10.
Transect 1, trap 8.
Transect 1, traps 3 & 5.
Transect 2, trap 1.
Feral predator scat analysis
TABLE 36: Mammal hairs identified in fox and cat scats collected through-out 40 Colchester Road,
November 2013 to April 2014.
Predator Species
scat
Date collected
Non mammal remains
Mammal hairs analyzed within scat
*Fox 1
*Fox 2
*Fox 3
*Cat 1
*Cat 2
28-11-13
22-12-13
02-02-14
02-02-14
12-04-14
Nil
Nil
Berries
Reptile scales
Feathers
Rat sp.
*House Mouse
Common Ringtail Possum
Nil.
Nil.
109
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4.4.4
Spotlight walk results
TABLE 37: Fauna observed during spotlighting throughout 40 Colchester Road, December 2013
to April 2014.
Species
Amphibians
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Birds
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Nankeen Night Heron
Masked Lapwing
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Mammals
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Bat sps
*Fox
*Feral Cat
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
50+
30+
30+
20+
5+
8
50+
10+
10+
20+
10+
10+
Low lying areas.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
14-04-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
3
3
2
2
4
4
4
1
1
1
Reed and scrub patches.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Open area.
As above.
As above.
Scrub patches.
As above
As above.
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
8
10+
10+
1
3
2
3 sps
4 sps
3 sps
1
1
1
2
1
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Flying above.
As above.
As above.
Through-out.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
110
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4.4.5
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
TABLE 38: Micro bats recorded on the Anabat II Bat Detector through-out 40 Colchester Road,
December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Little Forest Bat
3.4.4.6
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
14-04-14
16
21
6
31
25
13
7
23
33
5
Flying above vegetation.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above
Scout-guard camera deployment
Two Scout-guard cameras were deployed within the reserve from 20-03-14 until the 1005-14. Below in the graph are the results recorded from this deployment.
Graph 6 Results of Scout-guard camera deployment within 40 Colchester Road, 20-03-14 to 10-05-14
50
45
40
35
Black Wallaby
30
Echidna
25
WB Scrubwren
20
Swamp Rat
15
*Black Rat
10
5
0
Camera 1
3.4.4.7
Camera 2
Current status of Broad Vegetation Class ecosystems within the
reserve using FEIS rapid assessment tool
After accessing within the reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool, the tables below list
the FEIS’s that still occur and the species which have disappeared within Broad Vegetation
111
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Classes across the site. A score is also given at a rating from 1 to 5 (which relates to which
extinction phase the site is currently experiencing) depending on loss of FEIS’s.
Table 39: FEIS assessment of scrub (wet) within 40 Colchester Road.
Decapod Crustaceans,
Amphibians and
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
Engaeus sps
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Southern Water Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Brush Bronzewing
Eastern Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Southern Emu-wren
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Rufous Fantail
Grey Currawong
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
Dusky Antechinus
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
15 of the 33 FEIS’s have
disappeared from the site.
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have
disappeared from the site
based on this survey.
55% of FEIS’s still remain
which indicates a phase 3
extinction rate within the
scrub through-out the site.
Table 40: FEIS Assessment of BVT, Woodlands within 40 Colchester Road.
Decapod
Crustaceans &
Fish
Engaeus sp
KEY
Red writing
indicates species
that have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the reserve
based on this
survey.
.
Reptiles
Tree Dragon
Whites Skink
Southern Water Skink
Eastern three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
McCoy’s Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
or
Common Blue-tongue
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Painted Button Quail
Buff-banded Rail
Southern Boobook
Powerful Owl
Eastern Rosella
Crimson Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Varied Sitella
White-throated Treecreeper
White-eared Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Crested Shrike-tit
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Rufous Fantail
Grey Fantail
Satin Flycatcher
Grey Currawong
Mistletoebird
Stubble Quail
Brush Bronzewing
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Sugar Glider
Feathertail Glider
Black Wallaby
Sothern Forest Bat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
27 of the 48 FEIS’s have
disappeared from
woodlands within the
reserve.
44% of FEIS’s still remain
which indicates a phase 34 extinction rate within the
woodland sites through-out
the reserve.
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 41: FEIS Assessment of BVT, Wetlands & Swamps within 40 Colchester Road.
Decapod
Crustaceans
& Fish
Amphibians
Engaeus sp
Spotted Galaxias
Dwarf Galaxias
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Growling Grass Frog
KEY
Red writing
indicates species
that have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the site
based on this
survey.
3.4.5
3.4.5.1
Reptiles
Common Long-necked
Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Birds
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Ballions Crake
Spotless Crake
Australasian Bittern
Nankeen Night Heron
Great Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Southern Emu-wren
White-fronted Chat
Clamorous Reed Warbler
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
Mammals
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown
Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Swamp Rat
58% of FEIS’s
still remain
which indicates
a phase 2=3
extinction rate
within the
wetlands
through-out the
site.
Significant fauna of 40 Colchester Road Reserve
Significant fauna detected throughout the reserve during this survey.
Nationally significant species listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act
1999 were not detected during this survey. However three species are listed as
internationally migratory under the EPBC Act. Ten State significant species were recorded
during this study and five species are listed under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988
as threatened. In addition, a further 19 species recorded are considered to be of regional
significance and five species recorded are considered to be of high local significance. The
remaining native fauna utilizing the site are considered to be at a local significance level due
to large population and habitat losses within the local area (Mornington Peninsula Shire).
3.4.5.2
Ecological significance of the study site.
On the basis of significant flora & fauna species and endangered EVC’s occurring within the
site, the reserve can be considered to be of state significance.
3.4.5.3
11 of the 26
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from the
wetlands and
swamps within
the site.
Habitat significance
The vegetation communities within the reserve contain important Tall Marsh and Freshwater
Swamp Scrub EVC habitats for fauna species, especially threatened species at a state level.
The indigenous shrub communities support a medium diversity of arboreal mammals and a
high diversity of avifauna. The terrestrial vegetation supports a medium to high diversity of
terrestrial fauna and scrub-dwelling avifauna. The Tall Marsh EVC supports many
113
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
endangered and threatened bird species along with wetland flora communities. Feral species
(such-as *Feral Cats,*Red Fox and *Black Rat) represent a threat to the fauna diversity. Feral
species are currently being controlled within the nearby public land reserves and nearby
Boneo Park.
3.4.5.4
Defining significant species
Fauna in the study site were classed according to their high local, regional and state
significant levels. As lists of regionally and locally significant fauna aren’t available from
relevant government authorities, those significant taxa were assessed by the author from his
previous records within the bioregion and Mornington Peninsula Shire.
Key to defining significant species
Signif
N
S
R
HL
DSE
FFG
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Cen
End
Vul
LR
NT
DD
Ls
M
Un
MC
LC
C
Lim
Significant/status of species is designated by:
National
State
Regional
High Local
Advisory list of threatened Vertebrate in Victoria-2013 (DSE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guaranteed Act 1988
Action Plan approved by Environmental Australia
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
International Treaties, C=China (CAMBA) and J=Japan (JAMBA).
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
lower risk-near threatened
Near Threatened
data deficient
Listed
Migratory under the EPBC Act
Uncommon
Moderately Common
Locally Common
Common
Limited
TABLE 42: Significant fauna detected throughout 40 Colchester Road during this survey.
Common Name
Amphibians
Southern Toadlet
Reptiles
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Scientific Name
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Sig
DSE.
S
Vul
Bassian duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellina
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Australeps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
R
R
S
R
S
R
R
HL
R
MC
MC
Vul
MC
Vul
MC
MC
C
Un
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
R
S
S
Un
Vul
Vul
FFG.
ActPl
Ls
Yes
Ls
Ls
Yes
Yes
EPBC
114
TR
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Common Name
Scientific Name
Sig
DSE.
Spotless Crake
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Musk Lorikeet
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Crescent Honeyeater
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Mistletoebird
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
Black Wallaby
Micro bats occurring throughout.
Swamp Rat
Porzana tabuensis
Ardea alba
Nycticorax caledonicus hillii
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Aquila audax
Circus approximans
Glossopsitta concinna
Ninox novaehollandiae
Tyto alba
Hirundapus caudacutus
Dacelo novaehollandiae
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Petroica rodinogaster
Eopsaltria australis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Dicaeum hirundinaceum
R
S
S
S
S
HL
HL
HL
R
R
S
HL
R
R
R
R
R
MC
Vul
LR
LR
LR
Un
Un
MC
Un
Un
Vul
Un
MC
Un
Un
Un
Un
Tachyglossus aculeatus
Wallabia bicolor
Tadarida, Chalinolobus &
Vespadelus sps.
Rattus lutreolus
R
R
R
C
MC
C
R
C
FFG.
Ls
ActPl
EPBC
Yes
N
TR
M
CJ
M
CJ
M
CJ
Map 7 below shows the locations of state threatened fauna species which were identified
within the reserve during this survey. Please note that small flocks of internationally
migratory White-throated Needletail were not recorded as landing within the reserve and so
are not recorded on map 7.
This photo shows the important swamp scrub and Tall Marsh EVC habitats within 40 Colchester Road. Photo M. Legg 2014.
115
KEY
Reserve boundaries
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
MAP 7
Locations of State significant fauna species
identified within 40 Colchester Road Reserve
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
116
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4.6
Discussion
3.4.6.1
Indigenous Fauna
3.4.6.1.1
Decapod Crustacean
One species of Decapod Crustacean was identified within the reserve and was found to
inhabit the Freshwater Swamp Scrub and Tall Marsh EVC’s. In these communities typical
mud chimneys were observed on the soils (see photo below). Colonies of burrowing crayfish
appear to be in a healthy condition and are excellent environmental health indicators of the
water table below the surface.
Typical chimney construction of mud at the base of this Engaeus species burrow-entrance within 40 Colchester Road.
Photo M. Legg 2014.
3.4.6.1.2
Amphibians
Medium to high population densities of Common Froglet, Southern Bullfrog, Verreaux’s Tree
Frog and Southern Brown Tree Frog were found to inhabit the inundated areas of the
reserve. The state threatened Southern Toadlet was heard calling in low lying areas such-as
within the Common Reed patches and its population densities are at a medium level.
117
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Rarer species which weren’t sampled during this survey and which are probably extinct
within the site include: Victorian Smooth Froglet, Haswell’s Froglet, Spotted Marsh Frog,
Stripped Marsh Frog and Growling Grass Frog. It is unlikely that future surveys within the
greater area would identify these species.
3.4.6.1.3
Reptiles
Reptile species and diversity appeared to be at a reasonably high level. Population densities
through-out the reserve by contrast are at low to medium levels. Low population densities
are probably due to the large sections of the reserve that becomes inundated during winter
and spring and the highly degraded nature of the raised grasslands. Degradation of the
raised grasslands is associated with recurrent slashing regime by council contractors and
progressive colonization of introduced pasture grasses favored by the slashing. During
recent habitat restoration projects terrestrial habitat logs with small hollows were deployed
along the southern boundary and around the edges of the raised grassland. This has
provided additional habitat and helped to increase reptile habitat and population densities.
However the loss of tussock grasses from the slashing has significantly reduced the quality
and diversity of the EVC South Gippsland Plains Grassland.
Naturally occurring terrestrial habitat trunks were present within old-growth paperbark
patches. These provide homes for some skink species especially the FFG listed Swamp Skink
and state threatened Glossy Grass Skink. Some habitat changing weed species are present
and posing some impacts upon available essential understorey habitat. The reptiles
identified during this survey period and their habitats are discussed below.
Reptiles recorded within the reserve include lizards and snakes. The occasional Eastern
Three-lined Skink was observed either sunning themselves next to grasses or found under
fallen debris. One FFG listed Swamp Skinks was sampled in an Elliot trap and others were
observed sunning themselves at the base of tussocks or on habitat logs. Swamp Skinks
within the reserve appear to be at a low to medium population density. The state threatened
Glossy Grass Skink was observed under fallen debris and under bark which had fallen off the
habitat logs. Populations appear to be at a low density through-out the site. Other small
skinks observed included: Eastern Three-lined Skink, Delicate Skink, Garden Skink, Metallic
Skink and Weasel Skink. All were observed either in the understorey or found under dumped
rubbish, habitat logs and fallen debris. The occasional Blotched Blue-tongue was observed
in grasses and appears to be at a low population density level.
Two snake species were observed during the survey period and include: Lowland
Copperhead and White-lipped Snake. The White-lipped Snake was found under terrestrial
118
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
logs while the copperhead was observed sunning itself next to grass tussocks. Both species
population densities appear to be at a low level.
3.4.6.1.4
Birds
A large diversity of birds inhabits the various habitats found within the reserve and can be
divided into three categories:
x
wetland birds
x
woodland birds
x
Introduced birds
Wetland birds
During this survey wetland bird species identified within the reserve were observed either
flying overhead, found to inhabit the various vegetation communities or observed in the
inundated areas feeding. Wetland birds identified flying overhead include: Australian
Pelican, Australian White Ibis and Straw-necked Ibis.
Wetland birds that were observed either breeding or feeding within the reserve include:
Buff-banded Rail, FFG listed Lewin’s Rail, FFG listed Baillon’s Crake, Spotless Crake, Purple
Swamphen, White-faced Heron, FFG listed Great Egret, Nankeen Night Heron, Royal
Spoonbill, Internationally migratory Latham’s Snipe and Masked Lapwing. Several of these
species are either endangered or threatened at state and regional levels and are important
ecological components of Tootgarook Wetland.
Future habitat restoration projects and removal of habitat changing weeds should be staged
over a few years in order for rail & crake species etc. to be able to adapt and adjust. Weed
species should be replaced with indigenous prickly bushes, grasses and sedges.
Purple Swamphens feeding in the western section of 40 Colchester Road. Photo M. Legg 2013.
119
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Woodland birds
Several species of woodland birds were found to inhabit the woodlands, swamp scrub, reeds
and understorey habitats found through-out the study site and are discussed below.
A small flock of Stubble Quail visited the reserve during mid April and were observed
feeding within grass tussocks.
Birds of prey were regularly observed flying over the road reserve and surrounding
vegetation, while hunting for food or performing courtship displays. They include: Blackshouldered Kite, Wedge-tailed Eagle, Brown Goshawk and Swamp Harrier. All are breeding
residents of Tootgarook Wetland except the Wedge-tailed Eagle which breeds elsewhere.
Occasionally small flocks of Galahs, Cockatoos, Rainbow Lorikeets, Musk Lorikeets and
Eastern Rosellas were observed flying overhead, feeding in the swamp scrub canopies and
within the old solitary Manna Gum along the southern boundary of the reserve.
Migratory birds within Australasia arrived within the reserve during spring and include
Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo, Pink Robin, Grey Fantail, Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, Welcome
Swallow, Clamorous Reed Warbler, Mistletoebird and Silvereye. Majority of the species
mentioned above bred within the reserve and left for northern or eastern Australia during
autumn post breeding. After breeding the Silvereye migrates from Tasmania back to the
mainland especially to the Mornington Peninsula where increase population densities were
observed during late summer and autumn. Within the EVC Tall Marsh communities the
Clamorous Reed Warbler bred within Common Reed patches. The cuckoo is parasitic and
lays its eggs in the nests of honeyeaters, finches, wrens & thornbills and migrates back to
New Guinea after breeding. During mid autumn the occasional Pink Robin was observed in
swamp scrub patches.
During spotlight and day walks the occasional Southern Boobook, Barn Owl and Tawny
Frogmouth were observed either roosting or hunting from swamp scrub patches within the
reserve. All three species did not breed within the reserve.
Small flocks of White-throated Needletail were observed flying overhead and feeding on
insects during summer months. They breed in Korea and migrate to Australia during
summer where they can be observed in aerial flight feeding on insects usually in front of
summer storms.
During April a pair of Laughing Kookaburra was observed stalking prey from the old solitary
Manna Gum found along the southern boundary of the reserve.
120
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Superb Fairy-wren, White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill are common permanent
breeding residents of thickets, undergrowth and canopies within the reserve.
Small flocks of Spotted Pardalote were observed during autumn feeding in the canopies of
the swamp scrub and within the old solitary Manna Gum within the reserve.
Seven species of honeyeaters were recorded throughout the reserve, mainly within the
swamp scrub and woodland areas. These include the Red Wattlebird, Little Wattlebird,
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater, Yellow-faced Honeyeater, Crescent Honeyeater, New Holland
Honeyeater and Eastern Spinebill. All species are either breeding residents or breed nearby
to the reserve.
The Eastern Yellow Robin and Grey Shrike Thrush are breeding resident within the paperbark
thickets and can often be heard calling or observed feeding on insects. A small flock of
Golden Whistler visited the reserve during autumn.
Common open country birds such-as Willy Wagtail, Magpie-lark, Grey Butcherbird,
Australian Magpie, Australian Raven and Little Raven are common to rare visitors or
breeding residents within the reserve.
Occasional flocks of Golden-headed Cisticola and Little Grassbird were observed in exotic
and indigenous grasses or Common Reed sites. During autumn small flocks of Red-browed
Finch were observed feeding along the ground on grass seeds.
Introduced Birds
Four species of introduced birds inhabit the reserve and include: *European Goldfinch,
*Common Blackbird, *Common Starling and *Common Myna. The *European Goldfinch and
*Common Blackbird are breeding residents through-out. The *Common Starling and
*Common Myna are mainly foraging visitors. Large flocks of starlings and mynas were
observed during autumn feeding on blackberry fruit. The *Common Blackbird and *Common
Starling are prolific spreaders of noxious and environmental weed seed.
3.4.6.1.4.1
Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
Results from the graph below indicate that bird species diversity within the reserve was the
lowest (27) during December & January and peaked at 45 species during March and May.
This can be attributed to post breeding period when bird species tend to move around from
breeding sites to other habitat patches adjacent to the reserve or within the greater area.
121
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The table below lists the fluctuations in bird species diversity, within the reserve and during
each month of the survey period.
Graph 7: Fluctuations in bird species diversity within 40 Colchester Road over an eight month period
during this survey.
50
45
40
35
30
25
No of bird species
20
15
10
5
0
Oct
3.4.6.1.5
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Mammals
During this survey a low to medium diversity of mammal species was recorded within the
reserve. Other species that should occur but were found to be absent include: White-footed
Dunnart, Agile Antechinus, Dusky Antechinus, Long-nosed Bandicoot, Southern Brown
Bandicoot, Common Wombat, Eastern Grey Kangaroo and Water Rat. Some of these species
were known to occur within the area over the last three decades. The mammals recorded
during this survey are discussed below.
Monotremes
Occasional Short-beaked Echidna was encountered within the reserve and diggings from
those individuals were regularly encountered. Echidnas are breeding residents within the
greater area whom roam over large areas utilizing most habitats that contain a year-round
supply of sought after termites and ants.
Marsupials
The only nocturnal possum encountered during the survey period was the Common Ringtail
Possum. This species was observed during spotlight walks within the swamp scrub
canopies. Here they were observed or encountered either feeding in the swamp scrub
canopy, heard calling when disturbed and found in dreys which are constructed within the
122
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
swamp scrub thickets. Juveniles of ringtail possums were observed in late summer and
autumn.
During spotlight walks the occasional Black Wallaby was encountered within the reserve,
mainly within swamp scrub patches and scats were also encountered during field work.
Individuals were also filmed on Scout-guard cameras.
Placental Mammals
Three nights of recording micro-bat echolocation calls were conducted throughout this
survey. Micro-bats were seen on warm nights flying past the light beam of a torch, catching
and eating insects while in flight. Future micro-bat recordings could result in further species
identification, as some species are common one month and then absent the next. All
species of micro-bats that occur within the reserve are hollow dependent, nocturnal, and eat
three times their body weight in insects each night. Most species are feeding visitors to the
site and roost or breed elsewhere.
Swamp Rat populations appear to be at a stable level and were regularly sampled in Elliot
traps. Here they occupy dense understory grass patches whether they be indigenous or
weedy and don’t become inundated with water. Underneath this vegetation they excavate
runways and build nest chambers at the end in burrows up to one meter long. Such activity
is apparent throughout their distribution within the reserve. They feed on a variety of
rhizomes, seeds and other various vegetation matters from the local and introduced
graminoids.
3.4.6.1.5.1
Feral mammals
*Red Fox
*Red Fox population densities appear to be low through-out the reserve and surrounding
area which is due to the MPS feral predator control program which has greatly reduced the
fox populations through-out Tootgarook Wetland and surrounding areas. The occasional
fox scat was mainly found in cleared areas through-out the reserve. The MPS feral predator
control program must be extended to include the Colchester Road reserve.
*Feral Cat
During this survey occasional *Feral Cat or their scats were encountered within the reserve.
These cats were probably residents of the adjacent industrial estate and recommendation is
given to expand feral cat control to include the industrial estate.
123
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Feral Rodents
*Black Rat and *House Mouse populations appear to be at a medium level which can
contribute to a decline in populations of terrestrial fauna species and bird species & their
eggs. Both species of introduced rodent were sampled in Elliot traps and probably provide a
food source for predatory bird species. *Black Rat control needs to be adopted within the
reserve which will help secure threatened breeding birds, their eggs and chicks from this
feral menace. Appropriate method of feral rodent control within the reserve includes
deploying cage traps.
*European Rabbit
No *European Rabbits were found to occur within the reserve or surrounding area.
3.4.6.2
Habitat changing weeds
Several habitat changing weed species are present within the reserve and are mainly found
along the edges, within EVC’s Freshwater Swamp Scrub & Tall Marsh patches and within the
raised grasslands. Such weeds are currently changing some aspects of critical fauna habitat
and will cause a decline in the health of the natural ecosystems that occur.
The most serious infestations which are changing indigenous habitats include: * Boneseed,
*Cotoneaster, *Box Thorn, *Cape Ivy, *Apple of Sodom, *Spear Thistle, *Sallow Wattle,
*Coast Tea-tree, *Kikuyu & other weedy grasses and *English Blackberry. Most of the
habitat-changing weed outbreaks have the potential to take over causing large changes and
destruction of essential habitats. Consequently a large reduction in fauna population
densities and species diversity will occur.
Some weed species are also providing habitat for some fauna species such-as rails, wrens
and skinks etc. These should only be removed over an extended period of time and be
replaced with indigenous plant species. Weeds being used as habitat by fauna species must
also be replaced with indigenous terrestrial plants such-as grasses, sedges and shrubs.
The re-establishment of the South Gippsland Plains Grassland EVC is of high importance as
it provides essential habitat for terrestrial fauna species during times of inundation when
surrounding habitat becomes flooded. Under the present MPS management regime annual
slashing is a significant reason for loss of indigenous vegetation cover.
124
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
*Box Thorn & *Cotoneaster have the potential to spread through-out 40 Colchester Road and change vital habitats. Photos M. Legg 2014.
The Gippsland Plains Grassland has been constantly slashed over the years and very little indigenous grass remains at 40 Colchester Road.
Photo M. Legg 2014.
Break-outs of *Apple of Sodom are threatening some habitats within 40 Colchester Road. Photo M. Legg 2014.
125
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4.6.3
Relative importance of key habitats
The reserve is an important section of the northern area of Tootgarook Wetland that still
retains significant vegetation and habitat. The dense reed and swamp scrub habitats
support breeding pairs of state and regionally threatened wetland bird species, while other
species utilize it as foraging sites. Populations of FFG Swamp Skinks and state threatened
Glossy Grass Skink are found to inhabit the swamp scrub and reed beds. The state
threatened Southern Toadlet is also a breeding resident especially in sites that become
inundated during early winter. The reserve is an extremely important site for the future
survival of threatened species within Tootgarook Wetland.
Old stands of Swamp Paperbark and Woolly Tea-tree provide homes for possums and a
variety of bird species while fallen trunks within these patches provides homes for reptiles,
amphibians and insect species. The large patches of EVC Tall Marsh (picture below)
dominated by Common Reed are mainly found within the western half of the reserve and is
an important breeding & feeding site for rails, crakes, night herons, egrets, spoonbills, snipe
and the migratory Clamorous Reed-Warbler. The Tall Marsh is also potential habitat for the
EPBC listed Australasian Bittern. Wetland habitats within the western section provide
foraging habitat for a large density of Purple Swamphens which were observed during
spring.
The old Manna Gum tree on the southern boundary is a remnant of the original woodlands
that occurred in the area. This is a sole survivor within the area and future habitat
restoration projects should include revegetation of this species from seed collected from
this and other nearby remaining specimens. This solitary Manna Gum currently provides
critical habitat for bird species (usually associated with woodlands), possums and microbats.
The old-growth Manna Gum is a remnant of the extensive woodlands This stock pile of habitat logs can be deployed within the raised
which originally occurred east of the reserve within 40 Colchester Road. grassland during habitat restoration projects within 40
Photo M. Legg 2014.
Colchester Road. Photo M. Legg 2014.
126
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
During recent years a joint MPS/MW habitat restoration project was conducted along the
adjacent Hiscock Road Reserve. The project works have created ideal habitat for terrestrial
and semi-terrestrial species. Significant tussock grass planting and placement of terrestrial
hollow baring logs have significantly increase the habitat diversity for several threatened
fauna species such-as the FFG listed Swamp Skink and Glossy Grass Skink. This project
should be extended into the raised grassland of 40 Colchester Road. Future habitat
restoration projects should focus on re-establishment of South Gippsland Plains Grassland
EVC on elevated sites within the reserve. Restoration projects should priorities the
placement of habitat logs (pictured above) through-out the raised grassland areas of this
reserve.
Under the MPS planning scheme this land is currently zoned industrial, which fails to
recognise the role of this land as providing critical habitat for five FFG listed species, ten
state significant species, three endangered EVC’s, one vulnerable EVC and one rare. A
significant recommendation is made for a review of existing planning zone controls to
better recognise the environmental significance identified within this land and the role of
this land within the protection of the greater Tootgarook Wetland.
3.4.6.4
Bio-links from the reserve to surrounding vegetation
The reserve contributes a high conservation value to the greater Tootgarook Wetland and is
important that the habitat of this land has greater physical connectivity with other isolated
remnant habitat of the greater Tootgarook Wetland. The reserve Is a key bio-link between
Hiscock Road Reserve & Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve and also an important bio-link
between Drum Drum Alloc Creek and Chinaman’s Creek.
3.4.6.5
FEIS assessments
During this survey Broad Vegetation Types (BVT) woodlands, scrub (wet) and wetlands &
swamps were assessed within the reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool. This is an
assessment of habitat specific fauna species that quickly disappear when their habitat
changes at a rapid rate. The assessments within the reserve indicated that 44% of FEIS’s
were present within woodlands, 55% of FEIS‟s were present within scrub and 58% within
wetlands & swamps. This indicates a phase 2-4 extinction rate of FEIS’s within BVT’s
assessed within the reserve.
Assessments indicted that large tree hollows (usually associate with eucalypts) are rare and
only found in one old-growth Manna Gum. Terrestrial logs with small hollows are found in
re-vegetated areas and within old-growth swamp scrub patches within the reserve. Ongoing and integrated feral control programs need to continue across the landscape in order
127
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
to maintain and increase fauna species diversity and population densities within Tootgarook
Wetland.
3.4.6.6
Illegal rubbish dumping within the reserve
Field observations collected over many years and for this study reveal the following
unauthorized activities are occurring on this reserve and are as follows:x
Repetitive dumping of garden and building waste.
x
Parking of multiple vehicles on the reserve associated with business in the adjoining
industrial estate.
The following recommendation are made to council;x
To more strongly enforce Planning Scheme and Local Law controls to prevent
unauthorised use and dumping on the reserve including maintenance of a secure
perimeter fence
x
Care should be taken prior to the removal of dumped hard waste to ensure reptiles
and other native species are protected during removal works.
x
MPS fuel reduction works along the perimeter of the land and the adjoining
industrial estate should include the control of habitat changing weed species as
indicated in section 3.4.6.2 of this report.
The photos above show Illegal rubbish dumping and car parking within 40 Colchester Road. Photos M. Legg 2014.
3.4.6.7
Monitoring FEIS’s and population densities within the reserve
A monitoring program within the reserve for FEIS species, including threatened species
(found to be present) needs to be developed to measure fluctuations in population densities
and loss of species. Such species considered for future monitoring projects are listed in
tables 39, 40 & 41 of this report.
