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Forms of Network Attacks
Gabriel Owens
COSC 352
February 24, 2011
Roadmap

Definition

Different Forms of Attacks

Prevention

Conclusion

Questions??
Definition
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What is a network attack?
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Passive
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Active
Different Types of Attack
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Eavesdropping
Data Modification
Identity Spoofing (IP Address Spoofing)
Password Based Attacks
Denial of Service Attack
Man-In-The-Middle-Attack
Compromised-Key Attack
Sniffer Attack
Application-Layer Attack
Eavesdropping
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Majority of network communications occur in
an unsecured or “cleartext” format.
Allows attacker to “listen in” or read the
network traffic.
Known as Sniffing or Snooping
Biggest security issue faced by network
administrators in an enterprise.
Eavesdropping (cont.)
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Prevention
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In order to prevent the eavesdropping of
data traversed on your network, you must
have strong encryption services based on
cryptography.
Identity Spoofing
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Computers are identified in an operating
system or network by a valid IP Address.
Possible for IP Address to be falsely assumed
(identity spoofing).
Special Programs to construct IP packets that
appear to originate from valid addresses
inside the corporate intranet.
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After gaining access with a valid IP, attacker can
modify, delete or reroute your data, As well as
perform a number of other attacks.
Data Modification
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Step One – Read Data
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Step Two – Alter Data
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Modify data in the packet without the knowledge
of the sender or receiver.
Example: Purchase Requisitions, exchange of
items, amounts and billing information
Password Based Attacks
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Access Rights to a computer or network resources
are determined by who you are (username and
password)
If an attacker gains access to a valid user account he
is able to do whatever that user can do
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Obtain lists of valid user and computer names and network
information.
Modify server and network configurations, including access
controls and routing tables.
Modify, reroute, or delete your data.
Denial of Service Attack
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Prevents normal use of computer or network by valid
users (Unlike Password Based Attack)
After gaining access to the network
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Randomize the attention of your internal Information
Systems staff so that they do not see the intrusion
immediately, which allows the attacker to make more
attacks during the diversion.
Send invalid data to applications or network services, which
causes abnormal termination or behavior of the applications
or services.
Flood a computer or the entire network with traffic until a
shutdown occurs because of the overload.
Block traffic, which results in a loss of access to network
resources by authorized users.
Man-In-The-Middle Attack
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Attacker is monitoring, capturing and controlling data
sent between you and the person whom you are
communicating with transparently
At low levels of communication on the network layer,
computers might not be able to determine with
whom they are exchanging data.
Attacker assumes your identity and attempts to
gather as much information as possible, while the
person you’re communicating with thinks it is you.
Compromised-Key Attack
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Definition: Key – A secret code or number
that is needed to interpret secured
information.
Obtaining a Key: Difficult and ResourceIntensive, but possible.
Attacker can use key to gain access on a
secured communication without the
knowledge of either party.
Can also use key to attempt computation of
additional keys, which would lead to access to
other secure communications.
Sniffer Attack
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Definition: Sniffer – An application or device
that can read, monitor, and capture network
data exchanges and read network packets.
If packets aren’t encrypted, the Sniffer
provides a full view of the data inside the
packets.
Using a Sniffer, an attacker is capable of:
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Analyzing your network and gain information to
eventually cause your network to crash or to
become corrupted.
Read your communications.
Application-Layer Attack
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Targets application servers by
deliberately causing a fault in the
server’s operating system or
applications.
Results in the attacker gaining the
ability to bypass normal access controls.
Capable of the same damages as a
man-in-the-middle attack
Application-Layer (cont.)
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Once the attacker has gained access, he can
do any of the following:
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Read, add, delete, or modify your data or operating system.
Introduce a virus program that uses your computers and
software applications to copy viruses throughout your
network.
Introduce a Sniffer program to analyze your network and
gain information that can eventually be used to crash or to
corrupt your systems and network.
Abnormally terminate your data applications or operating
systems.
Disable other security controls to enable future attacks.
Prevention
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Always have some type of security plan
in place.
Have some sort of encryption service
based on cryptography.
Make sure all applications are up-todate in order to have as little
vulnerabilities as possible.
Video
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Denial of Service Attack - Example
Resources
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"Common Types of Network Attacks." Microsoft TechNet:
Resources for IT Professionals. Web. 24 Feb. 2011.
<http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/cc959354.aspx#mainSection>.
"Strengthen Application Defenses to Prevent Network Attacks |
TechRepublic." TechRepublic - A Resource for IT Professionals.
Web. 24 Feb. 2011.
<http://www.techrepublic.com/article/strengthen-applicationdefenses-to-prevent-network-attacks/5034342>.
"Network Security Types of Attack Passive Attack Active."
Complete Computer Networking Notes Guides Tutorials. Web.
24 Feb. 2011.
<http://computernetworkingnotes.com/ccna_certifications/types
_of_attack.htm>.
Questions

Questions??