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FP1.M1.X
FP1.M2.X
FP1.M3.X
FP2.M1.X
FP2.M2.X
FP2.M3.X
FP1.M1.Y
FP1.M2.Y
FP1.M3.Y
FP2.M1.Y
FP2.M2.Y
FP2.M3.Y
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Percent Contribution to Uncertainty of COP Measurement
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0
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Resolution
Uniformity
Repeatability
Nonlinearity
Hysteresis
Resolution
Uniformity
Repeatability
Nonlinearity
Hysteresis
Resolution
Uniformity
Repeatability
Nonlinearity
Hysteresis
Resolution
Uniformity
Repeatability
Nonlinearity
Hysteresis
0
Causes
Figure B.7 Pareto chart for COP measurements.
B.4.
B.4.1.
Gage Study for 3D Kinematics
Background
In this study, a OSS was used to estimate the pose of the musculoskeletal model segments (trunk
and pelvis) and box relative to the global reference system (MaxPRO, Innovision Systems, Inc.).
The OSS used a system of six charged-couple device (CCD) cameras (Basler-scout, 659×494 px
@119 Hz, progressive CCD) with an array of infrared light-emitting diodes mounted around the
lens of each camera, to track the 3D position of a set of retroreflective markers affixed to body
segments and to the handled box. The OSS detects the reflections of the infrared straboscopic light
by the highly retroreflective passive markers. The reflected by the passive markers light is optically
registred by the cameras and electronically converted to digital information, i.e.,—3D coordinates.
The 3D coordinates are then processed to obtain linear and angular kinematic variables. The
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