128
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.4.7
Recommendations for 40 Colchester Road
The following management recommendations are set out to help the study site’s managers
to manage the fauna and habitat more appropriately in accordance with flora and fauna
requirements.
x
Continue to conduct fauna surveys every five years and carry out yearly
monitoring of FEIS’s, threatened indigenous fauna species and feral species
using Scout-guard cameras and analysing fox scats.
x
Rezone the land from industrial to a zone that better protects significant
conservation values.
x
Recommendations for fauna species contained in Action Plans and Recovery
Plans under the FFG Act 1988 be sought to be implemented within the
reserve.
x
Weed management should be staged over several years to enable fauna
currently dependant on weed species to be able to utilise indigenous species.
x
Urgently modify the existing slashing regime of the South Gippsland Plains
Grassland EVC and revegetate using poas and sedges.
x
Deploy habitat logs within the raised grassland.
x
Avoid herbicide spraying in known Southern Toadlet habitat.
x
Before removal of dumped rubbish quarantine and search for hibernating
reptiles. If found release reptiles onsite preferably amongst revegetated sites
with habitat logs.
x
Include the reserve in the MPS feral control programs and focus on *Red Fox,
*Feral Cat and *Black Rat.
x
Council as the managers of the reserve should develop and install signage
interpreting the environmental, cultural and hydro-geological functions of
the land parcel at a prominent location possibly at the Colchester Road
entrance.
Management actions should include the following and during weeding projects follow these
simple rules:
o
Conduct weeding in sections and span the process over five or so
years. Start from the good areas and work outwards and control
invading weeds on the edges.
129
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
o
Only remove woody weeds or conduct control burns during the nonbird breeding season.
o
Leave if Eastern Yellow Robins or other birds are nesting.
o
Allow natural regeneration to occur.
o
Ringtail possum dreys and native bird nests must be protected in
association with weed control works.
130
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5 Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
3.5.1
Study site
The reserve is located in West Rosebud and is a significant conservation reserve of the
Tootgarook Wetland. The reserve is located at the end of Elizabeth Avenue and is
approximately 11.27 hectares in size. Its location is Melways reference number 169 H6. The
site comprises swamp scrub, wetlands, and grasslands. Chinaman’s Creek runs along the
western boundary of the reserve.
3.5.2 Ecological Vegetation Classes
Five Ecological Vegetation classes (EVC’s) are present within the reserve and includes EVC’s
(053) Freshwater Swamp Scrub, (132) South Gippsland Plains Grassland, (653) Aquatic
Herbland, (656) Brackish Wetland and (821) Tall Marsh. Other EVC’s are probably apparent
but have not been mapped at present. The diversity of EVC’s constitutes different habitat
types which provide homes for a high diversity of fauna species. Majority of these EVC’s are
of high quality apart from South Gippsland Plains Grassland and parts of Freshwater Swamp
Scrub. These two EVC’s have infestations of habitat changing weeds and pasture grasses.
The EVC’s that have been determined within the reserve and their status are displayed in the
table below.
Table 43: EVC’s present within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve.
EVC No
EVC’s
Status within Gippsland
Plain Bioregion
053
132
653
656
821
Freshwater Swamp Scrub
South Gippsland Plains Grassland
Aquatic Herbland
Brackish Wetland
Tall Marsh
Endangered
Endangered
Endangered
Rare
No listing
3.5.3
Fauna detected within the reserve
A total of 122 species of fauna were recorded within the study site during this survey. Of
these 112 species are native and ten species are introduced. These consist of one species
of Decapod Crustacean, five species of fish (of which one species is introduced), six species
of amphibians, 14 species of reptiles (of which one species is a tortoise, ten species are
lizards and three species are snakes), 81 species of birds (of these 76 are native species and
five species are introduced) and 15 species of mammals of which four species are
introduced.
131
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.4
Results of field work conducted within the reserve during this survey
(including scat analysis, bird population surveys, bait traps, Elliot
traps, Scout-guard cameras, spotlighting, bat detection, FEIS
assessments and observations).
3.5.4.1
Fish sampling results
TABLE 44: Fish sampled in bait traps deployed in Chinaman’s Creek, February 2014.
Species
Date
Short-finned Eel
Common Galaxias
11-01-14
11-01-14
12-01-14
11-01-14
12-01-14
12-01-14
11-01-14
12-01-14
Spotted Galaxias
Tupong
*Mosquitofish
3.5.4.2
Number
sampled
11
40+
50+
4
2
1
100+
100+
Area sampled
Chinaman’s Creek.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Bird species and population density survey results
TABLE 45: Bird species and population densities detected for each month at Sanctuary Park Bushland
Reserve. October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Stubble Quail
Australian Pelican
Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Chestnut Teal
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Ballion’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Dusky Moorhen
Purple Swamphen
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Masked Lapwing
Silver Gull
Pacific Gull
Black-shouldered Kite
Whistling Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Brown Goshawk
Collared Sparrowhawk
Swamp Harrier
Peregrine Falcon
Nankeen Kestrel
Oct
2013
2
4
10+
60+
4B
4B
2B
6B
4B
2
8
3
2B
Nov
Dec
4
1
1
6
10+
70+
4B
4B
2B
6B
3
20+
50+
4B
4B
2B
6B
4B
4
1
11B
2
1
2B
6
10+
2
2B
10+
8
2
2B
4
2B
6
4B
2B
6B
4
12
3
23
6
6
4B
4
2ad2ju
1
2
Mar
Apr
May
12
7
3
4
2
5
4
8
2
3
2
4
3
7
18
2
2
Feb
1
6
2
1
Jan
2014
2ad 2ju
2ad 2ju
6
6
3
8
4
12
4
6
2
6
4
12
2
2
100+
9
2
6
4
2
1
2
4
2
2
2
2ad 2ju
1
20+
10+
10+
6
8
3
4
4
4
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2ad 2ju
132
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
SPECIES
*Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo
Shining Bronze-Cuckoo
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Pink Robin
Flame Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike-thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Black-faced Cuckoo Shrike
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
*European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
3.5.4.3
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
4B
4B
4B
4
6B
3
6
4
3
10+
2
4
6
5
6
30+
20+
2
6
4
5
10+
20+
3
5
5
3
10+
10+
4
2B
4B
2B
4B
1
1
2
2B
70+
10+
70+
50+
60+
10+
60+
40+
6
4
6
6
12
12
4
3
4
6
10
8
60+
10+
60+
40+
10+
6
2
6
5
8
7
1
2
2
2
2
2
80+B
100+B
100+B
10+
70+B
10+
70+
80+B
60+B
100+B
75+B
100+B
50+B
70+B
40+B
70+
40+
4B
4B
4
4B
8B
6
4
20B
6B
22B
6B
16B
6B
12B
8B
2
10+
12
4
2
6B
4B
6B
4B
6B
4B
8B
4B
10+
6
10+
6
8
6
20+B
40+B
20+B
12
10+
4B
4B
4B
4B
2B
2B
2B
2B
6
2
4
2
2
6
4
6
3
10B
10B
10B
5+
15B
4
11
10B
12B
5+
12B
12
10+
5+
12B
4B
2
4
4
11
6
10+
16
4
2
10+
30+B
10+B
6B
10+B
30+B
10+B
6B
10+B
30+B
12B
12B
10+B
50+B
18B
14B
10+B
2
150+
16
10+
10+
6
2
6
4
4
4
3
9
10+
10+
6
4
10+
10+
4
50+
10+
10+
10+
8B
10B
2
3
8
6
4
4
2
4
2
5
6
8
2
8
6
10+
10+
2
20+
10+
8
10+
10+
10+
1
20+
10+
4
10+
Elliot trap survey results
TABLE 46: Fauna sampled in Elliot traps deployed through-out Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve,
March to April 2014.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Skink
17-02-14
18-02-14
20-02-14
1m
2f
1f
Area detected
Transect 1 trap 3.
Transect 2, traps 5 & 7.
Transect 1, trap 9.
133
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Rat
16-02-14
16-02-14
17-02-14
19-02-14
16-02-14
20-02-14
18-02-14
20-02-14
2
1
3
2
1
1
2
3
*Black Rat
*House Mouse
3.5.4.4
Area detected
Transect 1, traps 4 & 8.
Transect 2, traps 4.
Transect 2, traps 1, 6 & 8.
Transect 1, trap 10.
Transect 1, trap 7.
Transect 2, trap 2.
Transect 1, traps 8 & 9.
Transect 2, trap 3 & 4.
Feral predator scat analysis
TABLE 47: Mammal hairs identified in fox and cat scats collected through-out Sanctuary Park Bushland
Reserve, November 2013 to April 2014.
Predator Species
scat
*Fox 1
*Fox 2
*Fox 2
*Fox 4
*Cat 1
3.5.4.5
Date collected
02/02/14
02/02/14
18/03/14
12/04/14
22/12/13
Non mammal remains
Mammal hairs analyzed within scat
Nil
Nil
Berries
Insects and berries
*House Mouse
Common Ringtail Possum.
Rat sp.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Spotlight walk results
TABLE 48: Fauna observed during spotlighting throughout Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve,
December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
Amphibians
Common Froglet
Haswell’s Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Birds
Masked Lapwing
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
100+
20+
30+
10+
10+
10+
20+
50+
10+
10+
20+
10+
10+
Wet areas.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
18-12-13
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
2
4
1
2
1
2
2
1
Grasslands.
As above.
Scrub
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
134
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Mammals
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Bat sps
*Fox
*Feral Cat
3.5.4.6
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
1
3
1
12
8
10+
3
4
5
3 sps
5 sps.
3 sps.
1
1
1
1
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Through-out.
As above.
As above.
Flying above reserve.
As above.
As above.
Through-out.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
TABLE 49: Micro bats recorded on the Anabat II Bat Detector through-out Sanctuary Park Bushland
Reserve, December 2013 to March 2014.
Species
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Large Forest Bat
Little Forest Bat
3.5.4.7
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
13-02-14
18-12-13
13-02-14
28-04-14
13-02-14
7
24
11
21
37
25
5
11
14
8
9
Flying through-out reserve.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Scout-guard camera deployment
Two cameras were deployed within the reserve and were deployed from 23-12-13 until the
11-04-14. Below in the graph are the results recorded from this deployment.
135
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Graph 8 Results of Scout-guard camera deployment within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve,
23-12-13 to 11-04-14
45
40
35
30
25
Black Wallaby
20
Swamp Rat
15
Nothing
10
5
0
Camera 1
3.5.4.8
Camera 2
Current status of Broad Vegetation Class ecosystems within the
reserve using FEIS rapid assessment tool
After accessing within the reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool, the tables below list
the FEIS’s that still occur and the species which have disappeared within Broad Vegetation
Classes across the site. A score is also given at a rating from 1 to 5 (which relates to which
extinction phase the site is currently experiencing) depending on loss of FEIS’s.
Table 50: FEIS Assessment of BVT: Grasslands within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve.
Reptiles
Tree Dragon
Whites Skink
Swamp Skink
Eastern three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
or
Common Blue-tongue
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Stubble Quail
Painted Button Quail
Buff-banded Rail
Southern Emu-wren
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Swamp Rat
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
6 of the 22 FEIS’s have
disappeared from
grasslands within the
reserve.
73% of FEIS’s still
remain which indicates a
phase 2 extinction rate
within the Grasslands
through-out Sanctuary
Park Bushland Reserve.
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have either
disappeared or become
extinct within the reserve
based on this survey.
136
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 51:
FEIS assessment of scrub (wet) within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve.
Decapod Crustaceans,
Amphibians and
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
Engaeus sps
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Southern Water Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Brush Bronzewing
Eastern Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Southern Emu-wren
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Rufous Fantail
Grey Currawong
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
Dusky Antechinus
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
13 of the 33 FEIS’s
have disappeared from
the site.
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have
disappeared from the site
based on this survey.
Table 52:
61% of FEIS’s still
remain which indicates
a phase 2 extinction
rate within the scrub
through-out the site.
FEIS Assessment of BVT: Wetlands & Swamps within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve.
Decapod
Crustaceans
& Fish
Amphibians
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
Engaeus sp
Spotted Galaxias
Dwarf Galaxias
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Growling Grass Frog
Common Longnecked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Ballions Crake
Spotless Crake
Australasian Bittern
Nankeen Night Heron
Great Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Southern Emu-wren
White-fronted Chat
Clamorous Reed Warbler
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Swamp Rat
7 of the 26
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from the
wetlands and
swamps within
Sanctuary Park.
KEY
Red writing
indicates species
that have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the
reserve based
on this survey.
73% of FEIS’s
still remain which
indicates a
phase
2 extinction rate
within the
wetlands and
swamps
through-out
Sanctuary Park
Bush land
Reserve.
137
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.5
3.5.5.1
Significant fauna of Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
Significant fauna detected throughout the reserve during this survey.
One Nationally significant species the Australasian Bittern which is listed under the
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 was detected during this survey. Three
species are listed as internationally migratory under the EPBC Act. 15 State significant
species were recorded during this study. One species has been nominated and six species
are listed under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 as threatened. In addition, a
further 24 species recorded are considered to be of regional significance and seven species
recorded are considered to be of high local significance. The remaining native fauna
utilizing the site are considered to be at a local significance level due to large population
and habitat losses within the local area (Mornington Peninsula Shire).
3.5.5.2
Ecological significance of the study site.
The site and surrounding area contains extensive critical habitat including possible breeding
sites for a number of species including the EPBC listed endangered Australasian Bittern
which was recorded during this survey. The site also provides breeding habitat for state
threatened species such-as Southern Toadlet, FFG listed Swamp Skink, Glossy Grass Skink,
Lewin’s Rail (FFG listed), Baillon’s Crake (FFG listed) and Royal Spoonbill etc.
On the basis of significant flora & fauna species and endangered EVC’s occurring within the
site, the reserve can be considered to be of state to national significance.
3.5.5.3
Habitat significance
The vegetation communities within the reserve contain important habitat for threatened
fauna species of national, state and regional significance. The indigenous swamp shrub
communities support a medium diversity of arboreal mammals and a high diversity of
avifauna. The terrestrial vegetation supports a high diversity of terrestrial fauna and scrubdwelling avifauna. The EVC Tall Marsh and other wetland vegetation support many
endangered and threatened bird species such-as the EPBC listed Australasian Bittern along
with endangered wetland flora communities. Some feral species (such-as Feral Cats,*Red
Fox and *Black Rat) are threatening some of the fauna diversity within the site and are
currently being controlled within the surrounding area.
138
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.5.4
Defining significant species
Fauna in the site were classed according to their high local, regional, state and national
significant levels. As lists of regionally and locally significant fauna aren’t available from
relevant government authorities, those significant taxa were assessed by the author from his
previous records within the bioregion and Mornington Peninsula Shire.
Key to defining significant species
Signif
N
S
R
HL
DSE
FFG
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Cen
End
Vul
LR
NT
DD
Ls
M
Un
MC
LC
C
Lim
Significant/status of species is designated by:
National
State
Regional
High Local
Advisory list of threatened Vertebrate in Victoria-2013 (DSE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guaranteed Act 1988
Action Plan approved by Environmental Australia
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
International Treaties, C=China (CAMBA) and J=Japan (JAMBA).
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
lower risk-near threatened
Near Threatened
data deficient
Listed
Migratory under the EPBC Act
Uncommon
Moderately Common
Locally Common
Common
Limited
TABLE 53: Significant fauna detected throughout Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve during this survey.
Common Name
Fish
Spotted Galaxias
Amphibians
Southern Toadlet
Reptiles
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Pied Cormorant
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Great Egret
Scientific Name
Sig
DSE.
Galaxias truttaceus
R
MC
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
S
Vul
Chelodinia longicollis
Bassian duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellina
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Australeps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
S
R
R
S
R
R
S
R
R
HL
R
DD
MC
MC
Vul
MC
Un
Vul
MC
MC
C
Un
Phalacrocorax varius
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Porzanatabuensis
Ardea alba
S
R
S
S
R
S
LR
Un
Vul
Vul
MC
Vul
FFG.
ActPl
Ls
Yes
Ls
Ls
Yes
Yes
Ls
Yes
EPBC
M
139
TR
CJ
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Common Name
Scientific Name
Sig
DSE.
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Pacific Gull
Whistling Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Peregrine Falcon
Musk Lorikeet
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Yellow Thornbill
Crescent Honeyeater
Pink Robin
Flame Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Mistletoebird
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
White-footed Dunnart
Black Wallaby
Micro bats occurring throughout.
Swamp Rat
Nycticorax caledonicus hillii
Botaurus poiciloptilus
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Larus pacificus
Haliastur sphenurus
Aquila audax
Accipiter cirrhocephalus
Circus assimilis
Circus approximans
Falco peregrinus
Glossopsitta concinna
Ninox novaehollandiae
Tyto alba
Hirundapus caudacutus
Dacelo novaehollandiae
Acanthiza nana
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Petroica rodinogaster
Petroica phoenicea
Eopsaltria australis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Dicaeum hirundinaceum
S
N
S
S
S
HL
HL
R
S
HL
HL
HL
R
R
S
HL
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
LR
En
LR
LR
LR
MC
Un
Un
LR
MC
MC
MC
Un
Un
Vul
Un
Un
MC
Un
Un
Un
Un
Un
Tachyglossus aculeatus
Sminthopsis leucopus
Wallabia bicolor
Tadarida, Chalinolobus &
Vespadelus sps.
Rattus lutreolus
R
S
R
R
C
LR
MC
C
R
C
FFG.
Ls
ActPl
EPBC
Yes
En
N
Ls
TR
M
CJ
M
CJ
Yes
Map 8 below shows the locations of state and nationally threatened fauna species which
were identified within the reserve during this survey. Please note that the Pied Cormorant
and small flocks of Pacific Gull & White-throated Needletail were observed flying over the
reserve and didn’t land within. This means they do not appear on map 8.
Several threatened fauna species utilize the South Gippsland Plains Grassland and scrub patches at Sanctuary Park. Photo M. Legg 2014.
140
Locations of State significant fauna species identified within
Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
MAP 8
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
KEY
Reserve boundaries
Southern Toadlet
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Spotted Harrier
141
White-footed Dunnart
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.6
Discussion
3.5.6.1
Indigenous Fauna
3.5.6.1.1
Decapod Crustacean
Through-out the scrub patches and other low-lying sites of the reserve, one species of
Decapod Crustacean was identified and appears to be in a healthy population condition. In
these communities typical mud chimneys were observed on the soil surface (see photo
below). Colonies of burrowing crayfish are excellent environmental health indicators of the
water table below the surface.
Typical chimney construction of mud at the base of this Engaeus species burrow-entrance at Sanctuary Park. Photos M. Legg 2014.
3.5.6.1.2
Fish
Four species of indigenous fish the Short-fined Eel, Common Galaxias, Spotted Galaxias,
Tupong and the introduced *Mosquitofish were found to inhabit Chinaman’s Creek which
flows along the western boundary of the reserve. All species of fish were sampled in bait
traps and were found to be in a healthy condition. All species of native fish are known to be
quite common within Chinaman’s Creek.
142
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The *Mosquitofish was found to be abundant through-out the creek and probably cause
adverse impacts upon native fish, their eggs and other aquatic fauna species. The
Mosquitofish and other species provide a large food source for tortoises and wetland bird
species especially diving and wading birds.
3.5.6.1.3
Amphibians
High population densities of Common Froglet, Southern Bullfrog, Verreaux’s Tree Frog and
Southern Brown Tree Frog were found to inhabit the inundated areas of the reserve. All
appear to have healthy populations with population densities varying from medium to high
density levels.
During mid autumn the state threatened Southern Toadlet was heard calling in low lying
areas and its population densities appear to be at a medium level.
During December 2013 the small Haswell’s Froglet was identified within the reserve mainly
from the edges of the raised grassland. The population densities of this species appear to
be at a low level.
Rarer species which weren’t sampled during this survey and are probably extinct within the
reserve include: Victorian Smooth Froglet, Spotted Marsh Frog, Stripped Marsh Frog and
Growling Grass Frog. It is unlikely that future surveys within the greater area would identify
these species.
3.5.6.1.4
Reptiles
Through-out the reserve reptile species and population densities appeared to be at a
reasonably high diversity and at a medium population density level. Population densities
probably fluctuate due to large areas of the reserve which become inundated during winter
and spring. The raised grassland within the centre of the reserve (which is private property)
becomes important refuge for reptile species during inundation phases as this acts as a dry
island. During recent habitat restoration projects terrestrial logs with small hollows have
been deployed in some sections of the reserve, where Swamp Skinks and other reptiles have
taken up residency. This has provided additional habitat and helped to increase reptile
population densities.
Other terrestrial trunks were present within old-growth paperbark patches. These provide
homes for some skink species especially the state threatened Swamp and Glossy Grass
143
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Skinks. Some habitat changing weed species are present within these patches and posing
some impacts upon available essential understorey habitat.
The reptiles identified during this survey period and their habitats are discussed below.
Reptiles identified within the reserve include a species of tortoise, lizards and snakes. The
occasional Common Long-necked Tortoise was observed in flooded sites, the creek and one
was observed walking across the raised grassland (see photo below). Population densities
appear to be stable within the reserve.
This Common Long-necked Tortoise was photographed walking across the raised grassland at Sanctuary Park. Photo M. Legg 2014.
Along the northern boundary the Eastern Three-lined Skink was mainly observed. Here they
were observed either sunning themselves next to grasses or found under fallen debris.
In the north-western section of the reserve the FFG listed Swamp Skink appears to be at a
reasonably high population density level, where-as through-out the rest of the reserve they
appear to be at a low population density level. Four Swamp Skinks were sampled in Elliot
traps and others were observed sunning themselves at the base of tussocks or on fallen
timber & habitat logs.
144
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Through-out the reserve especially on the edges of the raised grasslands, the state
threatened Glossy Grass Skink was observed under fallen debris & grasses. Population
densities appear to be at a low density through-out the site.
Other small skinks observed through-out the reserve included: Delicate Skink, Garden
Skink, Metallic Skink, Southern Grass Skink and Weasel Skink. All were observed either in the
understorey, or found on or under logs and fallen debris. The occasional Blotched &
Common Blue-tongues were observed through-out the raised grassland and both species
appear to be at a medium population density level.
Three species of snake were observed during the survey period, mainly within the raised
grassland or in vegetation adjacent. These include: Lowland Copperhead, White-lipped
Snake and Tiger Snake. The White-lipped Snake was found under terrestrial logs while the
copperhead & Tiger Snake were observed sunning themselves next to grass tussocks or
found under tin & logs. All three species population density levels appear to be at a lowmedium level.
Common Blue-tongue photographed at Sanctuary Park within the raised grassland of the reserve. Photo M. Legg 2013.
3.5.6.1.5
Birds
Through-out the reserve a large diversity of bird species inhabits the various habitats and
can be divided into three categories:
x
wetland birds
x
woodland birds
x
Introduced birds
145
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Wetland birds
During this survey several species of wetland birds were either identified within the different
habitats of the reserve or observed flying overhead on their way to other parts of
Tootgarook Wetland. Wetland birds identified flying overhead include: Australian Pelican,
Pied Cormorant, Australian White Ibis, Straw-necked Ibis, Silver Gull and Pacific Gull.
Wetland birds that were observed either breeding or feeding within the reserve include:
Great Cormorant, Black Swan, Buff-banded Rail, FFG listed Lewin’s Rail, FFG listed Baillon’s
Crake, Spotless Crake, Dusky Moorhen, Purple Swamphen, White-faced Heron, FFG listed
Great Egret, Nankeen Night Heron, EPBC listed Australasian Bittern, Royal Spoonbill,
internationally migratory Latham’s Snipe and Masked Lapwing. Several of these species are
either endangered or threatened at national, state and regional levels and are important
ecological components of the greater Tootgarook Wetland.
The Australasian Bittern is believed to be breeding near the western boundary of the reserve
and is now listed as endangered on the national EPBC Act. Full protection must be issued to
this species and an urgent monitoring program must be introduced.
An Australasian Bittern picture here flying out of the western boundary of Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve. Photo Cameron Brown 2014.
Future habitat restoration projects and removal of habitat changing weeds should be staged
over a few years in order for rail & crake species etc. to be able to adapt and adjust. The
raised grassland should be restored back to its important beauty as it acts as an island
refuge during inundated times. Weeds in this area should be replaced with indigenous
grasses and sedges.
146
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Royal Spoonbill with breeding plumage and White-faced Heron feeding on the western end of Sanctuary Park. Photos M. Legg 2013.
Woodland birds
Through-out the reserve several species of woodland birds were found to inhabit the swamp
scrub patches, reeds, grasslands and understorey habitats. These species are discussed
below.
A medium-sized flock of Stubble Quail visited the reserve during mid April and were
observed feeding within the raised grasslands.
Birds of prey were regularly observed flying over the reserve while hunting for food or
performing courtship displays and hunting from or roosting in the swamp scrub patches.
They include: Black-shouldered Kite, Whistling Kite, Wedge-tailed Eagle, Brown Goshawk,
Collared Sparrowhawk, Swamp Harrier, Peregrine Falcon and Nankeen Kestrel. All are
breeding residents of Tootgarook Wetland except the Wedge-tailed Eagle and Peregrine
Falcon which breed elsewhere.
Occasionally small flocks of Galahs, Sulphur-crested Cockatoos, Rainbow Lorikeets, Musk
Lorikeets and Eastern Rosellas were observed flying overhead or observed feeding in the
swamp scrub canopies. All species bred elsewhere.
Migratory birds within Australasia arrived within the reserve during spring & autumn and
include Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo, Shining Bronze-Cuckoo, Yellow Thornbill, Pink Robin,
Flame Robin, Grey Fantail, Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, Welcome Swallow, Clamorous Reed
Warbler, Mistletoebird and Silvereye. Majority of the species mentioned above bred within
147
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
the reserve and left for northern or eastern Australia during autumn post breeding. After
breeding the Silvereye migrates from Tasmania back to the mainland especially to the
Mornington Peninsula Shire where increase population densities were observed during late
summer and autumn. Within the EVC Tall Marsh communities the Clamorous Reed Warbler
breeds within Common Reed patches. The cuckoos are parasitic and lay their eggs in the
nests of honeyeaters, finches, wrens & thornbills and migrate to New Guinea after breeding.
During mid autumn the occasional Pink Robin and Flame Robin was observed on the edges
of swamp scrub patches.
During spotlight and day walks occasional Southern Boobook, Barn Owl and Tawny
Frogmouth were observed either roosting or hunting from swamp scrub patches within the
reserve. All three species did not breed within the reserve but bred nearby.
Small flocks of White-throated Needletail were observed flying overhead and feeding on
insects during summer months. They breed in Korea and migrate to Australia during
summer where they can be observed in aerial flight feeding on insects usually in front of
summer storms.
A Southern Boobook picture here roosting in a swamp scrub patch within Sanctuary Park. Photo Cameron Brown 2014.
During April a pair of Laughing Kookaburra was observed stalking prey from swamp scrub
patches along the southern boundary of the reserve.
Superb Fairy-wren, White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill are common permanent
breeding residents of swamp scrub thickets, undergrowth and canopies within the reserve.
148
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Small flocks of Spotted Pardalote were observed during autumn feeding in the canopies of
the swamp scrub within the reserve.
Seven species of honeyeaters were recorded throughout the reserve, mainly within the
swamp scrub patches. These include the Red Wattlebird, Little Wattlebird, Spiny-cheeked
Honeyeater, Yellow-faced Honeyeater, Crescent Honeyeater, New Holland Honeyeater and
Eastern Spinebill. All species are either breeding residents or bred nearby to the reserve.
The Eastern Yellow Robin and Grey Shrike Thrush are breeding resident within the swamp
scrub thickets of the reserve and can often be heard calling or observed feeding on insects.
The Grey Shrike Thrush prefers old growth swamp scrub stands as they need half a hollow
to nest in.
Common open country birds such-as Willy Wagtail, Magpie-lark, Grey Butcherbird,
Australian Magpie, Australian Raven and Little Raven are common to rare visitors or
breeding residents within the reserve.
Occasional flocks of Golden-headed Cisticola and Little Grassbird were observed in grassy
or Common Reed sites where both species bred. During autumn small flocks of Red-browed
Finch were observed feeding within the raised grassland on grass seeds.
Introduced Birds
Five species of introduced birds inhabit the reserve and include: *Spotted Turtle-Dove,
*European Goldfinch, *Common Blackbird, *Common Starling and *Common Myna. The
*Spotted Turtle-Dove was mainly encountered along the northern boundary in association
with the urban housing. *European Goldfinch and *Common Blackbird are breeding
residents through-out. The *Common Starling and *Common Myna are mainly foraging
visitors. Large flocks of starlings and mynas were observed during autumn feeding on
blackberry fruit. The *Common Blackbird and *Common Starling are prolific spreaders of
noxious and environmental weed seed.
3.5.6.1.5.1
Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
Results from the graph below indicate that bird species diversity within the reserve was the
lowest (36) during October and peaked at 57 species during February. This can be attributed
to post breeding period when bird species tend to move around from breeding sites to other
habitat patches adjacent to the reserve or within the greater area. The table below lists the
fluctuations in bird species diversity within the reserve and during each month of the survey.
149
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Graph 9: Fluctuations in bird species diversity within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve over an eight
month period during this survey.
60
50
40
30
No of bird species
20
10
0
Oct
3.5.6.1.6
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Mammals
During this survey a low to medium diversity of mammal species was recorded within the
reserve. Other species that should occur but were found to be absent include: White-footed
Dunnart, Agile Antechinus, Dusky Antechinus, Long-nosed Bandicoot, Southern Brown
Bandicoot, Common Wombat, Eastern Grey Kangaroo and Water Rat. Some of these species
were known to occur within the area over the last three decades. The mammals recorded
during this survey are discussed below.
Monotremes
Occasional Short-beaked Echidna was encountered within the reserve and diggings from
those individuals were regularly encountered. Echidnas are breeding residents within the
reserve and greater area whom roam over large areas utilizing most habitats that contain a
year-round supply of sought-after termites and ants.
Marsupials
A White-footed Dunnart survey was deployed in September 2006 where one male was
sampled in a pitfall trap. This survey concluded that White-footed Dunnarts still occupy the
raised grasslands within the reserve and surrounding areas. During this survey one
specimen was found under a piece of tin but escaped before sexing was identified.
150
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Nocturnal possums encountered during the survey period were the Common Brushtail
Possum and Common Ringtail Possum. The brushtail possum was encountered in small
numbers mainly along the northern boundary of the reserve. Several ringtail possums were
observed during spotlight walks, mainly within the swamp scrub canopies. Here they were
observed or encountered either feeding in the swamp scrub canopy, heard calling when
disturbed and found in dreys which are constructed within the swamp scrub thickets.
Juveniles of ringtail possums were observed in autumn.
During spotlight walks the occasional Black Wallaby was encountered within the reserve and
scats were also encountered during field work. Within the reserve they rest in the swamp
scrub thickets during the day and venture out into the raised grasslands after dusk to
browse on the various flora species that occurs. Individuals were also filmed on Scout-guard
cameras and one female was filmed with her joey. Such footage is rare and indicates that the
Black Wallaby are breeding residents of the reserve and surrounding area.
Placental Mammals
Three nights of recording micro-bat echolocation calls were conducted throughout this
survey. Micro-bats were seen on warm nights flying past the light beam of a torch, catching
and eating insects while in flight. Future micro-bat recordings could result in further species
identification, as some species are common one month and then absent the next. All
species of micro-bats that occur within the reserve are hollow dependent, nocturnal, and eat
three times their body weight in insects each night. Most species are feeding visitors to the
site and roost or breed elsewhere.
Swamp Rat populations appear to be at a stable level and were regularly sampled in Elliot
traps. Here they occupy the raised grasslands and edges of inundated areas whether they be
indigenous or weedy and don’t become inundated with water. Underneath this vegetation
they excavate runways and build nest chambers at the end in burrows up to one meter long.
Such activity is apparent throughout their distribution within the reserve. They feed on a
variety of rhizomes, seeds and other various vegetation matters from the local and
introduced graminoids.
3.5.6.1.6.1
Feral mammals
*Red Fox
*Red Fox population densities appear to be low through-out the reserve and surrounding
area which is due to the MPS feral predator control program which has greatly reduced the
fox populations through-out Tootgarook Wetland and surrounding areas. The occasional
fox scat was mainly found in cleared areas through-out the reserve. The MPS feral predator
151
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
control program should include the reserve as part of its feral control program. Appropriate
method of fox control within the reserve includes deploying foothold traps.
*Feral Cat
Occasional *Feral Cat or their scats were encountered within the reserve and their
population densities appear to be at a low level. These cats were probably residents of the
adjacent industrial and urban estates. *Feral Cats cause large-scale destruction of lizard and
small bird populations and need urgent control. The MPS feral predator control program
should include the reserve as part of its feral control program to help eliminate *Feral Cats
within the reserve and surrounding estates. Appropriate method of *Feral Cat control within
the reserve includes deploying cage traps.
Feral Rodents
*Black Rat and *House Mouse populations appear to be at a medium level which can
contribute to a decline in populations of terrestrial fauna species and bird species & their
eggs. Both species of introduced rodent were sampled in Elliot traps and probably provide a
food source for predatory bird species (especially birds of prey and owls). *Black Rat control
needs to be adopted within the reserve which will help secure threatened breeding birds,
their eggs and chicks from this feral menace. Appropriate method of feral rodent control
within the reserve includes deploying cage traps.
*European Rabbit
No *European Rabbits were found to occur within the reserve or surrounding area.
3.5.6.2
Habitat changing weeds
Small to medium out-breaks of habitat changing weed species are occurring within the
reserve and are mainly found along the edges, within swamp scrub patches and within the
raised grasslands. Such weeds are currently changing some aspects of critical fauna habitat
and over time will cause a decline in the health of the natural ecosystems.
The most serious infestations which are changing indigenous habitats include: * Italian
Buckthorn,*Box Thorn, *Apple of Sodom, *Spear Thistle, *St John’s Wort, *English
Blackberry. *Tall Fescue and other weedy grasses. Most of the habitat-changing weed
outbreaks have the potential to take over causing large changes and destruction of essential
habitats. Consequently a large reduction in fauna population densities and species diversity
will occur.
152
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Current management of habitat changing weeds is currently being conducted by MPS.
However new out-breaks of St John’s Wort on the adjoining VicRoads Reservation freeway
and land known as 9 St Elmos Close. St John’s Wort is a serious invading species whose
distribution is dramatically increased in association with vegetation slashing works.
Populations of this weed on the freeway reservation will continue to spread through-out the
Tootgarook Wetland unless this weed species is actively managed for the long term.
Management of weeds must recognise that some of the existing populations of weeds
support a diverse range of native fauna and should only be controlled over an extended
period of time. Weeds being used as habitat by small birds and possums must be replaced
with indigenous shrubs.
Out-breaks of *St John’s Wort are occurring at Sanctuary Park on the raised grasslands and are threatening changes to habitat. Photo
M.Legg 2014.
3.5.6.3
Relative importance of key habitats
The reserve is part of the northern section of Tootgarook Wetland that still retains
significant diverse habitat. The dense reed and swamp scrub habitats support breeding pairs
of state and regionally threatened wetland bird species, while other species utilize these
sites for foraging activities. Populations of FFG listed Swamp Skinks and state threatened
Glossy Grass Skink are found to inhabit the swamp scrub edges and the raised grasslands,
especially the edges that retain poa tussocks. Swamp Skinks were also observed at the base
153
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
of some Gahnia tussocks which are rare through-out the reserve. Within Tootgarook
Wetlands Gahnia tussocks are critical components of Swamp Skink habitat especially as a
refuge during inundation periods.
The state threatened Southern Toadlet is also a breeding resident especially in sites that
become inundated during early winter such-as the edges of the raised grasslands and the
wetlands along the north-eastern edge. The reserve is an extremely important site for the
future survival of threatened and endangered species within Tootgarook Wetland.
Old-growth stands of swamp scrub provide homes for possums and a variety of bird species
while fallen trunks within these patches provides homes for reptiles, amphibians and insect
species. Two species of owl were observed roosting in some of the swamp scrub patches
and utilize these sites to hunt from.
This photo shows the important swamp scrub and Tall Marsh EVC habitats within Sanctuary Park. Photo M. Legg 2014.
The large patches of EVC Tall Marsh (picture above) dominated by Common Reed are mainly
found within the western section of the reserve and is an important breeding & feeding site
for rails, crakes, night herons, egrets, spoonbills, snipe and the migratory Clamorous ReedWarbler.
154
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The EPBC listed endangered Australasian Bittern is believed to be breeding within this area.
It is imperative that future environmental monitoring of the wetland include the search for
breeding sites of the bittern. Current estimated population of the Australasian Bittern in
Victoria is approximately 250 individuals.
Comment is made that remnant native vegetation observed during this survey including the
endangered EVC South Gippsland Plains Grassland and EVC Freshwater Swamp Scrub located
on adjoining land known as 9 St Elmos Close. This remnant vegetation and associated
habitat is regarded as an extremely important refuge during times of inundation for several
terrestrial and semi-terrestrial fauna species. Habitat on this land acts as a dry exposed
island when the surrounding land floods during winter and spring (M. Legg fld. obs. 201314). Recent observed slashing of this site has been accompanied by the destruction of
remaining tussock grasses. Over the last two years tussock grasses have appeared to be reestablishing in some parts of the site. Previous fauna surveys of the raised grasslands of
Sanctuary Park and nearby freeway reservation revealed the presence of the FFG listed
White-footed Dunnart. This species utilizes the grasslands as critical breeding habitat and is
highly important for the future survival of this threatened species within Tootgarook
Wetland. Over the last decade field surveys by the author have revealed a significant decline
of the local population of White-footed Dunnart.
Strong recommendation is given to the need for a review of existing planning controls to
better recognise the environmental values of the above land and for potential transfer of the
land known as 9 St Elmos Close to council and to be managed as a conservation reserve in
conjunction the abutting Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve. If these two parcels of land were
managed for conservation purposes then collectively they maybe of state conservation
significance.
Above shows the South Gippsland Plains Grassland at Sanctuary Park which is vital habitat for terrestrial fauna species.
Photo M. Legg 2014.
155
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
During recent years in the north-west corner of Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve, habitat
restoration projects continue to be conducted along the banks of Chinaman’s Creek and
which now provide ideal habitat for terrestrial and semi-terrestrial species. Tussock grasses
were planted and a variety of terrestrial hollow bearing logs were deployed. Several
threatened fauna species now occupy the enhanced habitat such as state threatened Swamp
and Glossy Grass Skinks. FFG listed Swamp Skinks have taken up residency within some of
the deployed habitat logs as depicted in the photo below.
The Swamp Skink pictured above quickly took up residency at Sanctuary Park in this deployed habitat log. Photo Cameron Brown 2013.
3.5.6.4
Bio-links from the reserve to surrounding vegetation
The reserve an important section of remaining habitat found along the northern section of
Tootgarook Wetland linking the following reserves:x
VicRoads freeway reserve
x
MPS 40 Colchester Road Reserve
x
MPS Hiscock Road Reserve
x
Boneo Park (Rob McNaught’s property)
x
Drum Drum Alloc Creek and Chinaman’s Creek which extends down to Port Phillip
and is an important wildlife biolink between the bay, Tootgarook Wetland and the
foothills to the east.
The biolink between the above land parcels is critical to maintaining connected habitat and
biodiversity occupying the wetland.
156
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.6.5
FEIS assessments
During this survey Broad Vegetation Types (BVT) grasslands, scrub (wet) and wetlands &
swamps were assessed within the reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool. This is an
assessment of habitat specific fauna species that quickly disappear when their habitat
changes at a rapid rate. The assessments within the reserve indicated that 73% of FEIS’s
were present within grasslands, 61% of FEIS‟s were present within scrub and 73% within
wetlands & swamps. This indicates a phase 2 extinction rate of FEIS’s within BVT’s assessed
within the reserve.
Assessments indicted that large tree hollows (usually associate with eucalypts) are absent
and only found in some of the old-growth swamp scrub patches (these hollows are
smallish). Terrestrial logs with small hollows are found in re-vegetated areas and within oldgrowth swamp scrub patches within the reserve. On-going and integrated feral control
programs need to continue across the landscape in order to maintain and increase fauna
species diversity and population densities within Tootgarook Wetland.
3.5.6.6
Comparing the results of this survey with the 2005-06 survey
In the 2005-06 survey 92 species of fauna (82 indigenous and ten introduced) were
identified within the reserve. During this survey 122 species of fauna (112 indigenous and
ten introduced) were identified within the reserve which is an increase of 30 new fauna
species. This is a 30.4% increase in fauna species identified during this survey compared to
the previous survey.
Through-out the 2005-06 & 2013-14 surveys bird species were countered for each month
and compiled into the graph below. In the 2005-06 survey bird species were countered each
month from June 2005 to January 2006 and within the 2013-14 survey, bird species were
countered each month from October 2013 to May 2014. This only allows for 4 months of
comparisons between both surveys.
According to graph 10, bird species diversity within the reserve was lowest in 2005-06
during June (27 species) and during 2013-14 in October (36 species). During 2005-06 bird
species diversity peaked in November (50 species) and during 2013-14 they peaked in
February (57 species). Both species and population densities of birds appear to have
increased by around 30% in the period between the 2005-06 survey and this survey.
157
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Graph 10: Fluctuations in bird species diversity within Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve during the
2005-06 and 2013 -14 fauna surveys (M. Legg 2006 & 2014).
60
50
40
30
2005-06 survey
2013-14 survey
20
10
0
Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May
Since the 2005-06 survey the following fauna species have disappeared from the reserve
and were not identified during this survey: Little-Pied Cormorant, Australasian Shoveler,
Eurasian Coot, Australian Hobby and Rufous Whistler,
The following fauna species are newly identified species to the reserve and were identified
during this survey but not identified during the 2005-06 survey: Tupong, Haswell’s Froglet,
Southern Toadlet, Eastern Three-lined Skink, Southern Grass Skink, Great Cormorant,
Chestnut Teal, Baillon’s Crake, Great Egret, Australasian Bittern, Stubble Quail, Collared
Sparrowhawk, Peregrine Falcon, Nankeen Kestrel, Galah, Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Eastern
Rosella, Southern Boobook, Barn Owl, Tawny Frogmouth, Spotted Pardalote, Yellow
Thornbill, Little Wattlebird, Eastern Spinebill, Pink Robin, Flame Robin, Eastern Yellow Robin,
Grey Shrike Thrush, Willy Wagtail, Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, Mistletoebird, White-footed
Dunnart, Common Brushtail Possum and Little Forest Bat.
3.5.6.7
Monitoring FEIS’s and population densities within the reserve
A monitoring program within the reserve for FEIS species including threatened species
(found to be present) needs to be developed to measure fluctuations in population densities
and loss of species. Such species considered for future monitoring projects are listed in
tables 50, 51 & 52 of this report.
A separate monitoring program for the EPBC listed Australasian Bittern needs to be designed
and implemented immediately. This will help protect the species and identify if and where
they are breeding.
158
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.6.8
Encroachment, vegetation removal and habitat loss on the northern
boundary associated with Village Glen Golf Course
The field survey revealed encroachment to the north-east reserve boundary from the
adjoining Village Glen Golf Course involving the following:x
Removal of endangered Freshwater Swamp Scrub EVC, rare Brackish Wetland EVC
and Tall Marsh EVC
x
Filling of the land
x
Alteration to the hydrology
x
Construction of a sealed path/road associated with the use and management of the
golf course
x
Replacement of indigenous vegetation with introduced grasses associated with the
golf course fairways and greens.
x
Possible use of herbicides to maintain the clearance of vegetation growth in the area
subject to encroachment.
x
Possible use of fertilizers for turf management with potential to cause associated
run-off to the adjoining wetland.
Photo shows the adjacent Village Glen Golf Course encroaching onto Sanctuary Park. Photo M. Legg 2014.
159
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.5.6.7
Recommendations for Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
The following management recommendations are set out to help the study site’s managers
to manage the fauna and habitat more appropriately in accordance with flora and fauna
requirements.
x
Immediately implement an Australasian Bittern monitoring program to
determine
breeding
and
foraging
sites
which
require
full
on-going
protection.
x
Adopt management recommendations from the Australasian Bittern Recovery
and Action Plans and Implement through-out the greater Tootgarook
Wetland.
x
Fully protect the Tall Marsh and Gahnia Sedgeland EVC habitats of the
Australasian Bittern from development and destruction on both private and
public land especially at 92 Elizabeth Avenue.
x
Adopt management recommendations from state threatened fauna species
(which are listed on the FFG ACT 1988) Recovery and Action Plans and
Implement through-out the greater Tootgarook Wetland.
x
Continue to conduct fauna surveys every five years and carry out yearly
monitoring of FEIS’s, threatened indigenous fauna species and feral species
using Scout-guard cameras and analysing fox scats.
x
Investigate the potential transfer of the land known as 9 St Elmos Close to
council and to be managed as a conservation reserve in conjunction the
abutting Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve.
x
Remove targeted weeds over a staged period and deploy habitat logs with
small hollows along the edges of the raised grassland.
x
Commence a weeding program on St John’s Wort and engage VicRoads and
property owner of 9 St Elmos Close to undertake integrated weed
management of St John’s Wort and other weeds from their land parcels.
x
That the shire engages with VicRoads and property owner of 9 St Elmos Close
to restore their raised grasslands (South Gippsland Plains Grassland EVC).
x
Continue to include the reserve in the MPS feral control programs with ongoing focus on *Red Fox, *Feral Cat and *Black Rat.
x
Implement within the reserve and adjoining lands a fauna nesting box
program and monitor. Focus on constructing nesting boxes for wetland birds,
owls and micro-bats.
160
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
x
Council as the managers of the reserve should develop and install signage
interpreting the environmental, cultural and hydro-geological functions of
the land parcel at a prominent location possibly at the Elizabeth Road
entrance.
x
Address key threats to habitat and bio-diversity.
Management actions should include the following and during weeding projects follow these
simple rules:
o
Don’t spray herbicide in known Southern Toadlet habitat.
o
Conduct weeding in sections and span the process over five or so
years. Start from the good areas and work outwards and control
invading weeds on the edges.
o
Only remove woody weeds or conduct control burns during the nonbird breeding season.
o
Leave if Eastern Yellow Robins or other birds are nesting.
o
Allow natural regeneration to occur.
o
If ringtail possum dreys or bird nests occur in weeds then ring-bark
with-out poisoning and follow-up after a year.
161
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.6 Truemans Road landfill site (50m wide corridor inside
eastern boundary and observations on adjoining land known
as 92 Elizabeth Avenue)
3.6.1
Study site
The site is located inside the eastern boundary of the former Truemans Road Land Fill site,
and adjoins land known as 92 Elizabeth Street, Hiscock Road Reserve and Boneo Park. An
area of 50m was subject to the survey along a frontage of approximately 600m length.
Permission was granted by Mr John O’Grady (part owner of 92 Elizabeth Avenue) to conduct
observation from the landfill site onto subject land.
The location is Melways reference number 169 G6 & 7. The study site comprises elevated
disturbed and filled areas associated with the former land fill site, areas subject to
inundation, long patches of Tall Marsh EVC and small patches of Freshwater Swamp Scrub
EVC.
3.6.2
Ecological Vegetation Classes
Six Ecological Vegetation classes (EVC’s) are present within the study site and includes EVC’s
(053) Freshwater Swamp Scrub, (132) South Gippsland Plains Grassland, (653) Aquatic
Herbland, (656) Brackish Wetland, (821) Tall Marsh, (858) Coastal Alkaline Scrub and (968)
Gahnia Sedgeland. Other EVC’s are probably apparent but have not been mapped at present.
The diversity of EVC’s constitutes different habitat types which provide homes for a high
diversity of fauna species. Majority of these EVC’s are of high quality apart from South
Gippsland Plains Grassland and Coastal Alkaline Scrub. These two EVC’s have infestations of
habitat changing weeds and the swamp scrub has colonized on parts of the land fill. The
EVC’s that have been determined within the site and their status are displayed in the table
below.
Table 43: EVC’s present within the eastern boundary of the Truemans Road landfill site.
EVC No
EVC’s
Status within Gippsland
Plain Bioregion
053
132
653
656
821
858
968
Freshwater Swamp Scrub
South Gippsland Plains Grassland
Aquatic Herbland
Brackish Wetland
Tall Marsh
Coastal Alkaline Scrub
Gahnia Sedgeland
Endangered
Endangered
Endangered
Rare
No listing
Depleted
162
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.6.3
Fauna detected within the study site
A total of 93 species of fauna were recorded within the site during this survey. Of these 83
species are native and ten species are introduced. These consist of one species of Decapod
Crustacean, three species of fish (of which one species is introduced), six species of
amphibians, 11 species of reptiles (of which one species is a tortoise, eight species are
lizards and two species are snakes), 61 species of birds (of these 55 are native species and
six species are introduced) and eleven species of mammals of which four species are
introduced.
3.6.4
Results of field work conducted within the study site during this
survey (including dip netting, Elliot traps, scat analysis, bird
population survey, spotlighting, bat detection, FEIS Assessments and
observations).
3.6.4.1
Fish sampling results
TABLE 54: Fish sampled in dip nets deployed throughout the Truemans Road landfill site, February 2014.
Species
Date
Short-finned Eel
Common Galaxias
*Mosquitofish
14-02-14
14-02-14
14-02-14
15-02-14
3.6.4.2
Number
sampled
1
2
40+
30+
Area sampled
Water holes in south-east corner.
As above.
As above.
As above.
Bird species and population density survey results
TABLE 55: Bird species and population densities detected for each month at the former Truemans Road
landfill site, October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’ demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
Australian Pelican
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Chestnut Teal
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Spotless Crake
Purple Swamphen
White-necked Heron
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Little Egret
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Masked Lapwing
Black-winged Stilt
Pacific Gull
Whiskered Tern
6
7
6
10+
4B
2B
5
5
4
20+
4B
2B
3
8
7
10+
4B
2B
38
2
2
36
6
2
3
11
20+
4
10+
20+
2
30+
11
2
2
2
13
10+
8
6B
6B
2
11
3
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
2
6
2B
4
4
2
3
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
33
6
70+
4
6
3
12
4
5
7
7
2
6
4
4
4
4
4
6
3
2
4
2
4
1
2
3
2
163
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
SPECIES
Black-shouldered Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
*Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Flame Robin
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
*Skylark
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
*European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
3.6.4.3
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
2
2
1
2
2ad2ju
2ad
1
2
2
2
2
6B
2
6B
4
2
8B
2
2ad 2ju
10+
2ad
10+
5
10+
10+
2
10+
4
16
20+
6
3
10+
10+
6
16
10+
10+
4B
4B
2B
30+B
30+B
30+B
10+
30+B
10+
40+
20=B
10+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
10+B
30+
20+
10+
2
3
12
40+
6
40+
20+
20+
4
6
20+
40+
8
40+
30+
10+
4
8
20+
40+
4
40+
30+
10+
3
10+
20+
2
4
4
4
6
4
4
8
4B
4B
2
4B
4B
6
6
6
3
6
6
2
3
10+
5
6
6
4
4
6
3
4
6
8
6
4
4
5
5
2
4
4
2
4
6
6
9
4B
6
4B
4B
6B
2B
2B
6B
2B
2B
6B
2B
2B
4B
2B
4B
2B
4B
2B
6B
4B
6B
4B
6
6B
4B
6B
4B
16
6B
4B
6B
4B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+
10+
4
10+B
10+B
6B
36
10+
10+
10
10+
10+
70+
30+
20+
10+
10+
80+
20+
10+
40+
5
6
5
12
8
14
10+
10+
16
10+
50+
20+
10+
40+
10+
10+
10+
10+
40+
20+
10+
40+
10+
10+
20+
20+
10+
20+
Elliot trap survey results
TABLE 56: Fauna sampled in Elliot traps deployed through-out the Truemans Road landfill site,
February 2014.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Skink
14-02-14
15-02-14
16-02-14
14-02-14
14-02-14
15-02-14
16-02-14
16-02-14
17-02-14
17-02-14
1m
1m
1f
3
4
2
4
3
1
2
Swamp Rat
Area detected
Transect 1 trap 3.
Transect 1, trap 5.
Transect 2, trap 9.
Transect 1, traps 6, 7 & 11.
Transect 2, traps1, 4, 9 & 12.
Transect 1, traps 6 & 8.
Transect 1, traps 1, 3, 5 &10.
Transect 2, traps 3, 6 & 11.
Transect 1, trap 9.
Transect 2, traps 4 & 14.
164
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
*Black Rat
16-02-14
17-02-14
15-02-14
17-02-14
1
1
2
2
*House Mouse
3.6.4.4
Area detected
Transect 1, trap 15.
Transect 2, trap 7.
Transect 1, traps 2 & 10.
Transect 2, trap 2 & 12.
Feral predator scat analysis
TABLE 57: Mammal hairs identified in fox and cat scats collected through-out the Truemans Road landfill
site, November 2013 to April 2014.
Predator Species
scat
Date collected
*Fox 1
*Fox 2
*Fox 3
*Cat 1
3.6.4.5
02-02-14
02-02-14
18-03-14
18-03-14
Non mammal remains
Mammal hairs analyzed within scat
Berries
Nil
Berries
Feathers
Nil.
Rat sp.
Nil.
Nil.
Spotlight walk results
TABLE 58: Fauna observed during spotlighting throughout the Truemans Road landfill site,
December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
Amphibians
Common Froglet
Haswell’s Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Birds
Lewin’s Rail
Spotless Crake
Masked Lapwing
Mammals
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
18-12-13
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
100+
50+
20+
20+
20+
5+
20+
50+
20+
20+
20+
10+
10+
Edges of inundated areas.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
15-04-14
15-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
2
2
8
6
6
In reeds towards the southern end.
As above
Open areas.
As above.
As above
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
6
4
3
2
1
3
Shrubs
As above.
As above
In reeds towards the southern end.
As above.
As above
165
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
Bat sps
12-02-14
15-04-14
14-04-14
15-04-14
14-04-14
18-12-13
3 sps
2 sps
2 sps
2
1
1
Flying through-out.
As above.
As above
Open areas
As above.
Northern end.
*Fox
*Feral Cat
3.6.4.6
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
TABLE 59: Micro bats recorded on the Anabat II Bat Detector through-out the Truemans Road
landfill site, December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Little Forest Bat
3.6.4.7
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
15-04-14
18-12-13
12
15
9
15
21
32
4
Flying above vegetation.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
As above.
Scout-guard camera deployment
No Scout-guard cameras were deployed at this site.
3.6.4.8
Current status of Broad Vegetation Class ecosystems within the
study site using FEIS rapid assessment tool
After accessing within the study site using the FEIS rapid assessment tool, the tables below
list the FEIS’s that still occur and the species which have disappeared within Broad
Vegetation Classes across the site. A score is also given at a rating from 1 to 5 (which
relates to which extinction phase the site is currently experiencing) depending on loss of
FEIS’s.
166
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 60: FEIS Assessment of BVT: Grasslands within the Truemans Road landfill site.
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
Tree Dragon
Whites Skink
Swamp Skink
Eastern three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
or
Common Blue-tongue
White-lipped Snake
Stubble Quail
Painted Button Quail
Buff-banded Rail
Southern Emu-wren
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
Short-beaked Echidna
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Swamp Rat
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have either
disappeared or become
extinct within the study site
based on this survey.
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction phase
10 of the 22 FEIS’s
have disappeared
from grasslands
within the study site.
55% of FEIS’s still
remain which
indicates a phase 3
extinction rate within
the grasslands
through-out the study
site.
Table 61: FEIS Assessment of BVT: Coastal Scrub within the Truemans Road landfill site.
Reptiles
Tree Dragon
Whites Skink
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Metallic Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
or
Common Blue-tongue
White-lipped Snake
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have either
disappeared or become
extinct within the study site
based on this survey.
Birds
Stubble Quail
Painted Button Quail
Eastern Rosella
Crimson Rosella
Southern Boobook
Powerful Owl
Singing Honeyeater
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Mistletoebird
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction phase
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
20 of the 32 FEIS’s
have disappeared
from Coastal Scrub
within the study
site.
38% of FEIS’s still
remain which
indicates a phase
3-4 extinction rate
within coastal scrub
of the study site.
167
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 62:
FEIS Assessment of BVT: Wetlands & Swamps within the Truemans Road landfill site.
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
Decapod
Crustaceans
& Fish
Amphibians
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
Engaeus sp
Spotted Galaxias
Dwarf Galaxias
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Growling Grass Frog
Common Longnecked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Ballions Crake
Spotless Crake
Australasian Bittern
Nankeen Night Heron
Great Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Southern Emu-wren
White-fronted Chat
Clamorous Reed Warbler
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Swamp Rat
KEY
Red writing
indicates species
that have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the study
site based on
this survey.
3.6.5
3.6.5.1
13 of the 26
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from the
wetlands and
swamps within
the study site.
50% of FEIS’s
still remain which
indicates a
phase
3 extinction rate
within the
wetlands and
swamps
through-out the
study site.
Significant fauna of the eastern edge of the Former Trumans Road
land fill site
Significant fauna detected throughout the reserve during this survey.
Nationally significant species listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act
1999 were not detected during this survey. However three species are listed as
internationally migratory under the EPBC Act. Twelve State significant species were recorded
during this study. One species has been nominated and four species are listed under the
Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 as threatened. In addition, a further 17 species
recorded are considered to be of regional significance and four species recorded are
considered to be of high local significance. The remaining native fauna utilizing the study
site are considered to be at a local significance level due to large population and habitat
losses within the local area (Mornington Peninsula Shire).
3.6.5.2
Ecological significance of the study site.
This site is the most highly disturbed wetland site surveyed in this study. Despite the level
of disturbance this site supports endangered native vegetation and FFG listed fauna species
along with other species listed at state and regional levels. This portion of the former land
fill site should be recognized and managed for the presence of these state & regionally
threatened and endangered listed species. This part of Tootgarook Wetland remains subject
to seasonal inundation associated with the reduced disturbance and filling on the edge of
168
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
the land fill. This site is not currently managed by MPS for its conservation values. This site
abuts the land along Hiscock Road where the EPBC listed Australasian Bittern was recently
sighted in 2014.
3.6.5.3
Habitat significance
Tall Marsh EVC on this site is potential habitat for the EPBC listed Australasian Bittern and
other FFG listed fauna. Future management of the site by the MPS should be undertaken in
accordance with the guidelines contained in the EPBC and FFG recovery plans and action
statements.
The vegetation communities within the site contain important habitat for fauna species,
especially threatened species at a state and regional level. The swamp shrub communities
support a low diversity of arboreal mammals and a medium diversity of avifauna, The
terrestrial vegetation supports a medium to high diversity of terrestrial fauna and scrubdwelling avifauna. The Tall Marsh and other wetland vegetation support many endangered
and threatened bird species along with wetland flora communities. Some feral species
(such-as Feral Cats,*Red Fox and *Black Rat) are threatening some of the fauna diversity
within the site and are currently being controlled within the surrounding area.
3.6.5.4
Defining significant species
Fauna within the site were classed according to their high local, regional and state levels. As
lists of regionally and locally significant fauna aren’t available from relevant government
authorities, those significant taxa were assessed by the author from his previous records
within the bioregion and Mornington Peninsula Shire.
Key to defining significant species
Signif
N
S
R
HL
DSE
FFG
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Cen
End
Vul
LR
NT
DD
Ls
M
Un
MC
LC
C
Lim
Significant/status of species is designated by:
National
State
Regional
High Local
Advisory list of threatened Vertebrate in Victoria-2013 (DSE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guaranteed Act 1988
Action Plan approved by Environmental Australia
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
International Treaties, C=China (CAMBA) and J=Japan (JAMBA).
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
lower risk-near threatened
Near Threatened
data deficient
Listed
Migratory under the EPBC Act
Uncommon
Moderately Common
Locally Common
Common
Limited
169
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
TABLE 63: Significant fauna detected throughout the Truemans Road landfill site during this survey.
Common Name
Amphibians
Southern Toadlet
Reptiles
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
Birds
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Spotless Crake
Great Egret
Little Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Black-winged Stilt
Whiskered Tern
Pacific Gull
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Musk Lorikeet
White-throated Needletail
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Crescent Honeyeater
Flame Robin
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Mammals
Short-beaked Echidna
Black Wallaby
Micro bats occurring throughout.
Swamp Rat
Scientific Name
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Sig
DSE.
S
Vul
Chelodinia longicollis
Bassian duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Saproscincus mustellina
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Australeps superbus
S
R
R
S
R
R
R
HL
DD
MC
MC
Vul
MC
MC
MC
C
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzanatabuensis
Ardea alba
Egretta garzetta
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Himantopus himantopus
Chlidonias hybridus
Larus pacificus
Aquila audax
Circus assimilis
Circus approximans
Glossopsitta concinna
Hirundapus caudacutus
Acanthiza chrysorrhoa
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Petroica phoenicea
Acrocephalus stentoreus
R
S
R
S
S
S
S
R
S
S
HL
S
HL
HL
S
R
R
R
R
Un
Vul
MC
Vul
En
LR
LR
Un
LR
LR
Un
LR
MC
MC
Vul
MC
MC
Un
Un
Tachyglossus aculeatus
Wallabia bicolor
Tadarida, Chalinolobus &
Vespadelus sps.
Rattus lutreolus
R
R
R
C
MC
C
R
C
FFG.
ActPl
Ls
Yes
Ls
Yes
Ls
Ls
Yes
Yes
EPBC
N
TR
M
CJ
M
CJ
M
CJ
Map 9 below shows the locations of state threatened fauna species which were identified
within the reserve during this survey. Please note that small flocks of Pacific Gull and Whitethroated Needletail were observed flying over the study site and didn’t land within. This
means they do not appear on map 9.
170
KEY
Eastern boundary of former land
fill site
Study site boundaries
Southern Toadlet
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Great Egret
Little Egret
Australasian Bittern
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Whiskered Tern
Spotted Harrier
Locations of State significant fauna species identified along
the eastern edge of the Truemans Road landfill site
MAP 9
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
171
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.6.6
Discussion
3.6.6.1
Indigenous Fauna
3.6.6.1.1
Decapod Crustacean
One species of Decapod Crustacean was identified along the edges of the site mainly where
reeds occur and appears to be in a healthy population condition. In these communities
typical mud chimneys were observed on the soil surface (see photo below). Colonies of
burrowing crayfish are excellent environmental health indicators of the water table below
the surface.
Typical chimney construction of mud at the base of this Engaeus species burrow-entrance along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road
land fill site. Photo M. Legg 2014.
3.6.6.1.2
Fish
Two species of indigenous fish the Short-fined Eel & Common Galaxias and the introduced
*Mosquitofish were found to inhabit water holes as this section of the wetland dried out
during summer. All species of fish were sampled in dip nets and were found to be in a dying
condition as water levels and oxygen levels dried up.
172
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The *Mosquitofish was found to be common through-out the water holes but all died when
they dried up. The *Mosquitofish and other species provide a large food source for tortoises
and wetland bird species especially diving and wading birds.
3.6.6.1.3
Amphibians
High population densities of Common Froglet, Southern Bullfrog, Verreaux’s Tree Frog and
Southern Brown Tree Frog were found to inhabit the inundated areas along the site. All
appear to have healthy populations with population densities varying from medium to high
density levels.
During mid autumn the state threatened Southern Toadlet was heard calling in low lying
areas that become flooded in winter. Population densities appear to be at a medium level
and calls increased as rainfall increased. During late spring 2013 Haswell’s Froglet was
identified along the site mainly from the edges of the wetland. The population densities of
this species appear to be at a low level.
Rarer species which weren’t sampled during this survey and are probably extinct within the
area include: Victorian Smooth Froglet, Spotted Marsh Frog, Stripped Marsh Frog and
Growling Grass Frog. It is unlikely that future surveys within the greater area would identify
these species.
3.6.6.1.4
Reptiles
Through-out the site reptile species and population densities appeared to be at a
reasonably high diversity and at a low to medium population density level. Population
densities probably fluctuate due to the wetland side becoming inundated during winter and
spring. The raised fill along the site is an important refuge for reptile species during
inundation phases. The reptiles identified during this survey period and their habitats are
discussed below.
Reptiles identified along the site include a species of tortoise, lizards and snakes. The
occasional Common Long-necked Tortoise was observed in flooded sites, and water holes,
feeding upon stranded fish. Population densities appear to be stable within this area.
Along the site the Eastern Three-lined Skink was mainly observed amongst grass patches.
Here they were observed either sunning themselves next to grasses or found under fallen
debris.
173
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Along the site the FFG listed Swamp Skink appears to be in a low population density level.
Here three specimens were sampled in Elliot traps and no others were observed. They were
sampled on the edges of the raised fill amongst *Kikuyu.
Other small skinks observed through-out the reserve included: Delicate Skink, Garden
Skink, Metallic Skink and Weasel Skink. All were observed either amongst, or found on or
under logs and fallen debris. The occasional Blotched & Common Blue-tongues were
observed through-out the raised fill and both species appear to be at a low population
density level.
Two species of snake were observed during the survey period, mainly on the edges of the
raised fill. These include: Lowland Copperhead and Tiger Snake. The copperhead & Tiger
Snake were observed sunning themselves amongst grasses. Both species population density
levels appear to be at low levels.
3.6.6.1.5
Birds
Along the site a medium diversity of bird species inhabits the various habitats and can be
divided into three categories:
x
wetland birds
x
woodland birds
x
Introduced birds
Wetland birds
During this survey several species of wetland birds were either identified within the different
habitats along the site or observed flying overhead on their way to other parts of
Tootgarook Wetland. Wetland birds identified flying overhead include: Australian Pelican,
Pacific Gull and Whiskered Tern.
Wetland birds that were observed either breeding or feeding along the site include:, Black
Swan, Pacific Black Duck, Chestnut Teal, Buff-banded Rail, FFG listed Lewin’s Rail, Spotless
Crake, Purple Swamphen, White-necked Heron, White-faced Heron, FFG listed Great Egret,
FFG listed Little Egret, Australian White Ibis, Straw-necked Ibis, Royal Spoonbill,
internationally migratory Latham’s Snipe, Masked Lapwing and Black-winged Stilt. Several of
these species are either endangered or threatened at state and regional levels and are
important ecological components of the greater Tootgarook Wetland.
The FFG listed Little Egret was detected in this area during late 2013 (depicted below) and is
a new species for the wetland.
174
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Great Egrets, Little Egrets, White-necked Herons and Purple Swamphens pictured along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road land fill
site. Photo Cameron Brown 2013.
A Royal Spoonbill portraying breeding plumage and a pair of Black Swans photographed along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road
land fill site. Photos M. Legg 2013.
A Great Egret and several Purple swamphens feeding along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road land fill site. Photo M. Legg 2013.
175
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Black Swans and a Black-winged Stilt feeding along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road land fill site. Photo M. Legg 2013.
Royal Spoonbills and a Purple Swamphen feeding along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road land fill site.
Photo Cameron Brown 2013.
Great Egret and Black-winged Stilt feeding along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road land fill site. Photos M. Legg 2013.
176
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Woodland birds
Through-out the site woodland birds were found to inhabit the indigenous and exotic scrub
patches, reeds and grasslands habitats. These species are discussed below.
Birds of prey were regularly observed flying over the site while hunting for food, performing
courtship displays and hunting from or roosting in trees & scrub patches. They include:
Black-shouldered Kite, Wedge-tailed Eagle, Spotted Harrier and Swamp Harrier, Juvenile
Black-shouldered Kites and Swamp Harriers were observed during summer and bred nearby.
The Wedge-tailed Eagle and Spotted Harrier bred elsewhere.
Occasionally small flocks of Galah, Rainbow Lorikeet and Musk Lorikeet were observed flying
overhead and bred elsewhere.
Migratory birds within Australasia arrived within the study site during spring or autumn and
include Shining Bronze-Cuckoo, Yellow-rumped Thornbill, Flame Robin, Grey Fantail, Blackfaced Cuckoo-shrike, Welcome Swallow, Clamorous Reed Warbler, Mistletoebird and
Silvereye. Majority of the species mentioned above bred within the study site or nearby and
left for northern or eastern Australia during autumn post breeding. After breeding the
Yellow-rumped Thornbill and Silvereyes migrate to the peninsula from Tasmania and other
parts of Victoria. Within the Tall Marsh EVC communities the Clamorous Reed Warbler bred
within Common Reed patches. The cuckoo is parasitic and lays its eggs in the nests of
honeyeaters, finches, wrens & thornbills and migrate to New Guinea after breeding.
Small flocks of White-throated Needletail were observed flying overhead and feeding on
insects during summer months. They breed in Korea and migrate to Australia during
summer where they can be observed in aerial flight feeding on insects usually in front of
summer storms.
Superb Fairy-wren, White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill are common permanent
breeding residents of scrub thickets, weedy shrubs and undergrowth within the site. Small
flocks of Spotted Pardalote were observed during autumn feeding in the canopies of swamp
scrub.
Six species of honeyeaters were recorded throughout the site, mainly within the swamp
scrub and weed shrub patches. These include the Red Wattlebird, Little Wattlebird, Spinycheeked Honeyeater, White-plumed Honeyeater, Crescent Honeyeater and New Holland
Honeyeater All species are either breeding residents or breed nearby to the site.
177
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Common open country birds such-as Willy Wagtail, Magpie-lark, Grey Butcherbird,
Australian Magpie, Australian Raven and Little Raven are common to rare visitors or
breeding residents within the site.
Flocks of Golden-headed Cisticola and Little Grassbird were observed in grassy or Common
Reed sites where both species bred. During autumn small flocks of Red-browed Finch were
observed feeding along the site on grass seeds.
Introduced Birds
Six species of introduced birds inhabit the site and include: *Spotted Turtle-Dove, *Skylark,
*European Goldfinch, *Common Blackbird, *Common Starling and *Common Myna. The
*Spotted Turtle-Dove was mainly encountered along the northern section in association with
the urban housing. *Skylarks were observed breeding in grasses while the *European
Goldfinch and *Common Blackbird are breeding residents through-out. The *Common
Starling and *Common Myna are mainly foraging visitors. Large flocks of starlings and
mynas were observed during autumn feeding on weedy fruits. The *Common Blackbird and
*Common Starling are prolific spreaders of noxious and environmental weed seed.
3.6.6.1.5.1
Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
Results from the graph below indicate that bird species diversity along the site was the
lowest (33) during October and peaked at 43 species during February. This can be attributed
to post breeding period when bird species tend to move around from breeding sites to other
habitat patches adjacent to the site or within the greater area. The table below lists the
fluctuations in bird species diversity, along the site and during each month of the survey
period.
Graph 11: Fluctuations in bird species diversity along the Truemans Road landfill site over an eight
month period during this survey.
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
No of bird species
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
178
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.6.6.1.6
Mammals
During this survey a low to medium diversity of mammal species was recorded within the
site. Other species that should occur but were found to be absent include: White-footed
Dunnart, Agile Antechinus, Dusky Antechinus, Long-nosed Bandicoot, Southern Brown
Bandicoot, Common Wombat, Eastern Grey Kangaroo and Water Rat. Some of these species
were known to occur within the area over the last three decades. The mammals recorded
during this survey are discussed below.
Monotremes
Occasional Short-beaked Echidna was encountered along the site and diggings from those
individuals were occasionally encountered. Echidnas are breeding residents within the area
whom roam over large areas utilizing most habitats that contain a year-round supply of
sought-after termites and ants.
Marsupials
The only nocturnal possum encountered during the survey period was the Common Ringtail
Possum. Several ringtail possums were observed during spotlight walks, mainly within the
scrub canopies. Small numbers were observed or encountered either feeding in the swamp
scrub canopies, weedy shrubs, heard calling when disturbed and found in dreys which are
constructed within these thickets. Juveniles of ringtail possums were observed in autumn.
During spotlight walks the occasional Black Wallaby was encountered along the site and
scats were also encountered during field work.
Placental Mammals
Three nights of recording micro-bat echolocation calls were conducted throughout this
survey. Micro-bats were seen on warm nights flying past the light beam of a torch, catching
and eating insects while in flight. Future micro-bat recordings could result in further species
identification, as some species are common one month and then absent the next. All
species of micro-bats that occur along the site are hollow dependent, nocturnal, and eat
three times their body weight in insects each night. Most species are feeding visitors to the
site and roost or breed elsewhere.
Swamp Rat populations appear to be at a stable level and were regularly sampled in Elliot
traps. Here they occupy dense understory grass patches whether they be indigenous or
weedy and don’t become inundated with water. Underneath this vegetation they excavate
runways and build nest chambers at the end in burrows up to one meter long. Such activity
179
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
is apparent throughout their distribution along the site. Swamp Rats were mainly
encountered on the edges of the raised fill sites and the wetland.
3.6.6.1.6.1
Feral mammals
*Red Fox
*Red Fox population densities appear to be low through-out the site and surrounding area
which is due to the MPS feral predator control program. This has greatly reduced the fox
population through-out Tootgarook Wetland and surrounding areas. The occasional fox scat
was mainly found in cleared areas through-out the site. The MPS feral predator control
program should include this site as part of its feral control program. Appropriate method of
fox control within the study site includes deploying foothold traps.
*Feral Cat
One *Feral Cat or its scats were encountered along the site and their population densities
appear to be at a low level. These cats were probably residents of the adjacent urban
estates. *Feral Cats cause large-scale destruction of lizard and small bird populations and
need urgent control. The MPS feral predator control program should include the study site
as part of its feral control program to help eliminate *Feral Cats within the site and
surrounding estates. Appropriate method of *Feral Cat control within the area includes
deploying cage traps.
Feral Rodents
*Black Rat and *House Mouse populations appear to be at a medium level which can
contribute to a decline in populations of terrestrial fauna species and bird species & their
eggs. Both species of introduced rodent were sampled in Elliot traps and probably provide a
food source for predatory bird species (especially birds of prey and owls). *Black Rat control
needs to be adopted within the site which will help secure threatened breeding birds, their
eggs and chicks from this feral menace. Appropriate method of feral rodent control within
the site includes deploying cage traps.
*European Rabbit
No *European Rabbits were found to occur along the site or surrounding area.
3.6.6.2
Habitat changing weeds
Small to medium out-breaks of habitat changing weed species are occurring along the site
and are mainly found along the raised fill sites. Such weeds are currently changing some
aspects of critical fauna habitat and will cause a decline in the health of the natural
180
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
ecosystems over time. The most serious infestations which are changing indigenous
habitats include: *Box Thorn, *Apple of Sodom, *Spear Thistle, *Cape Ivy,* willow sp.
*Morning Glory, *Blue Periwinkle, *Fennel, *poplar sp, *fig sp, *English Blackberry. *Kikuyu
and other weedy grasses. Most of the habitat-changing weed outbreaks have the potential
to take over causing large changes and destruction of essential habitats. Consequently a
large reduction in fauna population densities and species diversity will occur.
This picture shows extensive *Box Thorn invasion along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road land fill site. Photo M. Legg 2014.
No current weeding programs are being conducted by MPS contractors and large patches of
*Box Thorn and other weed species are spreading through-out. Some fauna species have
adapted to these weed species and removal of them needs to be staged over a five to ten
year period. Weeds being used as habitat by birds and possums must be replaced with
indigenous shrubs.
3.6.6.3
Relative importance of key habitats
The site was once a part of the northern-western section of Tootgarook Wetland before it
was used as a landfill site. A large area has now been filled in and the raised fill sites are
being infested with several habitat changing weed species which are spreading through-out.
Several fauna species have adapted to the weed patches and utilize them to either feed,
roost or breed within.
181
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The swamp vegetation (especially EVC Tall Marsh) adjacent to the land fill site retains
important habitat for state and regionally threatened fauna species and is used as breeding
sites. The EPBC listed Australasian Bittern was observed adjacent to the southern edge of the
eastern boundary of this site and bittern habitat along the boundary is quite extensive.
Small populations of FFG listed Swamp Skinks were found to inhabit the edges of the raised
fill site, especially the edges that retain tussocks and weedy grasses. Swamp Skinks were
also observed at the base of some Gahnia tussocks. The state threatened Southern Toadlet
is also a breeding resident of the site, especially in areas that becomes inundated during
early winter. The sites habitats are extremely important sites for the future survival of
threatened and endangered species within Tootgarook Wetland.
This photo shows the important EVC Tall Marsh and swamp habitats along the eastern boundary of Truemans Road Land fill site.
Photo M. Legg 2014.
Future habitat restoration projects need to incorporate the deployment of habitat logs along
the raised sloped edges of the fill sites along with the planting of indigenous flora species
especially understorey grasses and sedges.
3.6.6.4
Bio-links from the study site to surrounding vegetation
The site is an important section of remaining habitat found along the northern section of
Tootgarook Wetland. It links Tootgarook Wetlands with other parts of the wetland, Hiscock
Road Reserve and to the south Boneo Park (Rob McNaught’s property).
182
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The links between this site and the above mentioned reserve & private property help habitat
specific fauna to move between and breed within.
3.6.6.5
FEIS assessments
During this survey Broad Vegetation Types (BVT) grasslands, scrub (wet) and wetlands &
swamps were assessed within the site using the FEIS rapid assessment tool. This is an
assessment of habitat specific fauna species that quickly disappear when their habitat
changes at a rapid rate. The assessments along the site indicated that 55% of FEIS’s were
present within grasslands, 38% of FEIS‟s were present within coastal scrub and 50% within
wetlands & swamps. This indicates a phase 2-4 extinction rate of FEIS’s within BVT’s
assessed along the site.
Assessments indicted that large tree hollows (usually associate with eucalypts and swamp
scrub stands) are absent. Terrestrial habitat logs with small hollows are also absent. Ongoing and integrated feral control programs need to continue across the landscape in order
to maintain and increase fauna species diversity and population densities within Tootgarook
Wetland.
3.6.6.6
Monitoring FEIS’s and population densities along the study site
A monitoring program within the site for FEIS species including threatened species (found to
be present) needs to be developed to measure fluctuations in population densities and loss
of species. Such species considered for future monitoring projects are listed in tables 60, 61
& 62 of this report.
183
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.6.7
Recommendations for the Truemans Road landfill site
The following management recommendations are set out to guide MPS land managers in the
conservation of threatened and other fauna and their habitat integrated to the same
standard as employed at Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve. Management for conservation
values should extend further into the adjoining 50m wide strip of the land fill site.
x
Continue to conduct fauna surveys every five years and carry out yearly
monitoring of FEIS’s, threatened indigenous fauna species and feral species
using Scout-guard cameras and analysing fox scats.
x
Through-out the fill site remove weeds over a staged period, especially *Box
Thorn as several fauna species utilise its cover or fruits. Revegetate using
indigenous plants and replace weeds with prickly bushes, Coast Banksia and
indigenous understorey plants.
x
Deploy habitat logs with small hollows along the edges and through-out the
raised fill sites.
x
Recommendations for fauna species contained in Action Plans and Recovery
Plans under the FFG Act 1988 be sought to be implemented within the
reserve.
That the area of the land fill recommended to be managed for conservation should:x
have constructed a suitable fauna friendly permitter fence and interpretative
signage to mark the land fill area recommended to be managed for
conservation purposes.
x
Be protected from any further dumping and spreading of imported material
x
Conservation management including pest plant and animal control be
integrated with existing MPS management of Sanctuary Park Bushland
Reserve.
x
Monitor inundated areas of this site for water quality associated with ongoing environmental monitoring by MW/MPS
x
Be subject to a review of existing planning controls and opportunities to
recognise the presence of EPBC and FFG listed species.
x
Include the site in the MPS feral control programs with on-going focus on
*Red Fox, *Feral Cat and *Black Rat.
x
Council as the managers of the property should develop and install signage
interpreting the environmental, cultural and hydro-geological functions of
184
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
the land parcel at a prominent location possibly at the Truemans Road
entrance.
x
Address key threats to habitat and bio-diversity.
Management actions should include the following and during weeding projects follow these
simple rules:
o
Don’t spray herbicide in known Southern Toadlet habitat.
o
Conduct weeding in sections and span the process over five or so
years
o
Start from the good areas and work outwards and control invading
weeds on the edges.
o
Only remove woody weeds or conduct control burns during the nonbird breeding season.
o
Leave if Eastern Yellow Robins or other birds are nesting.
o
Allow natural regeneration to occur.
o
If ringtail possum dreys or bird nests occur in weeds then ring-bark
with-out poisoning and follow-up after a year.
185
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7 Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
3.7.1
Study site
The site is located in the parish of Rosebud West, is situated between Tootgarook Sports
Reserve and Elizabeth Avenue and runs along the original Chinaman’s Creek route.
The site is approximately 1.28+ hectares in size and the location is Melways reference
number 169 E5 to G4. The study site comprises the former route of Chinaman’s Creek which
originally drained the wetland into Port Phillip via an extensive sand dune system, EVC Tall
Marsh, swamp vegetation and small patches of woodland & swamp scrub.
For this survey the reserve was been divided up into three reaches and include:
x
Reach 1- Ibis Grove to Swans Way
x
Reach 2- Swans Way to Eliza Street
x
Reach 3- Eliza Way to Elizabeth Street
Refer to map 10 for locations of the three reaches along the reserve.
3.7.2
Ecological Vegetation Classes
Six Ecological Vegetation Classes (EVC’s) are present within the site and includes EVC’s (002)
Coast Banksia Woodland, (053) Freshwater Swamp Scrub, (132) South Gippsland Plains
Grassland, (653) Aquatic Herbland, (656) Brackish Wetland and (821) Tall Marsh. Other
EVC’s are probably apparent but have not been mapped at present.
The diversity of EVC’s constitutes different habitat types which provide homes for a medium
diversity of fauna species. Majority of these EVC’s are of medium to high quality apart from
the Coast Banksia Woodland which has infestations of habitat changing weeds. The EVC’s
that have been determined within the site and their status are displayed in the table below.
Table 64: EVC’s present within Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve.
EVC No
EVC’s
Status within Gippsland
Plain Bioregion
002
053
132
653
656
821
Coast Banksia Woodland
Freshwater Swamp Scrub
South Gippsland Plains Grassland
Aquatic Herbland
Brackish Wetland
Tall Marsh
Vulnerable
Endangered
Endangered
Endangered
Rare
No listing
186
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.3
Fauna detected within the study site
A total of 71 species of fauna were recorded within the site during this survey. Of these 63
species are native and eight species are introduced. These consist of one species of
Decapod Crustacean, no species of fish, five species of amphibians, 11 species of reptiles
(of which eight species are lizards and three species are snakes), 44 species of birds (of
these 40 are native species and four species are introduced) and ten species of mammals of
which four species are introduced.
187
Locations of the three reaches within Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
MAP 10
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
188
KEY
Reach 1
Reach 2
Reach 3
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.4
Results of field work conducted within the study site during this
survey (including Elliot traps, scat analysis, bird population
surveys,
spotlighting, bat detection, FEIS assessments and observations).
3.7.4.1
Bird species and population density survey results
TABLE 65: Bird species and population densities detected for each month at the Tern Avenue Bushland
Reserve (First Reach – Ibis Grove to Swans Way), October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’ demotes species bred.
SPECIES
Buff-banded Rail
White-faced Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Silver Gull
Swamp Harrier
*Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Tawny Frogmouth
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willy Wagtail
Mudlark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australain Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
2B
2B
2
4B
4B
4
3
3
10+
9
10+
8
4
2
8
12
2
2
4
2
30+
8
20+
6
27
7
17
10+
30+
10+
12
30+
40+
8
20+
20+
6
20+
12
13
2
2
30+
20+
20+
10+
20+
30+
4
20+
4
3
30+
30+
20+
30+
20+
30+
3
20+
6
4
4
20+
20+
20+
10+
20+
30+
4
20+
4
2
3
6
6
8
8
6
4
3
3
6
6
7
11
4
4
5
4
6
30+
10+
20+
30+
10+
10+
20+
30+
3
12B
11
3
10+
6
2B
6
1
16B
12
1
16B
12
10+
20+
8
2B
7
2B
16B
6
20+
8
4
20+B
20+B
20+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
10+B
20+B
12B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+
35B
30+B
20+B
12B
20B
8
20+B
10+
30+
10+
30+
10+
10+
30+
6
20+
6
4B
4B
4B
2B
4B
4B
2B
4B
10B
4
4B
2B
8B
10B
2
4B
4B
4B
10+
2
10+B
30+B
40+B
10+B
30+B
40+B
10+B
30B+
40+B
10+B
30+B
25B
2
2
6
8
4
10+
12
2
20+
10+
20+
20+
20+
20+
40+
189
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
TABLE 66: Bird species and population densities detected for each month at the Tern Avenue Bushland
Reserve (Second Reach –Swans Way to Eliza Street), October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’
demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Buff-banded Rail
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Silver Gull
*Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Tawny Frogmouth
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrub-wren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Grey Fantail
Mudlark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Red-browed Finch
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
Oct
2013
Nov
Dec
Jan
2014
Feb
3
20+B
20+B
10+
10+
20+B
6
22
2B
2B
2B
3
10+
9
14B
12
20+
Mar
Apr
May
3
10+
8
3
12
8
12
4
11
2
8
4
3
12
4
4
5
10+
10+
10+
14
14
20+
4
4
4
7
9
6
10+
12
20+
3
2
2
6
6
8
11
5+
20+
14
20+
20+
6
6
3
5
20+
10+
6
2
10+B
10+B
16B
10+
10+B
10+B
5+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
5+B
20+B
10+B
12B
5+B
20+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+
10+
10+
10+
10+
10+
20+
10+
10+
10+
12
20+
4
3
2B
4B
4B
4B
4B
4B
4
4B
4B
6B
20+B
20+B
30+B
20+B
20+B
20+B
20+B
20+B
20+B
4B
4B
6B
6
4
20+B
20+B
20+B
20+
20+
20+
6
4
4
7
10+
16
20+
30+
10+
10
20+
20+
TABLE 67: Bird species and population densities detected for each month at the Tern Avenue Bushland
Reserve (Third Reach, Eliza Street to Elizabeth Avenue), October 2013 to May 2014 ‘B’
demotes when species bred.
SPECIES
Pacific Black Duck
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Masked Lapwing
Silver Gull
*Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-checked Honeyeater
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Oct
2013
Nov
4
4
Dec
Jan
2014
2B
2B
2B
3
4
20+B
20+B
10
20+B
30+B
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
10+
9
4
30+
10+
8
4
3
40+
5
20+
10+
8
12
4
4
36
3
20+
10+
2
8
4
2
3
28
5
10+
10+
6
10+
10+
20+
3
4
3
7
10+
10+
16
6
4
5
4
20+
10+
10+
10+
10+
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+B
10+
10+B
10+
10+
20+
10+
10+
20+
2B
2B
2B
2B
2B
2B
4B
4B
4
4
4
4
3
190
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
SPECIES
Oct
2013
Little Raven
Silvereye
*Common Blackbird
*Common Myna
*Common Starling
3.7.4.2
20+B
20+B
30+B
Nov
20+B
20+B
30+B
Dec
Jan
2014
20+B
20+B
30+B
20+B
20+B
20+B
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
10+
20+
20+
20+
6
20+
20+
20+
40+
20+
20+
20+
30+
3
10+
16
30+
30+
Elliot trap survey results
TABLE 68: Fauna sampled in Elliot traps deployed through-out Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve,
February 2014.
Species
Date
collected
Number
detected
Swamp Skink
17-02-14
18-02-14
16-02-14
16-02-14
17-02-14
18-02-14
16-02-14
17-02-14
19-02-14
17-02-14
18-02-14
1m
1m & 1f
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
Swamp Rat
*Black Rat
*House Mouse
3.7.4.3
Area detected
Transect 1 trap 2.
Transect 1, traps 1 & 4.
Transect 1, traps 3, 4 & 6.
Transect 2, trap 7.
Transect 2, traps 1 & 8.
Transect 1, trap 11.
Transect 1, trap 12.
Transect 2, trap 3.
Transect 1, traps 1 & 3.
Transect 1, traps 8.
Transect 2, traps 3. 9 & 14.
Feral predator scat analysis
TABLE 69: Mammal hairs identified in fox and cat scats collected through-out Tern Avenue Bushland
Reserve, November 2013 to April 2014.
Predator Species
scat
*Fox 1
*Fox 2
*Fox 3
*Cat 1
*Cat 2
3.7.4.4
Date collected
03-02-14
02-02-14
18-03-14
18-03-14
24-04-14
Non mammal remains
Mammal hairs analyzed within scat
Nil
Nil
Berries
Feathers
Feathers
Ringtail Possum
Swamp Rat.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil
Spotlight walk results
TABLE 70: Fauna observed during spotlighting throughout Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve,
December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
Amphibians
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
50+
20+
20+
10+
5+
20+
All 3 reaches.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
Reaches 1 & 2.
191
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Birds
Masked Lapwing
Tawny Frogmouth
Mammals
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Bat sps
*Fox
*Feral Cat
3.7.4.5
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
30+
20+
20+
20+
10+
10+
All 3 reaches.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
12-02-14
2
4
4
2
Reach 3.
As above.
As above
Reach 1.
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18-12-13
12-02-14
28-04-14
4
3
5
16
8
7
3 sps
3 sps
3 sps
2
1
2
4
3
4
Trees through-out all 3 reaches
As above
As above.
As above.
As above.
As above
Flying through-out.
As above.
As above
Open areas
As above.
As above.
Through-out.
As above.
As above.
Anabat 2 Bat Detector results
TABLE 71: Micro bats recorded on the Anabat II Bat Detector through-out Tern Avenue Bushland
Reserve, December 2013 to April 2014.
Species
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Little Forest Bat
3.7.4.6
Date
Number
detected
Area detected
18/12/13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18/12/13
12-02-14
28-04-14
18/12/13
12-02-14
28-04-14
11
18
19
25
11
36
4
3
7
Flying above vegetation.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above.
As above
As above.
As above
As above.
Scout-guard camera deployment
No Scout-guard cameras were deployed at this site.
192
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.4.7
Current status of Broad Vegetation Class ecosystems within the
study site using FEIS rapid assessment tool
After accessing within the site using the FEIS rapid assessment tool, the tables below list the
FEIS’s that still occur and the species which have disappeared within Broad Vegetation
Classes across the site. A score is also given at a rating from 1 to 5 (which relates to which
extinction phase the site is currently experiencing) depending on loss of FEIS’s.
Table 72: FEIS Assessment of BVT, Woodlands within Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve.
Decapod
Crustaceans
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. Of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
Engaeus sp
Tree Dragon
Whites Skink
Southern Water Skink
Eastern three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
McCoy’s Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
or
Common Blue-tongue
White-lipped Snake
Painted Button Quail
Buff-banded Rail
Southern Boobook
Powerful Owl
Eastern Rosella
Crimson Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Varied Sitella
White-throated Treecreeper
White-eared Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Crested Shrike-tit
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Rufous Fantail
Grey Fantail
Satin Flycatcher
Grey Currawong
Mistletoebird
Stubble Quail
Brush Bronzewing
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Sugar Glider
Feathertail Glider
Black Wallaby
Sothern Forest Bat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
37 of the 48
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from woodlands
along the
reserve.
KEY
Red writing
indicates
species that
have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the
reserve based
on this survey.
.
23% of FEIS’s
still remain
which indicates
a phase 4-5
extinction rate
within the
woodlands
along the
reserve.
193
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 73: FEIS assessment of scrub (wet) within Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve.
Decapod Crustaceans,
Amphibians and
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
No. of FEIS’s present
and extinction phase
Engaeus sps
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Southern Water Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Nankeen Night Heron
Brush Bronzewing
Eastern Rosella
Sacred Kingfisher
Southern Emu-wren
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Rufous Fantail
Grey Currawong
Short-beaked Echidna
Agile Antechinus
Dusky Antechinus
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Long-nosed Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Large Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
22 of the 33 FEIS’s
have disappeared from
the site.
KEY
Red writing indicates
species that have
disappeared from the site
based on this survey.
Table 74:
34% of FEIS’s still
remain which indicates
a phase 4 extinction
rate within the scrub
through-out the site.
FEIS Assessment of BVT: Wetlands & Swamps within Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve.
No. of FEIS’s
present and
extinction
phase
Decapod
Crustaceans
& Fish
Amphibians
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
Engaeus sp
Spotted Galaxias
Dwarf Galaxias
Victorian Smooth Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Growling Grass Frog
Common Longnecked Tortoise
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Lewin’s Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Ballions Crake
Spotless Crake
Australasian Bittern
Nankeen Night Heron
Great Egret
Royal Spoonbill
Southern Emu-wren
White-fronted Chat
Clamorous Reed Warbler
White-footed Dunnart
Southern Brown Bandicoot
Black Wallaby
Water Rat
Swamp Rat
KEY
Red writing
indicates species
that have either
disappeared or
become extinct
within the site
27% of FEIS’s
still remain which
indicates a
phase
4 extinction rate
within the
wetlands and
swamps
through-out the
site.
based on this
survey.
3.7.5
3.7.5.1
19 of the 26
FEIS’s have
disappeared
from the
wetlands and
swamps within
the site.
Significant fauna of Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
Significant fauna detected throughout the reserve during this survey.
Nationally significant species listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act
1999 were not detected during this survey. However one species detected is listed as
internationally migratory under the EPBC Act. Four State significant species were recorded
194
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
during this study and one of those species is listed under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act
1988 as threatened. In addition, a further nine species recorded are considered to be of
regional significance and four species recorded are considered to be of high local
significance. The remaining native fauna utilizing the site are considered to be at a local
significance level due to large population and habitat losses within the local area
(Mornington Peninsula Shire).
3.7.5.2
Ecological significance of the study site.
The low lying areas through-out the reserve are extensive breeding sites for the state
threatened Southern Toadlet. EVC Tall Marsh and wetland vegetation supports small
populations of the FFG listed Swamp Skink and state threatened Glossy Grass Skink.
On the basis of significant flora & fauna species and endangered EVC’s occurring within the
site, the site can be considered to be of state significance.
3.7.5.3
Habitat significance
The vegetation communities within the site contain important habitat for fauna species,
especially threatened species at a state and regional level. The swamp shrub communities
support a low diversity of arboreal mammals and a medium diversity of avifauna. The
terrestrial vegetation supports a medium diversity of terrestrial fauna and scrub-dwelling
avifauna. The EVC Tall Marsh and other wetland vegetation supports state and regionally
threatened bird, reptile and amphibian species along with wetland flora communities. Some
feral species (such-as Feral Cats,*Red Fox and *Black Rat) are threatening some of the fauna
diversity within the site and are currently being controlled within the surrounding area.
3.7.5.4
Defining significant species
Fauna in the site were classed according to their high local, regional and state levels. As lists
of regionally and locally significant fauna aren’t available from relevant government
authorities, those significant taxa were assessed by the author from his previous records
within the bioregion and Mornington Peninsula Shire.
Key to defining significant species
Signif
N
S
R
HL
DSE
FFG
Significant/status of species is designated by:
National
State
Regional
High Local
Advisory list of threatened Vertebrate in Victoria-2013 (NRE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guaranteed Act 1988
195
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Cen
End
Vul
LR
NT
DD
Ls
M
Un
MC
LC
C
Lim
Action Plan approved by Environmental Australia
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
International Treaties, C=China (CAMBA) and J=Japan (JAMBA).
critically endangered
endangered
vulnerable
lower risk-near threatened
Near Threatened
data deficient
Listed
Migratory under the EPBC Act
Uncommon
Moderately Common
Locally Common
Common
Limited
TABLE 75: Significant fauna detected throughout Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve during this survey.
Common Name
Amphibians
Southern Toadlet
Reptiles
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Birds
Buff-banded Rail
Swamp Harrier
Musk Lorikeet
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Mammals
Micro bats occurring throughout.
Swamp Rat
Scientific Name
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Sig
DSE.
S
Vul
Bassian duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lissolepis coventryi
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellina
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Australeps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
R
R
S
S
R
R
HL
R
MC
MC
Vul
Vul
MC
MC
C
Un
Gallirallus philippensis
Circus approximans
Glossopsitta concinna
Hirundapus caudacutus
Dacelo novaehollandiae
Acrocephalus stentoreus
R
HL
HL
S
HL
R
Un
Un
MC
Vul
Un
Un
Tadarida, Chalinolobus &
Vespadelus sps.
Rattus lutreolus
R
C
R
C
FFG.
Ls
ActPl
EPBC
TR
Yes
M
Map 11 below shows the locations of state threatened fauna species which were identified
within the reserve during this survey. Please note that small flocks of White-throated
Needletail were observed flying over the reserve and didn’t land within. This means they do
not appear on map 11.
196
CJ
Reach 1
Reach 2
KEY
Reserve boundaries
Southern Toadlet
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
197
Locations of State significant fauna species identified within
Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
MAP 11
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.6
Discussion
3.7.6.1
Indigenous Fauna
3.7.6.1.1
Decapod Crustacean
One species of Decapod Crustacean was identified within the reserve and were found to
inhabit the drainage line that retained significant vegetation cover such-as EVC’s Tall Marsh
and Aquatic Herbland. Within these sites typical mud chimneys were observed on the soil
surface (see photo below).
Typical chimney construction of mud at the base of this Engaeus species burrow entrance at Tern Avenue reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
3.7.6.1.2
Amphibians
Medium to low population densities of Common Froglet, Southern Bullfrog, Verreaux’s Tree
Frog and Southern Brown Tree Frog were found to inhabit the vegetation communities along
the reserve. The state threatened Southern Toadlet was heard calling along reaches 1 & 2
from low-lying areas. The population densities appear to be at a medium level.
Rarer species which weren’t sampled during this survey and are probably extinct within the
reserve include: Victorian Smooth Froglet, Haswell’s Froglet, Spotted Marsh Frog, Stripped
Marsh Frog and Growling Grass Frog. It is unlikely that future surveys along the site would
identify these species.
198
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.6.1.3
Reptiles
Through-out the reserve reptile species and population densities appeared to be at a
reasonably medium diversity and at a low to medium population density level. Low
population densities are probably due to the skinny nature of the reserve and high predation
by domestic and feral cats.
Some habitat changing weed species are present and posing some impacts upon available
essential understorey habitat. The reptiles identified during this survey period and their
habitats are discussed below.
Reptiles identified along within the reserve include lizards and snakes. Along section 1 three
FFG listed Swamp Skinks were sampled in Elliot traps and others were observed sunning
themselves at the base of vegetation. Swamp Skinks within reach 1 appear to be at a low
population density while along reaches 2 & 3 none were sampled. Along reach 1, the state
threatened Glossy Grass Skink was observed under fallen debris and occasionally under
dumped rubbish. Populations appear to be also at a low density along reach 1 and were not
sampled along reaches 2 & 3. Other small skinks observed included: Eastern Three-lined
Skink, Delicate Skink, Garden Skink and Weasel Skink. All were observed either in the
understorey or found under dumped rubbish and fallen debris. The occasional Blotched &
Common Blue-tongues were observed in grasses along reach 1 & 2 and appear to be at a
low population density levels.
Blotched Blue-tongue sunning itself along reach 1 at Tern Avenue reserve. Photo M. Legg 2013.
199
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Three snake species were observed during the survey period and include: Lowland
Copperhead, White-lipped Snake and Tiger Snake. All were observed along reach 1 either
under fallen debris or while sunning themselves next to vegetation (see photo below). All
three species population densities appear to be at low levels.
Tiger Snake photographed sunning itself on dumped grass clippings along reach 1 at Tern Avenue reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
3.7.6.1.4
Birds
A low to medium diversity of birds inhabits the various habitats found along the reserve and
can be divided into three categories:
x
wetland birds
x
woodland birds
x
Introduced birds
Wetland birds
During this survey wetland bird species identified along the reserve were observed either
flying overhead or found to inhabit the various vegetation communities. Wetland birds
identified flying overhead include: Australian Pelican, Australian White Ibis, Straw-necked
Ibis and Silver Gull.
200
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Wetland birds that were observed either breeding or feeding along the reserve include:
Pacific Black Duck, Buff-banded Rail, White-faced Heron and Masked Lapwing. Majority of
these species either bred along the reserve or nearby.
Future habitat restoration projects and removal of habitat changing weeds should be staged
over a few years in order for rail & crake species etc. to be able to adapt and adjust. Weeds
should be replaced with indigenous grasses and sedges.
Buff-banded Rail and White-faced Heron were regularly observed feeding along reach 1 of Tern Avenue reserve. Photos M. Legg 2014.
Woodland birds
Species of woodland birds were found to inhabit the woodlands, scrub, reeds and
understorey habitats found through-out the site and are discussed below.
The only bird of prey observed along the reserve was a Swamp Harrier which was
occasionally observed flying over reach 1 of the reserve and nearby Tootgarook Wetland
Reserve, while hunting for food. The Swamp Harrier breeds in the greater Tootgarook
Wetland.
Occasionally small flocks of Galahs, Cockatoos, Eastern Rosellas and larger flocks of
Rainbow Lorikeets and Musk Lorikeets were observed flying overhead or observed feeding in
the woodlands along reaches 1 & 2 or in eucalypts planted next to the netball courts.
Migratory birds within Australasia arrived along the reserve during spring and include
Shining Bronze-Cuckoo, Grey Fantail, Welcome Swallow, Clamorous Reed Warbler and
Silvereye. Majority of the species mentioned above bred along reaches 1 & 2 and left for
northern or eastern Australia during autumn post breeding. After breeding the Silvereye
migrates from Tasmania back to the mainland especially to the Mornington Peninsula where
increase population densities were observed during late summer and autumn. Along reach 1
201
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
and within EVC Tall Marsh, the Clamorous Reed Warbler bred within Common Reed patches.
The cuckoo is parasitic and lay its eggs in the nests of honeyeaters, finches, wrens &
thornbills and migrate to New Guinea after breeding.
Clamorous Reed Warbler photographed within Common Reed patches along reach 1 at Tern Avenue reserve.
Photos M. Legg 2014.
During spotlight and day walks occasional Tawny Frogmouth was observed either roosting
or hunting from woodland patches along reach 1.
Small flocks of White-throated Needletail were observed flying overhead and feeding on
insects during summer months. They breed in Korea and migrate to Australia during
summer where they can be observed in aerial flight feeding on insects usually in front of
summer storms.
An occasional pair of Laughing Kookaburra was observed stalking prey from woodland
patches along reach 1 of the reserve.
Superb Fairy-wren, White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill are common permanent
breeding residents of thickets, undergrowth and canopies along reaches 1 & 2 of the
reserve.
Small flocks of Spotted Pardalote were observed during autumn feeding in the canopies of
swamp scrub and woodlands along the reserve.
Six species of honeyeaters were recorded throughout the reserve, mainly within the swamp
scrub and woodland areas. These include the Red Wattlebird, Little Wattlebird, Spiny-
202
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
cheeked Honeyeater, Noisy Miner, New Holland Honeyeater and Eastern Spinebill. All species
are either breeding residents or breed nearby to the reserve.
Pairs of Golden Whistlers were observed along reach 1 during autumn but bred elsewhere.
Common open country birds such-as Willy Wagtail, Magpie-lark, Grey Butcherbird,
Australian Magpie, Australian Raven and Little Raven are common to rare visitors or
breeding residents along the reserve.
During autumn small flocks of Red-browed Finch were observed feeding along the ground
on grass seeds at reaches 1 & 2.
Introduced Birds
Four species of introduced birds inhabit the reserve and include: *Spotted Turtle-Dove,
*Common Blackbird, *Common Starling and *Common Myna. All are breeding resident along
all reaches of the reserve. The *Common Blackbird and *Common Starling are prolific
spreaders of noxious and environmental weed seed.
3.7.6.1.4.1
Comparisons of bird species diversity per month
Results from the graph below indicate that bird species diversity along reach 1 of the
reserve was the lowest (21) during October & December and peaked at 30 species during
February. Bird species diversity along reach 2 of the reserve was the lowest (14) during
October and January and peaked at 24 species during May. Bird species diversity along reach
3 of the reserve was the lowest (11) during October and December and peaked at 21 species
during May.
This can be attributed to post breeding period when bird species tend to move around from
breeding sites to other habitat patches adjacent to the reserve or within the greater area.
The table below lists the fluctuations in bird species diversity, within each reach, along the
reserve and during each month of the survey period.
203
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Graph 12: Fluctuations in bird species diversity along reaches 1, 2 & 3 of Tern Avenue Bushland
Reserve over an eight month period during this survey.
35
30
25
20
Section 1
15
Section 2
10
Section3
5
0
Oct
3.7.6.1.5
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Mammals
During this survey a low diversity of mammal species was recorded along the reserve. Other
species that should occur but were found to be absent include: Short-beaked Echidna,
White-footed Dunnart, Agile Antechinus, Dusky Antechinus, Long-nosed Bandicoot,
Southern Brown Bandicoot, Common Wombat, Eastern Grey Kangaroo, Black Rat and Water
Rat. Some of these species were known to occur within the area over the last three decades.
The mammals recorded during this survey are discussed below.
Marsupials
Nocturnal possums encountered during the survey period include the Common Brushtail
Possum and Common Ringtail Possum. Both species were observed during spotlight walks
conducted along the reserve. Brushtail possums and ringtail possums were observed along
all three reaches either feeding in the canopies, heard calling when disturbed and found in
dreys which are constructed within thickets. Juveniles of ringtail possums were observed in
autumn.
Placental Mammals
Three nights of recording micro-bat echolocation calls were conducted throughout this
survey. Micro-bats were seen on warm nights flying past the light beam of a torch, catching
and eating insects while in flight. Future micro-bat recordings could result in further species
identification, as some species are common one month and then absent the next. All
species of micro-bats that occur along the reserve are hollow dependent, nocturnal, and eat
three times their body weight in insects each night. Most species are feeding visitors to the
site and roost or breed elsewhere.
204
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Swamp Rat populations appear to be at a stable level and were regularly sampled in Elliot
traps mainly along reaches 1 & 2. Here they occupy dense understory grass patches whether
they be indigenous or weedy and don’t become inundated with water. Underneath this
vegetation they excavate runways and build nest chambers at the end in burrows up to one
meter long. Such activity is apparent throughout their distribution along the reserve.
3.7.6.1.5.1
Feral mammals
*Red Fox
*Red Fox population densities appear to be low through-out the reserve and surrounding
area due to the MPS feral predator control program which has greatly reduced the fox
population’s through-out Tootgarook Wetland and surrounding areas. The occasional fox
scat was mainly found through-out the reserve. The MPS feral predator control program
should include the road reserve as part of its feral control program. Appropriate method of
fox control within the reserve includes deploying foothold traps.
*Feral Cat
Occasional *Feral and Domestic Cat or their scats were encountered along the reserve and
population densities appear to be at a low to medium level. These cats were and are
probably residents of the adjacent estates either side of the reserve. Cats cause large-scale
destruction of lizard and small bird populations and need urgent control. The MPS feral
predator control program should include the reserve as part of its feral control program to
help eliminate *Feral Cats along the reserve and surrounding estates. Appropriate method of
*Feral Cat control along the road reserve includes deploying cage traps.
Feral Rodents
*Black Rat and *House Mouse populations appear to be at a medium level which can
contribute to a decline in populations of terrestrial fauna species and bird species & their
eggs. Both species of introduced rodent were sampled in Elliot traps and probably provide a
food source for predatory bird species. *Black Rat control needs to be adopted along the
reserve which will help secure threatened breeding birds, their eggs and chicks from this
feral menace. Appropriate method of feral rodent control along the reserve includes
deploying cage traps.
*European Rabbit
No *European Rabbits were found to occur within the reserve or surrounding area.
205
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.6.2
Habitat changing weeds
Several habitat changing weed species are present within the reserve and are found along all
three reaches, changing some aspects of critical fauna habitat that remains. Most
infestations are occurring along the edges and within vegetation communities.
The most serious infestations which are changing indigenous habitats include:* willow sps,*
Mirror bush, *Desert Ash, *Southern Mahogany, *Monterey Pine, *English Ivy, *Arum Lily,
*Cape Ivy, *Fennel, *Privot, *Cedar Wattle, *Sweet Pittosporum, *Prickly Pear, *Hemlock,
*Spear Thistle, *Sallow Wattle, *Kikuyu & other weedy grasses and *English Blackberry.
All of the habitat-changing weed outbreaks have the potential to take over causing large
changes and destruction of essential habitats. Consequently a large reduction in fauna
population densities and species diversity will occur.
Recent habitat restoration projects by MPS council along reaches 1 & 2 has seen the removal
of several of the habitat changing weed species and indigenous plants have re-grown. Large
infestations of blackberry and willows have been targeted and are being removed over a few
years.
Weed species are also providing habitat for some fauna species such-as rails, wrens and
skinks etc. and are only being removed over an extended period of time. Weeds being used
as habitat by fauna species must also be replaced with indigenous terrestrial plants such-as
grasses, sedges and prickly shrubs.
*Willows and *Cape Ivy are currently being controlled along reaches 1 & 2 at Tern Avenue reserve. Photos M. Legg 2014.
206
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
*Cotoneaster and *English Blackberry dominate these sites at Tern Avenue reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
3.7.6.3
Relative importance of key habitats
The reserve is part of an important section of the northern area of Tootgarook Wetland that
still retains significant vegetation and habitat. The site is the original Chinaman’s Creek
drainage line that use to drain into Port Phillip. The dense reed and swamp scrub habitats
within supports breeding pairs of regionally threatened wetland bird species.
Populations of FFG listed Swamp Skinks and state threatened Glossy Grass Skink were also
found to inhabit these areas. The state threatened Southern Toadlet is also a breeding
resident along reaches 1 & 2, especially in sites that become inundated during early winter.
Herbicide spraying must be limited in toadlet habitat so as to not harm the population that
resides.
The reserve which is long but thin in nature is an extremely important site for the future
survival of threatened species within Tootgarook Wetland and Rosebud West areas.
207
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
The picture above shows critical Southern Toadlet breeding habitat found along reach 2 at Tern Avenue reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
Stands of swamp scrub and Coast Banksia provide homes for possums and a variety of bird
species while fallen trunks and terrestrial logs are absent. Restoration projects need to
include the deployment of habitat logs with small hollows along reaches 1 & 2.
The large patches of EVC Tall Marsh (picture below) dominated by Common Reed are mainly
found along reach 1 and to a lesser degree along reach 2 of the reserve. These are
important breeding & feeding site for Buff-banded Rail and the migratory Clamorous Reed
Warbler. Both species has been greatly reduced in population densities over the last few
decades. However over the last five years populations appear to be recovering, especially in
areas that have had on-going feral control programs conducted.
This photo shows the important Tall Marsh habitats along reach 1 at Tern Avenue reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
208
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.6.4Bio-links from Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve to surrounding vegetation
The reserve is relatively long but narrow and is still an important section of remaining
habitat along the northern section of Tootgarook Wetland. It helps to links the western edge
of Tootgarook Wetland with the rest of the wetland and nearby Tootgarook Wetlands
Reserve. However the link between the reserve and the wetlands reserve to the east is
insufficient and urgently needs to be widened with understory plantings such-as poas and
sedges to be incorporated within and along the edges (pictured below). Currently this link is
limiting the movement of habitat specific fauna species and with the deployment of habitat
logs & additional understorey plantings will help to achieve a more sufficient habitat link.
The biolink above at Tern Avenue reserve needs to be widened, additional plantings and habitat logs deployed. Photos M. Legg 2014.
3.7.6.5
FEIS assessments
During this survey Broad Vegetation Types (BVT) woodlands, scrub (wet) and wetlands &
swamps were assessed along the reserve using the FEIS rapid assessment tool. This is an
assessment of habitat specific fauna species that quickly disappear when their habitat
changes at a rapid rate. The assessments along the reserve indicated that 23% of FEIS’s were
present within woodlands, 34% of FEIS‟s were present within scrub and 27% within wetlands
& swamps. This indicates a phase 4 extinction rate of FEIS’s within BVT’s assessed along the
reserve.
Assessments indicted that large tree hollows (usually associate with eucalypts) are rare and
only found in scrub and occasional banksia within reaches 1 & 2 of the reserve. Terrestrial
logs with small hollows are absent and urgently need to be deployed. On-going and
integrated feral control programs need to continue across the landscape in order to
maintain and increase fauna species diversity and population densities within Tootgarook
Wetland.
209
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
3.7.6.6
Monitoring FEIS’s and population densities within the reserve
A monitoring program along the reserve for certain FEIS species including threatened
species (found to be present) needs to be developed to measure fluctuations in population
densities and loss of species. Such species considered for future monitoring projects are
listed in tables 72, 73 & 74 of this report.
3.7.7
Recommendations for Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
The following management recommendations are set out to help the study site’s managers
to manage the fauna and habitat more appropriately in accordance with flora and fauna
requirements.
x
Continue to conduct fauna surveys every five years and carry out yearly
monitoring of FEIS’s, threatened indigenous fauna species and feral species
using Scout-guard cameras and analysing fox scats.
x
Include the reserve in the MPS feral control programs with on-going focus on
*Red Fox, *Feral Cat and *Black Rat.
x
Repair the bio-link adjacent to the netball courts and between the reserve
and Tootgarook Wetland Reserve. Make it wider by planting out understorey
grasses & sedges and deploying habitat logs.
x
Council as the managers of the reserve should develop and install signage
interpreting the environmental, cultural and hydro-geological functions of
the land parcel at prominent locations along each reach.
x
Council to conduct integrated management of this reserve with the other
sites discussed through-out this report. Continue to weed and regenerate
reaches 1 & 2 and conduct restoration projects along reach 3. EVC’s such-as
Coast Banksia Woodland, Aquatic Herbland and Freshwater Swamp Scrub to
be prioritised during rehabilitation programs. Deploy habitat logs with small
hollows along all reaches.
x
MPS to engage adjoining land holders to manage remnant indigenous
vegetation on private properties.
x
MPS to review the potential encroachment and land management onto the
reserve.
x
MPS to establish a friends group of the Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve along
all three reaches.
210
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
x
Educate the public and implement the 24/7 cat curfew with adjoining
neighbours.
x
Council to review existing fuel reduction practices along all reaches.
x
Address key threats to habitat and bio-diversity.
Management actions should include the following and during weeding projects follow these
simple rules:
o
Don’t spray herbicide in known Southern Toadlet habitat.
o
Conduct weeding in sections and span the process over five or so
years.
o
Start from the good areas and work outwards and control invading
weeds on the edges.
o
Only remove woody weeds or conduct control burns during the nonbird breeding season.
o
Leave if Eastern Yellow Robins or other birds are nesting.
o
Allow natural regeneration to occur.
o
If ringtail possum dreys or bird nests occur in weeds then ring-bark
with-out poisoning and follow-up after a year.
211
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
4.0
Overall recommendations for the seven study sites
The following are recommendations for the study area to help address biodiversity issues
witnessed during this survey.
1.
The study area’s sites contain a wide range of terrestrial and semi-permanent
wetland habitats which supports a diverse range of EVC’s that are assessed as
endangered in the bio-region. The seven study sites also support a diverse and
significant range of indigenous fauna species listed under commonwealth and state
biodiversity acts. A recommendation is made, that collectively, these sites are of
national and state significance and should be protected accordingly.
2.
Two of the study sites support the nationally endangered Australasian Bittern (listed
as endangered on both the EPBC Act 1999 and FFG Act 1988) and needs the full
protection they deserve. A monitoring program designed to protect and monitor
breeding and foraging sites needs to be immediately implemented. Considering
there is only an estimated 800 to 1200 individuals left in Australia and are currently
on the decline.
3.
Adopt management recommendations from the Australasian Bittern Recovery and
Action Plans and Implement through-out the greater Tootgarook Swamp.
4.
The Tall Marsh EVC within Tootgarook Wetlands appears to be the bitterns preferred
breeding and foraging habitat and requires full protection on both private and public
land including at 92 Elizabeth Avenue.
5.
The Tootgarook Wetland and its unique range of habitats support a high diversity of
vertebrate fauna species and population densities when compared to most other
sites on the Mornington Peninsula.
6.
The nature of the Tootgarook Wetland is an ephemeral wetland and as such it
supports a wide range of fauna species occupying habitats on a permanent or
seasonal basis.
7.
The results from this study are recommended to inform the development and
implementation of a longitudinal environmental monitoring program that captures
changes to species diversity and abundance in response to variable seasonal
conditions particularly for migratory species.
8.
That some of the existing planning scheme zonings and overlay controls under the
Mornington Peninsula Shire Planning scheme for the seven study sites do not
recognise the presence of and need to protect designated significant biodiversity
values. Investigate changing some overlays to conservation.
9.
Existing reserve asset maintenance practices conducted for council at some study
sites (eg 40 Colchester Road) appear to involve the removal of native vegetation and
212
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
potential associated habitat loss. Other study sites (eg former Trumans Road landfill
site undeveloped proportion and Hiscock Road Reserve) appear to be largely
unmanaged for the protection of biodiversity values present on the council land. At
such sites there is a concern or without regard for the protection of biodiversity
values when biodiversity values are being managed on private properties adjacent
(eg Boneo Park and the Melbourne Water retarding basin).
10. A strong recommendation is made for the extension of existing public land feral
fauna and weed management programs to include the VicRoads Freeway reservation.
11. That the shire seeks to further support Save Tootgarook Swamp Inc. to help increase
community knowledge and monitoring of biodiversity and cultural values of the
wetland.
12. That the shire and Melbourne Water adopt a priority to direct resources to improve
the interpretation of wetland environmental values and their protection to the
different land users of the wetland including occupants of the industrial estate,
commercial area, residential area and schools of the greater wetland catchment.
13. That where applicable, the shire seek to accommodate vegetation offsets on shire
owned land assets in the wetland area, arising from vegetation clearance associated
with approved town planning permits elsewhere.
14. And implement future environmental management priorities and a Tootgarook
Wetland environmental monitoring program.
15. That the shire and Melbourne Water increase the priority to rehabilitate biolinks
along Hiscock Road between Truemans Road and Boneo Road and along Chainman’s
Creek from Browns Road to its mouth. Adopt and revegetate in cleared areas the
biolink along Hiscock Road and Drum Drum Alloc Creek which will eventually link
Tootgarook Wetlands with Arthur’s Seat State Park. The main breaks which need
revegetating within the Drum Drum Alloc Creek biolink are between Boneo Road and
Jetty Road.
16. Recommendations for fauna species contained in Action Plans and Recovery Plans
under the EPBC Act 1999 and the FFG Act 1988 be sought to be implemented across
public and private land of the Tootgarook Wetlands.
17. Recommendations for Mornington Peninsula Burrowing Crayfish:x
too be identified and keyed out to species level by the Victorian Museum.
x
that future Tootgarook Wetland environmental monitoring programs include
surveys for the presence/absence of Burrowing Crayfish as an indicator of
the environmental health of the water table.
18. Wetland interpretational signage should include:
213
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
x
An interpretational centre needs to be constructed within Elizabeth Avenue
(possible 92 Elizabeth Avenue) depicting interpretive signage and a look-out
tower. Such signage should depict the entire Tootgarook Wetland and its
biodiversity values Interpretive signage could also be erected at prominent
visible sites including in the vicinity of Chainman’s Creek along Point Nepean
Road.
x
Council and Melbourne Water as the managers of the seven study sites
should
develop
and
install
signage
at
each
site
interpreting
the
environmental, cultural and hydro-geological functions of the land parcel at a
prominent location within each site.
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Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
5.0 REFERENCES
Allen, G. R., Midgley, S. H. & Allen, M. (2002). Field Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of Australia.
Published by the Western Australian Museum, Francis Street Perth, 6000.
Cogger, H.G. (2000). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia (Sixth Edition). New Holland Publishers Pty
Ltd, Sydney, N.S.W.
Hawkins, H. J., & Smith, F. J. (1997). Identification Guide No. 8 Colour guide to Invertebrates of
Australian Inland waters. Co-operative Research Centre for Freshwater Ecology, Albury New South
Wales.
Hero. J., Littlejohn, M., & Marantelli, M. (1991). Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Dept. Of
Conservation and Environment, Melbourne.
Jenkins, R. And Bartell, R. (1980). A Field Guide to Reptiles of the Australian High Country. Inkata
Press Pty Ltd, Melbourne.
Legg, M. (2003). Fauna survey and management prescriptions for Tootgarook Wetlands and Tern
Avenue Reserve, Rosebud West, November 2003.
Legg, M. (2003). Fauna survey and management prescriptions for Tootgarook Swamp, Boneo,
November 2003.
Legg, M. (2006). Fauna survey and management prescriptions for Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve,
Rosebud West, June 2005 to January 2006.
Legg, M. (2006). White-footed Dunnart survey of Tootgarook Swamp Reserve, Boneo and Sanctuary
Park Bushland Reserve, Rosebud West, September 2006.
Menkhorst, W. (1996). Mammals of Victoria. Oxford University Press. Victoria, 1996.
NRE 2000a. Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria-2007. Department of Natural Resources and
Environment, Victoria.
Port Phillip and Westernport Catchment and Land Protection Board. Draft Port Phillip and
Westernport Native vegetation Plan. August, 2000.
Simpson, K. And Day, N. (1999). Field Guide to the Birds of Australia… (Sixth Edition). Penguin Books
Australia.
Strahan, R. (1998). The Mammals of Australia (Revised Edition). New Holland Publishers Pty Ltd,
Sydney.
Yugovic, J. Oct. 2002. Mornington Peninsula Ecological Vegetation Class Profiles. Biosis Research.
215
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Appendix 1- Fauna Species Detected During this Survey within
the south-west corner of 3 Dutton Street.
Fauna taxa detected throughout study site during the survey by Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services. All fauna
was detected throughout the study site from October 2013 to May 2014.
Codes for status within the study site and Victoria:
*
introduced species
VU
Vulnerable in Victoria (DSE 2013)
EN
Endangered in Victoria (DSE 2013) or Australia (EPBC Act)
NT
Near threatened in Victoria (DSE 2013)
L
listed as threatened under FFG Act 1988
I
Invalid or ineligible under FFG Act 1988
KEY-Significance/status of species:
N
S
R
HL
L
*
National
State
Regional
High Local
Local
Introduced
Type of record:
h
s
I
t
a
v
B
Heard
Seen
Incidental (scats, feathers etc.)
Trapped/handheld
recorded on Anabat 2 Bat Detector
Filmed on Scout-guard Camera
Breeding residential bird
Table 76.
Scientific Name
Decapod crustacean results
Engaeus sps.
Table 77.
Scientific Name
Amphibian results
Crinia signifera
Limnodynastes dumerilli
Limnodynastes tasmaniensis
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Common Name
Conservation status within the
study site.
Type of record
Burrowing Cray sp.
Common in some areas
Ls
Common Name
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Spotted Marsh Frog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Conservation status within
the study site.
Common
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Ssh
Lhs
Lhs
216
of
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 78.
Scientific Name
Reptile results
TORTOISES
Chelodinia longicollis
LIZARDS
Lissolepis coventryi
Lampropholis guichenoti
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
SNAKES
Austrelaps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Table 79.
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status
within the study site.
Type of
record
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Rare
Ss
Swamp Skink
Garden Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Rare
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Sts
Lst
Rts
Rts
Sts
Rst
Rstv
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Rare
Rare
HLs
Rst
Coastal and wetland bird results
Common Name
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porphyrio porphyrio
Threskiornis
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicolis
Vanellus miles
Table 80.
Scientific Name
Australian Pelican
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Purple Swamphen
Nankeen Night Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked ibis
Masked Lapwing
Woodland bird results
Coturnix pectoralis
Elanus axillaris
Aquila audax
Circus approximans
Eolophus roseicapillus
Cacatua galerita
Trichoglossus haematodus
Glossopsitta concinna
Chalcites basalis
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Malurus cyaneus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Acanthiza pusilla
Anthochaera carunculata
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Lichenostomus chrysops
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Eopsaltria australis
Colluricincla harmonica
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Grallina cyanoleura
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Corvus coronoides
Common name
Stubble Quail
Black-shouldered Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Horsfield’s Bronze-cuckoo
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Conservation
status
within the study site.
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Uncommon
Conservation
status
within the study site.
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Common at times
Common
Rare
Common
Common
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Common
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Type
record
Lhs
Rhs
Shs
Lhs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Ss
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhsv
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
of
of
217
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scientific Name
Common name
Corvus mellori
Hirundo neoxena
Anthus novaehollandiae
*Alauda arvensis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Cisticola exilis
Megalurus gramineus
*Caeduelis carduelis
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
*Acridotheres tristis
*Denotes introduced species
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Richard’s Pipit
Skylark
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
European Goldfinch
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Table 81.
Scientific Name
Mammal results
MONOTREMES
Tachyglossus aculeatus
MARSUPIALS
Trichosurus vulpecula
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
Wallabia bicolor
PLACENTAL MAMMALS
MICROBATS
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Nyctophilus geoffroyi
Vespadelus vulturnus
RODENTS
Rattus lutreolus ssp. lutreolus
INTRODUCED MAMMALS
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
*Denotes introduced species
Conservation
status
within the study site.
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Lhs
hs
hs
hs
Common Name
Conservation status within
the study site.
Type of
record
Short-beaked Echidna
Rare
RsIv
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Lhsv
Lhs
Rhs
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Little Forest Bat
Common
Common
Rare
Common
Rha
Ra
Swamp Rat
Common
RtIv
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
sv
tv
sIv
t
of
Ra
218
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Appendix 2- Fauna Species Detected During this Survey
at the Rosebud West Industrial Estate Retarding Basin.
Fauna taxa detected throughout study site during the survey by Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services. All fauna
was detected throughout the study site from October 2013 to May 2014.
Codes for status within the reserve and Victoria:
*
introduced species
VU
Vulnerable in Victoria (DSE 2013)
EN
Endangered in Victoria (DSE 2013) or Australia (EPBC Act)
NT
Near threatened in Victoria (DSE 2013)
L
listed as threatened under FFG Act 1988
I
Invalid or ineligible under FFG Act 1988
KEY-Significance/status of species:
N
S
R
HL
L
*
National
State
Regional
High Local
Local
Introduced
Type of record:
h
s
I
t
a
v
B
Heard
Seen
Incidental (scats, feathers etc.)
Trapped/handheld
recorded on Anabat 2 Bat Detector
Filmed on Scout-guard Camera
Breeding residential bird
Table 82.
Scientific Name
Decapod crustacean results
Common Name
Conservation status within the
reserve.
Type of record
Burrowing Cray sp.
Common in wet areas
Ls
Common Name
Conservation status within the
reserve.
Type of record
Anguilla australis
Short-finned Eel
Rare
Lt
*Tinca tinca
Tench
Rare
Lt
*Gambusia affins
Mosquitofish
Abundant
t
Engaeus sps.
Table 83.
Scientific Name
Table 84.
Scientific Name
Fish results
Amphibian results
Crinia signifera
Limnodynastes dumerilli
Limnodynastes tasmaniensis
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Common Name
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Spotted Marsh Frog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Common
Common
Common
Rare
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Ssh
Lhs
Lhs
219
of
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 85.
Scientific Name
Reptile results
TORTOISES
Chelodinia longicollis
LIZARDS
Lissolepis coventryi
Lampropholis delicata
Lampropholis guichenoti
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
SNAKES
Austrelaps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Notechis scutatus
Table 86.
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status
within the reserve.
Type of
record
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Rare
Ss
Swamp Skink
Delicate Skink
Garden Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Rare
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Sts
Rst
Lst
Rts
Sts
Rst
Rstv
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Mainland Tiger Snake
Rare
Rare
Rare
HLs
Rst
Ls
Coastal and wetland bird results
Common Name
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Phalacrocorax varius
Phalacrocorax melanoleucos
Phalacrocorax carbo
Tachybaptus novaehollandiae
Anas superciliosa
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Porphyrio porphyrio
Fulica atra
Ardea novaehollandiae
Ardea alba
Nycticorax caledonicus
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicollis
Platalea regia
Vanellus miles
Table 87.
Scientific Name
Australian Pelican
Pied Cormorant
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Australasian Grebe
Pacific Black Duck
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Purple Swamphen
Eurasian Coot
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Masked Lapwing
Woodland bird results
Coturnix pectoralis
Aquila audax
Circus approximans
Trichoglossus haematodus
Eolophus roseicapillus
Cacatua galerita
Glossopsitta concinna
Platycercus eximius
Chalcites basalis
Tyto alba
Podargus strigoides
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Dacelo novaeguineae
Malurus cyaneus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Common name
Stubble Quail
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Rainbow Lorikeet
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze-cuckoo
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Rare
Common at times
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Rare
Common
Uncommon
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Shs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Lhs
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Shs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
of
of
220
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scientific Name
Common name
Acanthiza pusilla
Anthochaera carunculata
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Lichenostomus chrysops
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Eopsaltria australis
Colluricincla harmonica
Pachycephala pectoralis
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Grallina cyanoleura
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Corvus coronoides
Corvus mellori
Hirundo neoxena
*Alauda arvensis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Cisticola exilis
Megalurus gramineus
*Caeduelis carduelis
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
*Acridotheres tristis
*Denotes introduced species
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Skylark
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
European Goldfinch
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Table 88.
Scientific Name
Mammal results
MONOTREMES
Tachyglossus aculeatus
MARSUPIALS
Trichosurus vulpecula
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
Wallabia bicolor
PLACENTAL MAMMALS
MICROBATS
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Nyctophilus geoffroyi
Vespadelus darlingtoni
Vespadelus vulturnus
RODENTS
Rattus lutreolus ssp. lutreolus
INTRODUCED MAMMALS
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
*Denotes introduced species
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Common
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Uncommon
Common at times
Common at times
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Common at times
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhsv
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Lhs
hs
hs
hs
Common Name
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Type of
record
Short-beaked Echidna
Rare
RsIv
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Lhsv
Lhs
Rhs
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Large Forest Bat
Little Forest Bat
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
Common
Rha
Ra
Ra
Ra
Ra
Swamp Rat
Common
RtIv
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
sv
tv
sIv
t
of
221
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Appendix 3- Fauna Species Detected During this Survey
along Hiscock Road Reserve.
Fauna taxa detected throughout study site during the survey by Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services. All fauna
was detected throughout the study site from October 2013 to May 2014.
Codes for status within the road reserve and Victoria:
*
introduced species
VU
Vulnerable in Victoria (DSE 2013)
EN
Endangered in Victoria (DSE 2013) or Australia (EPBC Act)
NT
Near threatened in Victoria (DSE 2013)
L
listed as threatened under FFG Act 1988
I
Invalid or ineligible under FFG Act 1988
KEY-Significance/status of species:
N
S
R
HL
L
*
National
State
Regional
High Local
Local
Introduced
Type of record:
h
s
I
t
a
v
B
Heard
Seen
Incidental (scats, feathers etc.)
Trapped/handheld
recorded on Anabat 2 Bat Detector
Filmed on Scout-guard Camera
Breeding residential bird
Table 89.
Scientific Name
Decapod crustacean results
Common Name
Conservation status along the
road reserve.
Type of record
Burrowing Cray sp.
Common in wet areas
Ls
Common Name
Conservation status along the
road reserve.
Type of record
Anguilla australis
Short-finned Eel
Common
Ls
Galaxias maculatus
Common Galaxias
Common
Lt
Galaxias truttaceus
Spotted Galaxias
Rare
Rt
*Gambusia affins
Mosquitofish
Abundant
t
Engaeus sps.
Table 90.
Scientific Name
Table 91.
Scientific Name
Fish results
Amphibian results
Crinia signifera
Paracrinia haswelli
Limnodynastes dumerilli
Limnodynastes tasmaniensis
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Common Name
Common Froglet
Haswell’s Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Spotted Marsh Frog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Conservation status along
the road reserve.
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Ssh
Lhs
Lhs
222
of
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 92.
Scientific Name
Reptile results
TORTOISES
Chelodinia longicollis
LIZARDS
Bassiana duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lampropholis guichenoti
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Tiliqua scincoides
SNAKES
Austrelaps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Notechis scutatus
Table 93.
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status along
the road reserve.
Type of
record
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Uncommon
Ss
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Garden Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Common Blue-tongue
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rs
Rst
Lst
Sts
Rts
Rts
Sts
Rst
Rstv
Lts
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Tiger Snake
Rare
Rare
Rare
HLs
Rst
Ls
Coastal and wetland bird results
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Phalacrocorax varius
Phalacrocorax melanoleucos
Phalacrocorax carbo
Cygnus atratus
Anas superciliosa
Anas castanea
Anas rhynchotis
Stictonetta naevosa
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Porzana tabuensis
Gallinuta tenebrosa
Porphyrio porphyrio
Ardea pacifica
Egretta novaehollandiae
Ardea alba
Egretta garzetta
Nycticorax caledonicus
Botaurus poiciloptilus
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicollis
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Calidris acuminate
Vanellus miles
Elseyornis melanops
Himantopus himantopus
Larus pacificus
Chlidonias hybridus
Common Name
Australian Pelican
Pied Cormorant
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Chestnut Teal
Australasian Shoveler
Freckled Duck
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Dusky Moorhen
Purple Swamphen
White-necked Heron
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Masked Lapwing
Black-fronted Dotterel
Black-winged Stilt
Pacific Gull
Whiskered Tern
Conservation status along
the road reserve.
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Co0mmon at times
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Type
record
Lhs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Rhs
Shs
Shs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Shs
Nhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Rhs
Lhs
Rhs
Rhs
Shs
Shs
of
223
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 94.
Scientific Name
Woodland bird results
Coturnix pectoralis
Elanus axillaris
Haliastur sphenurus
Haliaeetus leucogaster
Aquila audax
Circus assimilis
Circus approximans
Accipiter fasciatus
Accipter cirrhocephalus
Falco berigora
*Streptopelia chinensis
Eolophus roseicapillus
Cacatua galerita
Trichoglossus haematodus
Glossopsitta concinna
Alisterus scapularis
Platycercus eximius
Chalcites basalis
Chalcites lucidus
Ninox novaeseelandiae
Tyto alba
Dacelo novaeguineae
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Malurus cyaneus
Stipiturus malachurus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Acanthiza pusilla
Acanthiza chrysorrhoa
Anthochaera carunculata
Anthochaera lunulata
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Manorina melanocephala
Lichenostomus chrysops
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris
Eopsaltria australis
Petrocia rodinogaster
Colluricincla harmonica
Pachycephala pectoralis
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Grallina cyanoleura
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Corvus coronoides
Corvus mellori
Hirundo neoxena
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Cisticola exilis
Megalurus gramineus
*Caeduelis carduelis
Neochmia temporalis
Dicaeum hirundinaceum
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
Common name
Stubble Quail
Black-shouldered Kite
Whistling Kite
White-bellied Sea-Eagle
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Brown Goshawk
Collared Sparrowhawk
Brown Falcon
Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Australian King Parrot
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze-cuckoo
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Eastern Yellow Robin
Pink Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Conservation status along
the road reserve.
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Common
Rare
Common
Common
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Common
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Common at times
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Common at times
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common at times
Rare
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
HLhs
Shs
HLhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Hs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Rhs
HLhs
SLs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Rhs
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
hs
hs
of
224
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
*Acridotheres tristis
Table 95.
Scientific Name
Mammal results
MONOTREMES
Tachyglossus aculeatus
MARSUPIALS
Trichosurus vulpecula
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
Wallabia bicolor
PLACENTAL MAMMALS
MICROBATS
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Nyctophilus geoffroyi
Vespadelus darlingtoni
Vespadelus vulturnus
RODENTS
Rattus lutreolus ssp. lutreolus
INTRODUCED MAMMALS
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
Dama dama
*Denotes introduced species
Common Myna
Common
hs
Common Name
Conservation status along
the road reserve.
Type of
record
Short-beaked Echidna
Rare
RsIv
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Lhsv
Lhs
Rhs
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Large Forest Bat
Little Forest Bat
Common
Common
Rare
Uncommon
Common
Rha
Ra
Swamp Rat
Common
RtIv
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Fallow Deer
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
sv
tv
sIv
t
Ra
Ra
225
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Appendix 4- Fauna Species Detected During this Survey
at 40 Colchester Road Reserve.
Fauna taxa detected throughout study site during the survey by Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services. All fauna
was detected throughout the study site from October 2013 to May 2014.
Codes for status within the reserve and Victoria:
*
introduced species
VU
Vulnerable in Victoria (DSE 2013)
EN
Endangered in Victoria (DSE 2013) or Australia (EPBC Act)
NT
Near threatened in Victoria (DSE 2013)
L
listed as threatened under FFG Act 1988
I
Invalid or ineligible under FFG Act 1988
KEY-Significance/status of species:
N
S
R
HL
L
*
National
State
Regional
High Local
Local
Introduced
Type of record:
h
s
I
t
a
v
B
Heard
Seen
Incidental (scats, feathers etc.)
Trapped/handheld
recorded on Anabat 2 Bat Detector
Filmed on Scout-guard Camera
Breeding residential bird
Table 96.
Scientific Name
Decapod crustacean results
Engaeus sps.
Table 97.
Scientific Name
Amphibian results
Crinia signifera
Limnodynastes dumerilli
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Common Name
Conservation status within the
reserve.
Type of record
Burrowing Cray sp.
Common in wet areas
Ls
Common Name
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Common
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Ssh
Lhs
Lhs
226
of
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 98.
Scientific Name
Reptile results
Common Name
Conservation status
within the reserve.
Type of
record
LIZARDS
Bassiana duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lampropholis guichenoti
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
SNAKES
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Garden Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rs
Rst
Lst
Sts
Rts
Sts
Rst
Rstv
Austrelaps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Rare
Rare
HLs
Rst
Table 99.
Scientific Name
Coastal and wetland bird results
Common Name
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Porzana tabuensis
Porphyrio porphyrio
Ardea novaehollandiae
Nycticorax caledonicus
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicollis
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Vanellus miles
Australian Pelican
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Purple Swamphen
White-faced Heron
Nankeen Night Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Masked Lapwing
Table 100. Woodland bird results
Scientific Name
Common name
Coturnix pectoralis
Elanus axillaris
Aquila audax
Accipiter fasciatus
Circus approximans
Eolophus roseicapillus
Cacatua galerita
Trichoglossus haematodus
Glossopsitta concinna
Platycercus eximius
Chalcites basalis
Tyto alba
Podargus strigoides
Dacelo novaeguineae
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Malurus cyaneus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Acanthiza pusilla
Anthochaera carunculata
Anthochaera lunulata
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Lichenostomus chrysops
Stubble Quail
Black-shouldered Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Brown Goshawk
Swamp Harrier
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze-cuckoo
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Common
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Type
record
Lhs
Rhs
Shs
Shs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Lhs
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
of
of
Lhs
Lhs
Ss
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
227
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scientific Name
Common name
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris
Petrocia rodinogaster
Eopsaltria australis
Colluricincla harmonica
Pachycephala pectoralis
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Grallina cyanoleura
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Corvus coronoides
Corvus mellori
Hirundo neoxena
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Cisticola exilis
Megalurus gramineus
*Caeduelis carduelis
Neochmia temporalis
Dicaeum hirundinaceum
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
*Acridotheres tristis
*Denotes introduced species
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Pink Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Table 101. Mammal results
Scientific Name
MONOTREMES
Tachyglossus aculeatus
MARSUPIALS
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
Wallabia bicolor
PLACENTAL MAMMALS
MICROBATS
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Nyctophilus geoffroyi
Vespadelus vulturnus
RODENTS
Rattus lutreolus ssp. lutreolus
INTRODUCED MAMMALS
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
*Denotes introduced species
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Common
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Rh
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
hs
hs
hs
Common Name
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Type of
record
Short-beaked Echidna
Rare
RsIv
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Uncommon
Rare
Lhs
Rhs
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Little Forest Bat
Common
Common
Rare
Common
Rha
Ra
Ra
Ra
Swamp Rat
Uncommon
RtIv
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
sv
tv
sIv
t
of
228
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Appendix 5- Fauna Species Detected During this Survey
at Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
Fauna taxa detected throughout study site during the survey by Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services. All fauna
was detected throughout the study site from October 2013 to May 2014.
Codes for status within the reserve and Victoria:
*
introduced species
VU
Vulnerable in Victoria (DSE 2013)
EN
Endangered in Victoria (DSE 2013) or Australia (EPBC Act)
NT
Near threatened in Victoria (DSE 2013)
L
listed as threatened under FFG Act 1988
I
Invalid or ineligible under FFG Act 1988
KEY-Significance/status of species:
N
S
R
HL
L
*
National
State
Regional
High Local
Local
Introduced
Type of record:
h
s
I
t
a
v
B
Heard
Seen
Incidental (scats, feathers etc.)
Trapped/handheld
recorded on Anabat 2 Bat Detector
Filmed on Scout-guard Camera
Breeding residential bird
Table 102. Decapod crustacean results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status within the
reserve.
Type of record
Engaeus sps.
Burrowing Cray sp.
Common in wet areas
Ls
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status within the
reserve.
Type of record
Anguilla australis
Short-finned Eel
Rare
Ls
Galaxias maculatus
Common Galaxias
Common
Lt
Galaxias truttaceus
Spotted Galaxias
Rare
Rt
Pseudaphritis urvillii
Tupong
Rare
Lt
*Gambusia affins
Mosquitofish
Common
t
Table 103. Fish results
Table 104. Amphibian results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Crinia signifera
Paracrinia haswelli
Limnodynastes dumerilli
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Common Froglet
Haswell’s Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Common
Uncommon
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lt
Lhs
Ssh
Lhs
Lhs
229
of
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 105. Reptile results
Scientific Name
TORTOISES
Chelodinia longicollis
LIZARDS
Bassiana duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lampropholis guichenoti
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Tiliqua scincoides
SNAKES
Austrelaps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Notechis scutatus
Common Name
Conservation status
within the reserve.
Type of
record
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Rare
Ss
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Garden Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Common Blue-tongue
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Rs
Rst
Lst
Sts
Rts
Rts
Sts
Rst
Rstv
Lts
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Tiger Snake
Rare
Rare
Rare
HLs
Rst
Ls
Table 106. Coastal and wetland bird results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Phalacrocorax varius
Phalacrocorax melanoleucos
Cygnus atratus
Phalacrocorax carbo
Anus castanea
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Porzana tabuensis
Gallinuta tenebrosa
Porphyrio porphyrio
Ardea novaehollandiae
Ardea alba
Nycticorax caledonicus
Botaurus poiciloptilus
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicollis
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Vanellus miles
Larus novaehollandiae
Larus pacificus
Australian Pelican
Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Chestnut Teal
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Dusky Moorhen
Purple Swamphen
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Masked Lapwing
Silver Gull
Pacific Gull
Table 107. Woodland bird results
Scientific Name
Common name
Coturnix pectoralis
Elanus axillaris
Haliastur sphenurus
Aquila audax
Circus approximans
Accipiter fasciatus
Accipter cirrhocephalus
Falco peregrinus
Stubble Quail
Black-shouldered Kite
Whistling Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Swamp Harrier
Brown Goshawk
Collared Sparrrowhawk
Peregrine Falcon
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Common at Times
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Type
record
Lhs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Shs
Shs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Nhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
HLhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
of
of
230
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scientific Name
Common name
Falco cenchroides
*Streptopelia chinensis
Eolophus roseicapillus
Cacatua galerita
Trichoglossus haematodus
Glossopsitta concinna
Platycercus eximius
Chalcites basalis
Chalcites lucidus
Ninox novaeseelandiae
Tyto alba
Podargus strigoides
Dacelo novaeguineae
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Malurus cyaneus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Acanthiza pusilla
Acanthiza nana
Anthochaera carunculata
Anthochaera lunulata
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Lichenostomus chrysops
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris
Petroica rodinogaster
Petroica phoenicea
Eopsaltria australis
Colluricincla harmonica
Pachycephala pectoralis
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Grallina cyanoleura
Coracina novaehollandiae
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Corvus coronoides
Corvus mellori
Hirundo neoxena
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Cisticola exilis
Megalurus gramineus
*Caeduelis carduelis
Neochmia temporalis
Dicaeum hirundinaceum
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
*Acridotheres tristis
*Denotes introduced species
Nankeen Kestrel
Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Horsfield’s Bronze-cuckoo
Shining Bronze-Cuckoo
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Pink Robin
Flame Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Common at times
Common at times
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Common at times
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common at times
Common
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common at times
Rare
Common
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Hs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Ss
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Rhs
Rhs
Rhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
hs
hs
hs
of
231
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 108. Mammal results
Scientific Name
MONOTREMES
Tachyglossus aculeatus
MARSUPIALS
Sminthopsis leucopus
Trichosurus vulpecula
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
Wallabia bicolor
PLACENTAL MAMMALS
MICROBATS
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Nyctophilus geoffroyi
Vespadelus darlingtoni
Vespadelus vulturnus
RODENTS
Rattus lutreolus ssp. lutreolus
INTRODUCED MAMMALS
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
*Denotes introduced species
Common Name
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Type of
record
Short-beaked Echidna
Uncommon
RsIv
White-footed Dunnart
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Ss
Lhsv
Lhs
Rhs
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Large Forest Bat
Little Forest Bat
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
Common
Rha
Ra
Ra
Ra
Ra
Swamp Rat
Common
RtIv
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
sv
tv
sIv
t
232
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Appendix 6- Fauna Species Detected During this Survey along the
eastern edges of the Truemans Road Landfill site.
Fauna taxa detected throughout study site during the survey by Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services. All fauna
was detected throughout the study site from October 2013 to May 2014.
Codes for status within the study site and Victoria:
*
introduced species
VU
Vulnerable in Victoria (DSE 2013)
EN
Endangered in Victoria (DSE 2013) or Australia (EPBC Act)
NT
Near threatened in Victoria (DSE 2013)
L
listed as threatened under FFG Act 1988
I
Invalid or ineligible under FFG Act 1988
KEY-Significance/status of species:
N
S
R
HL
L
*
National
State
Regional
High Local
Local
Introduced
Type of record:
h
s
I
t
a
v
B
Heard
Seen
Incidental (scats, feathers etc.)
Trapped/handheld
recorded on Anabat 2 Bat Detector
Filmed on Scout-guard Camera
Breeding residential bird
Table 109. Decapod crustacean results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status within the
study site.
Type of record
Engaeus sps.
Burrowing Cray sp.
Common in wet areas
Ls
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status within the
study site.
Type of record
Anguilla australis
Short-finned Eel
Rare
Lts
Galaxias maculatus
Common Galaxias
Rare
Lts
* Gambusia affins
Mosquitofish
Common
t
Table 110. Fish results
Table 111. Amphibian results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Crinia signifera
Paracrinia haswelli
Limnodynastes dumerilli
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Common Froglet
Haswell’s Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Conservation status within
the study site.
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Ssh
Lhs
Lhs
233
of
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 112. Reptile results
Scientific Name
TORTOISES
Chelodinia longicollis
LIZARDS
Bassiana duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lampropholis guichenoti
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Saproscincus mustellinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Tiliqua scincoides
SNAKES
Austrelaps superbus
Notechis scutatus
Common Name
Conservation status
within the study site.
Type of
record
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Rare
Ss
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Garden Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Common Blue-tongue
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rs
Rst
Lst
Sts
Rts
Rst
Rstv
Lts
Lowland Copperhead
Tiger Snake
Rare
Rare
HLs
Rst
Table 113. Coastal and wetland bird results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Cygnus atratus
Anas superciliosa
Anas castanea
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana tabuensis
Porphyrio porphyrio
Ardea pacifica
Ardea novaehollandiae
Ardea alba
Egretta garzetta
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicolis
Platalea regia
Gallinago hardwickii
Vanellus miles
Himantopus himantopus
Larus pacificus
Chlidonias hybridus
Australian Pelican
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Chestnut Teal
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Spotless Crake
Purple Swamphen
White-necked Heron
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Little Egret
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Masked Lapwing
Black-winger Stilt
Pacific Gull
Whiskered Tern
Table 114. Woodland bird results
Scientific Name
Common name
Elanus axillaris
Aquila audax
Circus assimilis
Circus approximans
*Streptopelia chinensis
Eolophus roseicapillus
Trichoglossus haematodus
Glossopsitta concinna
Chalcites lucidus
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Malurus cyaneus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Acanthiza pusilla
Black-shouldered Kite
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Shining Bronze-cuckoo
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Conservation
status
within the study site.
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Common
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Conservation
status
within the study site.
Rare
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common
Uncommon
Common at times
Common at times
Rare
Common at times
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Shs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Lhs
Lhs
Shs
Shs
Lhs
Rhs
Shs
Shs
Type
record
Lhs
HLhs
Shs
HLhs
Hs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Ss
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
of
of
234
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scientific Name
Common name
Acanthiza chrysorrhoa
Anthochaera carunculata
Anthochaera lunulata
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Lichenostomus penicillatus
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Petroica phoenicea
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Grallina cyanoleura
Coracina novaehollandiae
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Corvus coronoides
Corvus mellori
Hirundo neoxena
*Alauda arvensis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Cisticola exilis
Megalurus gramineus
*Caeduelis carduelis
Neochmia temporalis
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
*Acridotheres tristis
*Denotes introduced species
Yellow Rumped Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Flame Robin
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Skylark
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Table 115. Mammal results
Scientific Name
MONOTREMES
Tachyglossus aculeatus
MARSUPIALS
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
Wallabia bicolor
PLACENTAL MAMMALS
MICROBATS
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Vespadelus vulturnus
RODENTS
Rattus lutreolus ssp. lutreolus
INTRODUCED MAMMALS
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
*Denotes introduced species
Conservation
status
within the study site.
Common at times
Rare
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Common at times
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Common
Common
Common at times
Common
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhsv
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
hs
hs
Common Name
Conservation status within
the study site.
Type of
record
Short-beaked Echidna
Rare
RsIv
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
Uncommon
Rare
Lhs
Rhs
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Little Forest Bat
Common
Common
Rare
Rha
Ra
Ra
Swamp Rat
Uncommon
RtIv
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Common
Common
Rare
Rare
sv
tv
hs
hs
of
235
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Appendix 7- Fauna Species Detected During this Survey
along Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve.
Fauna taxa detected throughout study site during the survey by Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Environmental and Ecological Services. All fauna
was detected throughout the study site from October 2013 to May 2014.
Codes for status within the reserve and Victoria:
*
introduced species
VU
Vulnerable in Victoria (DSE 2013)
EN
Endangered in Victoria (DSE 2013) or Australia (EPBC Act)
NT
Near threatened in Victoria (DSE 2013)
L
listed as threatened under FFG Act 1988
I
Invalid or ineligible under FFG Act 1988
KEY-Significance/status of species:
N
S
R
HL
L
*
National
State
Regional
High Local
Local
Introduced
Type of record:
h
s
I
t
a
v
B
Heard
Seen
Incidental (scats, feathers etc.)
Trapped/handheld
recorded on Anabat 2 Bat Detector
Filmed on Scout-guard Camera
Breeding residential bird
Table 116. Decapod crustacean results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status within the
reserve.
Type of record
Engaeus sps.
Burrowing Cray sp.
Common in wet areas
Ls
Table 117. Amphibian results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Crinia signifera
Limnodynastes dumerilli
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Common Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Ssh
Lhs
Lhs
236
of
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Table 118. Reptile results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Conservation status
within the reserve.
Type of
record
LIZARDS
Bassiana duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lampropholis guichenoti
Lissolepis coventryi
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustellinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Tiliqua scincoides
SNAKES
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Garden Skink
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Common Blue-tongue
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rs
Rst
Lst
Sts
Sts
Rst
Rstv
Lts
Austrelaps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Notechis scutatus
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
Tiger Snake
Rare
Rare
Rare
HLs
Rst
Ls
Table 119. Coastal and wetland bird results
Scientific Name
Common Name
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Anas superciliosa
Gallirallus philippensis
Ardea novaehollandiae
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicolis
Vanellus miles
Larus novaehollandiae
Australian Pelican
Pacific Black Duck
Buff-banded Rail
White-faced Heron
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked ibis
Masked Lapwing
Silver Gull
Table 120. Woodland bird results
Scientific Name
Common name
Circus approximans
*Streptopelia chinensis
Eolophus roseicapillus
Cacatua galerita
Trichoglossus haematodus
Glossopsitta concinna
Platycercus eximius
Chalcites lucidus
Podargus strigoides
Dacelo novaeguineae
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Malurus cyaneus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Acanthiza pusilla
Anthochaera carunculata
Anthochaera lunulata
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Manorina melanocephala
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris
Pachycephala pectoralis
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Grallina cyanoleura
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Swamp Harrier
Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Eastern Rosella
Shining Bronze-cuckoo
Tawny Frogmouth
Laughing Kookaburra
White-throated Needletail
Superb Fairy-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Golden Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Rare
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Rare
Common
Common
Uncommon
Common
Common at times
Uncommon
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Common
Common at times
Common
Common
Common
Common
Uncommon
Common
Uncommon
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Rare
Uncommon
Uncommon
Uncommon
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Type
record
HLhs
hs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
HLhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Ss
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhsv
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
of
of
237
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scientific Name
Common name
Corvus coronoides
Corvus mellori
Hirundo neoxena
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Neochmia temporalis
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
*Acridotheres tristis
*Denotes introduced species
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Welcome Swallow
Clamorous Reed-Warbler
Red-browed Finch
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Table 121. Mammal results
Scientific Name
MARSUPIALS
Trichosurus vulpecula
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
PLACENTAL MAMMALS
MICROBATS
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Vespadelus vulturnus
RODENTS
Rattus lutreolus ssp. lutreolus
INTRODUCED MAMMALS
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
*Denotes introduced species
Conservation
status
within the reserve.
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Rare
Rare
Common at times
Common
Common
Common
Type
record
Lhs
Lhs
Lhs
Rhs
Lhs
Lhs
hs
hs
hs
Common Name
Conservation status within
the reserve.
Type of
record
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Uncommon
Uncommon
Lhsv
Lhs
White-striped Free-tail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Little Forest Bat
Common
Common
Rare
Rha
Ra
Ra
Swamp Rat
Uncommon
RtIv
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Uncommon
Common
Rare
Common
sv
tv
hs
hs
of
238
Fauna survey results for all seven study sites and previous surveys
Engaeus sps.
Anguilla australis
Galaxias maculatus
Galaxias truttaceus
Pseudaphritis urvillii
*Tinca tinca
*Gambusia affins
Crinia signifera
Paracrinia haswelli
Limnodynastes dumerilii insularis
Limnodynastes tasmaniensis
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Litoria ewingii
Litoria verreauxii
Chelodinia longicollis
Bassiana duperreyi
Lampropholis delicata
Lampropholis guichenoti
Lissolepis coventryi
Niveoscincus metallicus
Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Saproscincus mustelinus
Tiliqua nigrolutea
Tiliqua scincoides
Austrelaps superbus
Drysdalia coronoides
Freshwater Crayfish species
Short-finned Eel
Common Galaxias
Spotted Galaxias
Tupong
Tench
Mosquitofish
Common Froglet
Haswell’s Froglet
Southern Bullfrog
Spotted Marsh Frog
Southern Toadlet
Southern Brown Tree Frog
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Garden Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue Lizard
Common Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
White-lipped Snake
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Table 122: Fauna taxa detected throughout the study sites and during previous surveys. By Malcolm Legg of Mal’s Eco. & Enviro. Services.
Scientific Name
Common Name
TW &
SPBR
3DS
RBRIE
HRR
40CRR
SPBR
TABR
2005-06
2003
Appendix 8
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
239
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TRLF
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TABR
Common Name
Mainland Tiger Snake
Stubble Quail
Australian Pelican
Pied Cormorant
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Australasian Grebe
Black Swan
Pacific Black Duck
Chestnut Teal
Australasian Shoveler
Freckled Duck
Australian Wood Duck
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Ballion’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Purple Swamphen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
White-necked Heron
White-faced Heron
Great Egret
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill
Lathams Snipe
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Scientific Name
Notechis scutatus
Coturnix pectoralis
Pelecanus conspicillatus
Phalacrocorax varius
Phalacrocorax melanoleucos
Phalacrocorax carbo
Tachybaptus novaehollandiae
Cygnus atratus
Anas superciliosa
Anas castanea
Anas rhynchotis
Stictonetta naevosa
Chenonetta jubata
Gallirallus philippensis
Rallus pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Porzana tabuensis
Porphyrio porphyrio
Gallinula tenebrosa
Fulica atra
Ardea pacifica
Egretta novaehollandiae
Ardea alba
Egretta garzetta
Nycticorax caledonicus
Botaurus poiciloptilus
Threskiornis molucca
Threskiornis spinicollis
Platalea regia
Platalea flavipes
Gallinago hardwickii
Calidris acuminate
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SPBR
2005-06
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TW &
TABR
2003
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
3DS
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
HRR
X
X
X
RBRIE
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
40CRR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SPBR
240
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TRLF
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TABR
Common Name
Masked Lapwing
Black-fronted Dotterel
Black-winged Stilt
Pacific Gull
Silver Gull
Whiskered Tern
Black-shouldered Kit
Whistling Kite
White-bellied Sea-Eagle
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Brown Goshawk
Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Peregrine Falcon
Australian Hobby
Brown Falcon
Nankeen Kestrel
Spotted Turtle-Dove
Galah
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Australian King Parrot
Crimson Rosella
Eastern Rosella
Fantail Cuckoo
Horsefield’s Bronze Cuckoo
Shining Bronze-Cuckoo
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Scientific Name
Vanellus miles
Elseyornis melanops
Himantopus himantopus
Larus pacificus
Larus novaehollandiae
Chlidonias hybridus
Elanus axillaris
Haliastur sphenurus
Haliaeetus leucogaster
Aquila audax
Accipiter fasciatus
Accipiter cirrhocephalus
Circus assimilis
Circus approximans
Falco peregrinus
Falco longipennis
Falco berigora
Falco cenchroides
*Streptopelia chinensis
Eolophus roseicapillus
Cacatua galerita
Trichoglossus haematodus
Glossopsitta concinna
Alisterus scapularis
Platycercus elegans
Platycercus eximius
Cuculus flabelliformis
Chalcites basalis
Chalcites lucidus
Ninox novaeseelandiae
Tyto alba
Podargus strigoides
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
40CRR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SPBR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
HRR
X
X
X
X
X
RBRIE
X
X
X
X
X
3DS
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SPBR
2005-06
TW &
TABR
2003
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
241
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TRLF
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TABR
Common Name
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Superb Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
Spotted Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Brown Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Pink Robin
Flame Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Grey Shrike Thrush
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Magpie-lark
Grey Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Scientific Name
Hirundapus caudactus race caudactus
Dacelo novaehollandiae
Malurus cyaneus
Stipiturus malachurus
Pardalotus punctatus
Sericornis frontalis
Acanthiza pusilla
Acanthiza nana
Acanthiza chrysorrhoa
Anthochaera carunculata
Anthochaera chrysoptera
Acanthagenys rufogularis
Manorina melanocephala
Lichenostomus chrysops
Lichenostomus penicillatus
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera
Phylidonyris novaehollandiae
Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris
Petrocia rodinogaster
Petroica phoenicea
Eopsaltria australis
Colluricincla harmonica
Pachycephala pectoralis
Pachycephala rufiventris
Rhipidura fuliginosa
Rhipidura leucophrys
Coracina novaehollandiae
Grallina cyanoleura
Cracticus torquatus
Gymnorhina tibicen
Corvus coronoides
Corvus mellori
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
40CRR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
HRR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
RBRIE
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
3DS
X
X
X
X
X
SPBR
2005-06
TW &
TABR
2003
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
X
X
X
X
242
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TRLF
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SPBR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TABR
Common Name
Welcome Swallow
Richard’s Pipit
Skylark
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Golden-headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
European Goldfinch
Red-browed Finch
Mistletoebird
Silvereye
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Short-beaked Echidna
White-footed Dunnart
Common Brushtail Possum
Common Ringtail Possum
Black Wallaby
White-striped Freetail Bat
Gould’s Wattled Bat
Lesser Long-eared Bat
Large Forest Bat
Little Forest Bat
Swamp Rat
House Mouse
Black Rat
Red Fox
Feral Cat
Fallow Deer
Scientific Name
Hirundo neoxena
Anthus novaehollandiae
*Alauda arvensis
Acrocephalus stentoreus
Cisticola exilis
Megalurus gramineus
*Caeduelis carduelis
Neochmia temporalis
Dicaeum hirundinaceum
Zosterops lateralis
*Turdus merula
*Sturnus vulgaris
*Acridotheres tristis
Tachyglossus aculeatus
Sminthopsis leucopus
Trichosurus vulpecula
Pseudocheirus peregrinus
Wallabia bicolor
Tadarida australis
Chalinolobus gouldii
Nyctophilus geoffroyi
Vespadelus darlingtoni
Vespadelus vulturnus
Rattus lutreolus ssp. Lutreolus
*Mus musculus
*Rattus rattus
*Vulpes vulpes
*Felis catus
*Dama dama
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
3DS
X
SPBR
2005-06
TW &
TABR
2003
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
RBRIE
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
40CRR
X
X
X
X
X
X
HRR
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SPBR
243
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TRLF
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TABR
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
KEY TO TABLE 122
TW& TABR 2003= Tootgarook Wetlands & Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve, 2003 fauna survey
SPBR 2005-06= Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve, 2005-06 fauna survey
3DS= 3 Dutton Street
RBRIE= Retarding Basin Rosebud Industrial Estate
HRR= Hiscock Road Reserve
40CRR= 40 Colchester Road Reserve
SPBR=Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve
TRLF=Truemans Road land Fill Site (eastern edge)
TABR=Tern Avenue Bushland Reserve
244
Scientific Name
Thinornis rubricollis
Botaurus poiciloptilus
Lathamus discolor
Pachycephala rufogularis
Common Name
Hooded Plover
Australasian Bittern
# Swift Parrot
Red-lored Whistler
records
documented
NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE
1989
3
2014
8
1988
5
2004
1
record
Total # of
Last
Table 123: Significant fauna within 10 kilometers of the study area
EN
EN
VU
EPBC Act
VU
EN
EN
EN
DSE (2013)
Use of the study area:
1
Known resident
2
Possible resident
3
Frequent visitor
4
Occasional visitor
5
Rare visitor
6
Vagrant visitor
7
Unlikely/no suitable habitat
Environment Protection and biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Commonwealth)
Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria (DSE 2013)
Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Victoria)
Species status:
EX
Extinct
RX
Regionally extinct
CR
Critically endangered
EN
Endangered
VU
Vulnerable
RA
Rare
NT
Near threatened
CD
Conservation dependent
LR
Lower risk (least concern)
DD
Data deficient (insufficiently or poorly known)
L
Listed as threatened under FFG Act
I
Invalid or ineligible for listing under the FFG Act
N
Nominated for listing under the FFG Act
#
Protected Matters Search Tool (DEWHA)
EPBC
DSE
FFG
Sources used to determine species status:
.
Matters Search Tool (2010)
L
L
L
L
FFG ACT
VU
EN
EN
NT
Action Plan
National
7
1
5
7
245
Likely use of study area
APPENDIX 9: Threatened DSE Atlas of Victorian Wildlife (AVW 2013) EPBC Protected
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scientific Name
Isoodon obesulus obesulus
Rostratula australis
Prototroctes maraena
Galaxiella pusilla
Synemon plana
Pteropus poliocephalus
Litoria raniformis
Potorous tridactylus
Neophema chrysogaster
Anthochaera phrygia
Dasyurus maculatus
Geopelia cuneata
Lewinia pectoralis
Porzana pusilla
Pelagodroma marina
Hydroprogne caspia
Sternula albifrons
Sternula nereis
Platalea regia
Egretta garzetta
Ardea modesta
Anas rhynchotis
Stictonetta naevosa
Aythya australis
Oxyura australis
Biziura lobata
Accipiter novaehollandiae
Haliaeetus leucogaster
Ninox connivens
Ninox strenua
Pomatostomus temporalis
Sminthopsis leucopus
Varanus varius
Common Name
# Southern Brown Bandicoot
# Australian Painted Snipe
# Australian Grayling
# Dwarf Galaxias
# Golden Sun Moth
# Grey-headed Flying-fox
# Growling Grass Frog
# Long-nosed Potoroo
# Orange-bellied Parrot
# Regent Honeyeater
# Spot-tailed Quoll
Diamond Dove
Lewin’s Rail
Baillon’s Crake
White-faced Storm-Petrel
Caspian Tern
Little Tern
Fairy Tern
Royal Spoonbill
Little Egret
Eastern Great Egret
Australasian Shoveler
Freckled Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Musk Duck
Grey Goshawk
White-bellied Sea-Eagle
Barking Owl
Powerful Owl
Grey-crowned Babbler
White-footed Dunnart
Lace Goanna
records
documented
1987
4
STATE SIGNIFICANCE
1992
1
2014
6
2014
6
1989
2
2001
1
1981
1
1989
1
2014
6
2014
2
2014
6
2001
6
2013
3
2014
5
2003
1
1992
1
2006
5
2014
6
1986
1
2006
16
2000
7
2006
2
1987
1
record
Total # of
Last
-
EN
VU
VU
VU
CR
VU
VU
VU
CR
EN
EN
EPBC Act
NT
VU
VU
VU
NT
VU
EN
NT
EN
VU
VU
EN
VU
EN
VU
VU
VU
EN
VU
EN
NT
EN
NT
CR
VU
EN
EN
VU
EN
LR
CR
CR
EN
DSE (2013)
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
-
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
FFG ACT
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
NT
NT
NT
DD
-
NT
VU
VU
VU
VU
VU
VU
CR
EN
VU
Action Plan
National
6
1
1
7
6
6
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
5
5
6
4
5
1
5
5
7
5
5
6
5
5
6
6
6
6
246
Likely use of study area
Lissolepis coventryi
Pseudemoia rawlinsoni
Pseudophryne semimarmorata
Coturnix ypsilophora
Pelecanoides urinatrix
Thalassarche 247elanophrys
melanophris
Phalacrocorax fuscescens
Phalacrocorax varius
Sterna striata
Larus pacificus pacificus
Haematopus fuliginosus
Numenius madagascariensis
Calidris alba
Gallinago hardwickii
Nycticorax caledonicus
Circus assimilis
Alcedo azurea
Cercartetus nanus
Swamp Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Southern Toadlet
Brown Quail
Common Diving-Petrel
Black-browed Albatross
Black-faced Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
White-fronted Tern
Pacific Gull
Sooty Oystercatcher
Eastern Curlew
Sanderling
Latham’s Snipe
Nankeen Night Heron
Spotted Harrier
Azure Kingfisher
Eastern Pygmy-possum
Scientific Name
Common Name
records
documented
2001
2014
1983
2014
1998
1999
1987
2014
2014
2014
1986
1987
1
16
2
32
25
1
2
29
7
4
1
1
2014
45
2014
16
2014
100+
REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE
2006
7
1989
4
1989
1
record
Total # of
Last
=
-
-
-
EPBC Act
NT
NT
NT
NT
NT
VU
NT
NT
NT
NT
NT
NT
NT
NT
VU
VU
VU
VU
DSE (2013)
N
i
I
L
-
FFG ACT
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
-
-
-
Action Plan
National
7
2
7
6
6
6
6
1
1
4
6
6
4
4
7
1
1
1
247
Likely use of study area
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
APPENDIX 10: Threatened Fauna Management &
Recommendations
Table 124: Significant fauna, their habitat requirements and management actions.
Species
Habitat Requirements
Management Actions
Spotted Galaxias
Has an unusual spawning site where adults wait for
a high water flow in early winter and then
scramble over inundated banks where they lay
their eggs amongst native grasses or sedges or on
small stones and pebbles. When the water subsides, the eggs are exposed and out of water for
days or weeks. To survive the eggs must remain
moist shaded by native streamside trees or
vegetation. Eggs exposed to direct sunlight will
desiccate in seconds and perish. Hatching only
occurs after banks are re-submerged by a
subsequent high flow.
This small froglet lays its eggs within the flooded
habitat and develop into froglets before the site
dries out.
Small amphibian that breeds during autumn and
lays eggs in small burrow that is inundated during
early winter rains.
Aquatic species preferring wetlands, swamps,
dams and creeks.
Terrestrial dwelling species found on sandy soils
where intact understorey occurs.
Keep creek and swamp free from pollutants and
introduced fish.
Haswell’s Froglet
Southern Toadlet
Common Long-necked Tortoise
Eastern Three-lined Skink
Delicate Skink
Swamp Skink
Metallic Skink
Southern Grass Skink
Glossy Grass Skink
Weasel Skink
Blotched Blue-tongue
Lowland Copperhead
Terrestrial dwelling species found amongst fallen
timber and leaf-litter where intact understorey
occurs.
Lives throughout the study sites within a variety of
habitats. They live in the burrows of Burrowing
Crays or crabs. Gives birth to live young. Listed as
Vulnerable in Victoria and is now listed on the
Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act.
Terrestrial and semi arboreal dwelling species
found amongst fallen timber and paperbark trunks,
where intact understorey occurs.
Terrestrial dwelling species found amongst fallen
timber and leaf-litter where intact understorey
occurs.
Confined to the humid microhabitats within
swamps and wetlands, where it occupies the niche
underneath the vegetation. It is diurnal in habit
eating arthropods and is live bearing.
Shade hugging species found amongst fallen
timber and leaf-litter where intact understorey
occurs.
Large terrestrial dwelling skink species found
where intact understoreys occur. Omnivore in
choice of food.
Terrestrial species preferring damp areas or
different water bodies where they hunt frogs and
small lizards for food.
Keep habitat free from changed drainage patterns.
Protect breeding habitat and do not change
natural inundated and drainage areas.
Retain habitat and control feral predators.
Retain and increase terrestrial logs and grassy
understorey. Continue to control habitat changing
weeds and vermin.
Retain and increase terrestrial logs and grassy
understorey. Continue and control habitat
changing weeds and vermin.
Make sure habitat is kept weed free. Eradicate
vermin and retain on ground old-growth logs with
hollows.
Retain and increase terrestrial logs and grassy
understorey. Continue and control habitat
changing weeds and vermin.
Retain and increase terrestrial logs and grassy
understorey. Continue and control habitat
changing weeds and vermin.
Retain and increase terrestrial logs and grassy
understorey. Continue to control habitat changing
weeds and vermin.
Retain and increase habitat logs, leaf-litter and
grassy understorey. Continue to control habitat
changing weeds and vermin.
Retain and increase indigenous understorey and
habitat logs throughout. Continue to control
vermin and habitat changing weeds.
Maintain habitat and control vermin. All snakes are
protected species.
248
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Habitat Requirements
Management Actions
White-lipped Snake
Terrestrial dwelling species found amongst fallen
timber where intact grassy understorey occurs.
Pied Cormorant
Dives and feeds within deepish water bodies
through-out the study sites.
Prefers heavily vegetated swamps where it can
feed and roost in privacy.
One of the rarest water fowl in the world. Prefers
heavily vegetated swamps for breeding and moves
out to salty or brackish areas during droughts.
Lives amongst dense vegetation in swamps,
lagoons, wet grasslands and along water courses.
Food consists of insects, small 249mollusks, and
other invertebrates, seeds and other vegetable
matter. Nests are constructed under a grass
tussock or in thick reeds that are growing in or
near water and is nomadic moving around to find
new habitat when the old habitat has become
dried out or depleted.
Weaves grass and rushes into a nest, sometimes
pulling the surrounding plants down to form a
roof. It is shy and lives in dense vegetation of
swamps, lagoons and creeks and is seldom seen.
They create runways through the vegetation and
can swim on or under water. It feeds on insects
and crustaceans by using its long thin beak to
probe in all sorts of cracks and holes.
Due to its long toes is able to walk on water plants
within the swamps, marshes, lagoons and
waterholes where it lives. It is also an
accomplished swimmer and diver feeding on small
249mollusks, tender pieces of water plants and
seeds. The nest is constructed in tussock or clump
in shallow water of a swamp billabong.
A small secretive wetland bird that inhabits dense
reed swamps. Here it feeds upon mollusks, insects
and small, tender pieces of aquatic plants.
Feeds along the edges of swamps and other water
bodies before breeding. Migrates to Northern Asia.
Prefers shallows of swamps, wetlands and
intertidal mudflats
A cryptic nocturnal species that usually roosts in
old-growth paperbark thickets during the day and
hunts at night along creeks and in wetlands. Prey
consists of insects, crustaceans, fish and
amphibians.
Extremely rare species preferring reed beds in
swamps where it is very secretive.
Prefers the shallows of the swamp where it feeds
by scooping its beak from side to side.
Migrates from Northern Asia for the peninsula
summer. Feeds within the edges and raised
grasslands of the swamp.
Migrates from Northern Asia for the peninsula
summer. Feeds within the edges and raised
grasslands of the swamp.
Retain and increase indigenous understorey and
habitat logs. Continue to control habitat changing
weeds and vermin.
Keep feeding sites free from pollutants and
roosting sites free of human disturbance.
Keep human and vermin disturbance away from
known sites.
Keep human and vermin disturbance away from
known sites.
Australasian Shoveler
Freckled Duck
Buff-banded Rail
Lewin’s Rail
Ballion’s Crake
Spotless Crake
Great Egret
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Australasian Bittern
Royal Spoonbill
Latham’s Snipe
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Black-fronted Dotterel
Exposed edges of the swamp where it is observed
feeding
Maintain dense vegetation around wetlands and
other water bodies.
Maintain dense vegetation around wetlands and
along creeks.
Maintain dense vegetation around wetlands and
along the creeks.
Maintain dense vegetation around wetlands and
along the creeks.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance
Maintain dense vegetation around wetlands and
along the creeks.
Maintain dense vegetation around known habitats
and along the creeks
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
249
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Habitat Requirements
Management Actions
Black-winged Stilt
Prefers the shallows of the swamp and feeds
within
Feeds along the coast scavenging for food and
builds a nest on the ground or ledge. During this
survey only observed flying overhead towards the
Rye Landfill site.
Observed flying over the swamp looking for prey.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Pacific Gull
Whiskered Tern
Whistling Kite
White-bellied Sea Eagle
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Collared Sparrow-hawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Peregrine Falcon
Musk Lorikeet
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
White-throated Needletail
Laughing Kookaburra
Yellow Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Crescent Honeyeater
Pink Robin
When soaring omits a whistling call and is usually
at home in woodlands near swamps, creeks, lakes
and coastal areas. It is a carrion eater but also
feeds upon mammals, birds and reptiles which are
the result of road kills
Observed hunting over the wetland and perched in
Swamp Scrub thickets. Non breeding
Seen soaring over the swampy and breeds at
nearby bushland sites. A carrion eater often seen
soaring on long, fingered upswept wings.
Small of the two goshawk species prefers most
habitats.
Hunts low over the swamp vegetation, but didn’t
breed.
Large raptor which migrates from central-northern
Australia to breed and feed in swamps. Breeds
within sanctuary hunting.
Observed in courtship display high over the swamp
on thermals. Nests on the cliffs along the
Mornington Peninsula National Park.
Migrates to the peninsula during late summerautumn to feed on various flowering eucalypts at
the time.
Roosts in tree hollows or dense thickets during the
day and hunts small mammals and large insects at
night.
Hunts within grasslands and the raised grassland
areas of the swamp. Roosts in dense scrub
thickets.
Occurs in the summer-autumn period where it
migrates from Northern Asia. Aerial, usually over
coastal and mountainous areas on the peninsula
and flies with flickering strokes, then long-winged
raking glides and slow turns.
Breeds in specific tree hollows and preys upon a
variety of fauna species.
Prefers lower rainfall areas such as dry eucalypt
forests and scrub
Prefers open woodlands and scrub sites especially
on the fringes of the swamp.
A small honeyeater which utilizes the scrub
canopies to feed and breed amongst. Here they
search for adult and larval insects, and spiders and
searches blossoms for nectar, insects and pollen.
They are often observed feeding upside-down
within tree canopies.
Migrates to the peninsula during autumn where it
was observed feeding in scrub patches.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Maintain habitat free of habitat changing weeds
and vermin.
Maintain wetland free of vermin and habitat
changing weeds
Maintain bushland in the greater area as some
larger fauna species within or nearby are ideal
food sources. Lobby to maintain rural areas around
their habitat.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
Maintain habitat free of habitat changing weeds
and vermin.
Keep roosting and breeding sites free of human
and vermin disturbance.
Protect and maintain woodland and scrub free of
habitat changing weeds.
Maintain old-growth trees with hollows which act
as roosting or breeding sites free of habitat
changing weeds.
Keep roosting and breeding sites free of human
and vermin disturbance.
No management required.
Keep roosting and breeding sites free of human
and vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and breeding sites free of human
and vermin disturbance.
Keep roosting and breeding sites free of human
and vermin disturbance.
Keep breeding and feeding sites free of vermin
disturbance and maintain free of habitat changing
weeds and die-back.
Keep roosting and feeding sites free of human and
vermin disturbance.
250
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Species
Habitat Requirements
Management Actions
Eastern Yellow Robin
Breeding resident of the scrub thickets throughout the swamp where it forages for insects
amongst the canopies and on the ground.
Migrates from northern Australia during spring.
Lives amongst reed beds and other dense
vegetation near water where it builds a nest
amongst the reeds. Diet consists of insects and
their bright song can b e heard in well watered
areas.
Keep breeding and feeding sites free of vermin
disturbance and maintain free of habitat changing
weeds and die-back.
Maintain dense Tall Marsh vegetation around the
swamp and along the creeks.
Visiting resident to the scrub thickets within the
swamp where it forages for insects amongst the
canopies.
Is solitary and occupies a range of habitats that
have year-round supply of ants and termites.
Needs hollow logs on ground to nest within and for
food.
Is solitary in nature and feeds after dark. Hides in
dense vegetation during the day.
Utilize tree hollows and loose bark as roost sites
through-out especially old-growth scrub patches.
Feeds on insects at night.
Prefers areas of dense undercover e.g. low-lying
vegetation and heaths that don’t become
inundated. Feeds on seeds and rhizomes and
excavates runways and burrows. After fire, habitat
is not usually suitable for some years.
Keep breeding and feeding sites free of vermin
disturbance and maintain free of habitat changing
weeds and die-back.
Do not remove fallen limbs or dead trees and
retain during possible controlled burns. Retain
ground cover and continue to remove threatening
weeds.
Maintain dense thickets and scrub free of weeds
and die-back. Control foxes and cats.
Retain, maintain and restore habitat. Implement a
bat-box program using a variety of designs. Control
habitat changing weeds and vermin.
Protect areas that have intact habitats and
understoreys. Continue to control vermin and
weeds.
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Mistletoebird
Short-beaked Echidna
Black Wallaby
Micro bat species occurring
through-out the study sites:
Swamp Rat
251
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
APPENDIX 11: Further detail of some of the fauna survey
techniques used during this assessment.
Decapod Crustacean
Decapod Crustaceans were sampled in bait traps and by site when assessing habitat in wet
areas.
Dip nets and fish bait traps
During drying out periods dip nets were scooped within water holes to sample for fish
species, which were found along the middle section of Hiscock Road Reserve. Small
rectangular bait traps obtained from most fishing tackle and supply shops are baited with
white bait and deployed into a water body. They are left for an hour or over-night and then
checked. Fish are identified and released at point of capture.
Amphibian call identification
Amphibians were identified whilst listening to male vocal calls and identifying each species
calls during day and spotlight walks. Some species were also identified by turning over logs
or debris near water bodies.
Visual bird detecting
Birds were identified by walking through out the study sites, listening to calls or looking
through binoculars and identifying individuals. Nocturnal birds were identified by calls and
sight during spotlight walks. Population densities of each bird species were recorded during
each month along with species breeding periods.
Elliot traps
Five days before and the full and new moons 15 Elliot traps were deployed along transects
in all of the study sites. They were deployed through-out appropriate habitats that offered
the best habitat for small mammal species and possible Swamp Skinks to be sampled. Fauna
sampled in Elliot traps included; Swamp Skinks, Blotched Blue-tongue, Swamp Rat and the
Introduce *Black Rat and *House Mouse. Bait used included peanut butter, rolled oats and
honey fixed with sardines.
Scat analysis
*Red Fox and *Feral Cat scats were relatively rare through-out the study sites and those
found were collected and hairs within were analyzed. Hairs belonging to Common Ringtail
Possum, Swamp Rat, *House Mouse and *Black Rat were found within the scats. Bird
feathers, fruits and insect material were also identified in some of the scats.
252
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Scats from indigenous mammals were also identified within the study sites.
Scout-guard cameras
Scout-guard cameras are designed to capture on photo or video fauna that passes through
its range either at night (infra-red) or during daylight (color). The images are stored within
the camera on SD cards. Cameras were deployed between October 2013 and April 2014 at
five of the study sites (3 Dutton Street, retarding basin, Hiscock Road Reserve, 40 Colchester
Road Reserve and Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve). All Scout-guard cameras (550V) were
fixed to a stake in a position so as to obtain the best video footage (30 second duration) of
the fauna interacting with the bait and lures. A tea infuser loaded with peanut butter, honey
and oats was deployed one meter from the terrestrial camera and peg down with a hair tube
peg. All cameras were configured similarly using the normal sensitivity and a delay of one
second between recordings. Any vegetation that may have obstructed view between the
camera and bait was carefully trimmed to minimize wind moving the vegetation, which
would trigger the camera. Each camera site was re-baited and SD cards down-loaded once a
fortnight during the project time frame.
The above shows a Scout-guard camera deployed within 40 Colchester Road Reserve. Photo M. Legg 2014.
253
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Spotlighting
Within all of the seven study sites spotlight walks were conducted over three nights during
mild weather conditions and nocturnal fauna were identified. Spotlight walks were
conducted a couple days before or just after the full and new moons.
Anabat 2 bat detector
Micro bats omit echo-location while flying around at night. Each species has a different call
frequency and thus their calls are detected and recorded on the Anabat 2 Bat Detector.
Those calls are down-loaded onto computer and analyzed using specialized software.
254
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
APPENDIX 12: Rapid assessment tool for analyzing the health of
natural ecosystems by assessing Fauna Environmental Indicator
Species (FEIS’s) within Broad Vegetation Types (BVT’S) found
within the study sites.
Different extinction levels are occurring on each allotment of remaining remnant native
vegetation through-out the Mornington Peninsula, Westernport catchment and the bioregion. This is based on the extinction rate of fauna species (in the past and at present)
within remaining bush land sites. Factors that determine extinction of fauna species within
remaining bush land sites include:
Size of remaining bush land, status of bush land health, amount of weed invasion, status of
feral populations, status of native fauna populations, whether the site has bio-links, the
determined future of the site and whether the site has tree hollows and fallen hollow logs. A
large healthy parcel of vegetation with bio-links will have a high number of species
diversity, where-as a small isolated parcel of vegetation with no bio-links will have a very
low diversity of fauna species.
Each ecosystem within remaining native vegetation allotments can be categorized into the
following processes of fauna extinctions which are all associated with post European
settlement disturbance of the past and or present. These processes are explained in the ‘5
phases of extinction’ which are based on fauna data collected and collaborated from over
500 sites on the Mornington Peninsula, several bushland sites within Frankston City and
other significant sites within the region and which have had fauna surveys conducted by
author Malcolm Legg in the last 15 years.
First phase
In the first phase of extinction the land has been cleared and only a few large and several
small areas of indigenous bush remain. These areas have mostly been set aside for national
parks and large foreshore reserves (Western Port side) which retain most species (especially
if feral works and weeding have been conducted) apart from larger carnivores (which have
been replaced by foxes and cats) and a few habitat specific species which are now extinct:
Tree Goanna, Emu, Spot-tailed Quoll, Eastern Quoll, Common Wombat, etc. Several
threatened species in phase two are still moderately common in this phase and most to all
FEIS’s (80% to 100%) still remain and are present in low to high population densities. Such
examples within the area include: Mornington Peninsula National Park, Point Nepean
255
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
National Park, Devilbend Reservoir, Westernport coastal bio-link from Tooradin to Flinders
and Quail Island. 80% to 100% of FEIS’s still remain.
Second phase
The second phase usually occurs in large bush land areas that have been set aside for state
parks, regional reserves and remaining large bush patches on private land. Usually between
10% and 20% of fauna species have become extinct or disappeared and several species are
either endangered or threatened at various levels. Around 60% to 80% of FEIS’s are present
in this phase and at reasonable numbers. Examples within the area include: Tootgarook
Swamp, Arthur’s Seat State Park, Peninsula Gardens Bush land Reserve, Mt Eliza Regional
Park, Mt Martha Regional Park, Warringine Park, and Tootgarook Wetland etc.
Third phase
Phase 3 usually occurs in small sized Parks Vic. Reserves, some foreshore reserves (Port
Phillip Bay side), council reserves that retain good habitat, and smaller patches on private
land. Most of these sites have weed infestations which has killed of essential understory
including old-growth eucalypts with hollows and feral fauna dominates. Several species are
threatened at a regional and local level. Some state significant species still remain and
possibly one or two nationally threatened species. Several FEIS’s have disappeared and the
health of the ecosystem is usually poor and failing. Some examples include rural roadsides,
large urban bushland reserves usually over five hectares, small rural allotments usually
under 10 hectares and on private property which are less than 10 hectares in size with some
remnant bush land. 40% to 60% of FEIS’s still remain.
Fourth phase
Phase 4 extinction rate can usually be associated to Urbanization or highly degraded
remnant rural sites. The only indigenous habitat that remains is a few isolated pockets along
creeks, drainage lines and small shire reserves. Majority of these sites are highly degraded
and facing extinction in the final stages. 20% to 30% of fauna species remains but several
are quickly depleted by domestic cats, dogs and vermin. 20% to 40% of FEIS’s still remain
and several FEIS’s have become extinct or disappeared. However a low percentage of
significant species could still remain. Noisy Miners dominate on the fringes and chase
smaller essential insect gleaming birds away.
256
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Fifth phase
The fifth and final phase can be associated with suburbanization and rural allotments that
have been 100% cleared of native vegetation, replanted with pine or conifer rows and
European plants around the house. 90% to 100% of all fauna species have become extinct or
disappeared apart from a few common species and introduced fauna species thrive. New
vegetation planted within urban areas is usually exotic or non-indigenous and attracts
exotic species and out of balanced native bird species. All significant and most FEIS’s have
disappeared or become extinct with 0% to 20% of FEIS’s still remaining.
Fauna Environmental Indicator Species (FEIS’S)
How do we measure the health of ecosystems within remaining bush land sites in-order to
be able to categorize each bush land site into the above five extinction phases? This can be
achieved by assessing each site and determining how many FEIS’s remain. FEIS’s are a
justification for the health of a particular ecosystem and are thus categorized using habitat
specific fauna species which quickly disappear from an ecosystem which has been or
continues to be altered by humans. These processes occur due to lack-of or changed
management practices of pre 1750 Australia and includes weed invasion, lack of appropriate
fire regimes, clearing practices, high predation by introduced predators, displacement by
introduced fauna etc.
The author has determined which FEIS’s fits into each broad vegetation community that still
exists within Mornington Peninsula and around Westernport catchment and are listed below.
257
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
FEIS’s within broad vegetation types
Table 125: EVC’s that fit into Broad Vegetation Types (BVT).
EVC’s
Broad Vegetation Types
CB
W
DS
HrW
SH
CS
M
LF
RS
RF
HrFF
DF
H
W
SS
ESS
SR
W
PG
W
SW
MS
CD
S
CH
S
CT
G
CHrW
G
W
BG
S
AH
BW
DH
DH
W
CA
S
SzCS
CD
G
G
W
SW
Forest
Y
Y
Y
Y
Woodland
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Scrub (coastal)
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Scrub (Wet sites)
Y
Y
Y
Grassland
Y
Y
Y
Y
Heathland
Y
Y
Drainagelines
Y
Riparian Zone
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Creeks
Y
Y
Y
Coastal
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Wetlands & Swamps
Y
Y
Y
Y
Salt Marsh
Y
Mangroves
Y
KEY to EVC’s
CBW-Coast Banksia Woodland, DSH-rW-Damp Sands Herb-rich Woodland, SH-Sand Heathland, CSM-Coastal Salt Marsh, LF-Lowland Forest, RS-Riparian Scrub, RF-Riparian Forest, H-rFF-Herb-rich Foothill Forest, DF-Damp Forest, HW-Heathy Woodland, SS-Swamp Scrub, ESS-Estuarine Swamp Scrub, SRW-Swampy Riparian
Woodland, PGW-Plains Grassy Wetland, SW-Sedge Wetland, MS-Mangrove Shrubland, CDS- Coastal Dune Scrub, CHS-Coastal Headland Scrub, CTG-Coastal Tussock Grassland, CH-rW-Creekline Herb-rich Woodland, GW-Grassy Woodland, BGS-Berm Grassy Shrubland, AH-Aquatic Herbland, BW-Brackish Wetland, DH-Damp
Heathland, DHW-Damp Heathy Woodland, CAS-Coastal Alkaline Scrub, S-zCS-Spray-zone Coastal Shrubland, CDG-Coastal Dune Grassland, GW-Gully Woodland and SW-Swampy Woodland.
Key to FEIS’s within broad vegetation types
RF -Rain Forest, F -Forest, W- Woodland, GL -Grassland, SCo -Coastal Scrub, SWA- Scrub in wet areas, H -Heath, DL -Drainage lines, RZ -Riparian Zone, C -Creeks, Co -Coastal, WL&S -Wetlands and Swamps, M&S -Mangroves and Salt Mash and HR-Habitat Requirements
Table 126: FEIS’s of broad vegetation communities.
FEIS’s and seasons to survey for FEIS’s
DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS
Engaeus sps. (All)
RF
F
W
Y
Y
Y
GL
SCo
SWA
H
Y
DL
RZ
C
Y
Y
Y
Co
WL&
S
Y
Y
Helograspsus sp (All)
FISH
Spotted Galaxias (All)
Broad-finned Galaxias (All)
Dwarf Galaxias (All)
AMPHIBIANS
Victorian Smooth Froglet (Autumn)
Southern Toadlet (Autumn)
Growling Grass Frog (November to January)
REPTILES
Common Long-necked Tortoise (All)
Tree Dragon (Spring till autumn)
Swamp Skink (Spring)
Southern Water Skink (Spring)
Whites Skink (Spring)
Eastern Three-lined Skink (Spring)
Delicate Skink (Spring)
McCoy’s Skink (Autumn & winter)
Metallic Skink (Autumn)
Glossy Grass Skink (Spring)
Southern Grass Skink (Autumn)
Blotched Blue-tongue (Spring)
Common Blue-tongue (Spring)
White-lipped Snake (Spring)
M&
S
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Dry swampy sites which are inundated in winter.
Dry swampy sites which are inundated in winter.
Deep fresh water with reeds.
Y
Fresh-water bodies.
Dry vegetation & fallen timber with hollows.
Wet sites with Decapod. Crustacean burrows.
Riparian and coastal veg. with high rainfall.
Dry vegetation & fallen timber with hollows.
Sedgy and grassy understorey.
Sedgy & grassy understorey & fallen hollow logs.
Grassy understorey with fallen hollow logs.
Grassy understorey & fallen hollow logs.
Slightly elevated veg. around wetland edges.
Grassy understorey & fallen hollow logs.
Sedgy & grassy understorey & fallen hollow logs.
Sedgy & grassy understorey & fallen hollow logs.
Sedgy & grassy understorey & fallen hollow logs.
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Damp & wet areas.
Coastal Salt Marsh.
Lower reaches of creeks.
Upper reaches of creek.
Swampy parts of creek.
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
HR
258
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
FEIS’s
BIRDS
Painted Button Quail (Autumn)
Red-capped Plover (Spring)
Lewin’s Rail (Spring)
Buff-banded Rail (Spring)
Ballions Crake (Spring)
Spotless Crake (Spring)
Australasian Bittern (Spring & summer)
Nankeen Night Heron (Spring)
Royal Spoonbill (All)
Eastern Rosella (All)
Crimson Rosella (All)
Blue-winged Parrot (Autumn)
Southern Boobook (Spring)
Powerful Owl (May to June)
Sacred Kingfisher (Spring till early autumn)
White-throated Treecreeper Spring)
Varied Sitella (Spring)
Southern Emu-wren (Spring till early autumn)
Striated Field wren (Spring)
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater (spring)
White-eared Honeyeater (All)
Singing Honeyeater (Spring)
Brown-headed Honeyeater (Spring)
Crescent Honeyeater (Spring)
New Holland Honeyeater (Spring)
White-fronted Chat (Spring)
Pink Robin (Spring)
Eastern Yellow Robin (Spring)
Crested Shrike-tit (Winter & spring)
Grey Shrike-thrush (All)
Golden Whistler (Spring)
Rufous Whistler (Spring)
Grey Fantail (All)
Rufous Fantail (Spring and autumn)
Satin Flycatcher (Spring till early autumn)
Grey Currawong (Spring)
Mistletoebird (Spring and autumn)
Stubble Quail (Spring)
Brush Bronzewing (Spring)
Clamorous Reed Warbler (late spring to summer)
Golden=headed Cisticola
Little Grassbird
Great Egret
MAMMALS
Short-beaked Echidna (Spring to autumn)
Agile Antechinus (Winter & spring)
Dusky Antechinus (Winter & spring)
White-footed Dunnart (August till October)
Southern Brown Bandicoot (Winter to autumn)
Long-nosed Bandicoot (Winter & spring)
Sugar Glider (Spring till autumn)
Feathertail Glider (Spring)
Black Wallaby (All)
Water Rat (Spring till autumn)
Southern Forest Bat (Spring till autumn)
Large Forest Bat (Spring till autumn)
Swamp Rat (All)
Totals
RF
F
W
GL
SCo
Y
Y
Y
SWA
H
DL
RZ
C
Co
WL&
S
M&
S
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
?
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
26
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
38
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
32
Y
Y
33
Y
Y
Y
47
Y
21
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
21
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
43
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
51
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
10
21
Y
26
17
HR
Sedgy & grassy understoreys.
Coastal with washed up seaweed.
Grassy & sedgy understory along creeks & coastal.
Grassy & sedgy understory along creeks & coastal.
Sedges and reeds around wetlands.
Sedges and reeds around wetlands.
Sedges and reeds around wetlands or creeks.
Roosting in Swamp Paperbark thickets.
Wetlands, swamps and coastal.
Forests & woodlands, tree hollows for breeding.
Forests & woodlands, tree hollows for breeding.
Coastal Salt Marsh.
Forest, woodlands and scrub, hollow for breeding.
Forest, woodlands and scrub, hollow for breeding.
Forest & woodland, tree hollow for breeding.
Forest & woodland, tree hollow for breeding.
Forests and woodlands.
Coastal Grasslands & salt marsh and heathland. Coastal Grasslands & salt
marsh.
Coastal Scrub & woodland.
Forests, woodlands and scrub.
Coastal Scrub.
Forests and woodlands.
Coastal scrub and scrub along water courses.
Forests, woodlands and scrub.
Edges of wetlands and Coastal Salt Marsh.
Forests and woodlands.
Forests, woodlands and scrub.
Trunks of gums along water courses.
Forests, woodlands and scrub.
Forests, woodlands and scrub.
Forests, woodlands and scrub along water course.
Forests, woodlands and scrub.
Gullies of Forest and woodlands (higher rainfall).
Forests and woodlands.
Forests and woodlands.
Forests, woodlands and scrub.
Scrub, grasslands and intact understories.
Grasslands and intact understories.
Common Reed etc to nest in.
Tall grasses, indigenous or exotic.
Tall grasses, indigenous or exotic.
Open wet areas to feed and mangroves to roost.
Intact understories and fallen logs with hollows.
Forests, woodlands & scrub with tree hollows.
Forests, with intact understory & fallen logs.
Coastal woodlands, scrub & grasslands, fallen logs.
Grassy & heathy woodlands with understorey,
Coastal woodlands, scrub & grasslands.
Forests & woodlands with tree hollows.
Forests & woodlands with tree hollows.
Forests. Woodlands, scrub and grasslands.
Water bodies including coastal.
Forests and woodlands with tree hollows.
Forests and woodlands with tree hollows.
Most habitats with intact understories.
259
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Map 12
South-west corner of 3 Dutton Street
Locations of fauna sampling sites.
KEY
Study site boundaries
Route of monthly bird count and spotlight walks
Elliot trap transects
Scout-guard cameras
260
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
MAP 13
Rosebud Industrial Estate retarding basin
Locations of fauna sampling sites
KEY
Reserve boundaries
Route of monthly bird count and spotlight walks
Elliot trap transects
Bait traps
Scout-guard cameras
261
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Map 14
Hiscock Road Reserve Locations of fauna sampling sites
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
KEY
Study site boundaries
Route of monthly bird count and spotlight walks
Elliot trap transects
Dip netting
Scout-guard cameras
262
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Map 15
40 Colchester Road Reserve
Locations of fauna sampling sites.
KEY
Reserve boundaries
Route of monthly bird count and spotlight walks
Elliot trap transects
Scout-guard cameras
263
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Map 16
Sanctuary Park Bushland Reserve Locations
of fauna sampling sites.
KEY
Reserve boundaries
Route of monthly bird count and spotlight walks
Elliot trap transects
Bait traps
Scout-guard camera
264
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Map 17
Truemans Road landfill site (eastern boundary)
Locations of fauna sampling sites.
KEY
Study site boundaries
Land fill boundaries
Route of monthly bird count and spotlight walks
Elliot trap transects
265
Fauna assessments of seven Mornington Peninsula Reserves located within Tootgarook Wetland, June 25th 2014.
Reach 1
Reach 2
Map 18
Tern Avenue Bushland
Reserve
Locations of fauna
sampling sites.
KEY
Reserve boundaries
Route of monthly bird
count and spotlight walks
Elliot trap transects
Reach 3
266