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M.S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
(An Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)
Department of Mechanical Engineering
MSR Nagar Post, Bangalore – 56 0054
Scheme of Teaching / Subjects / Syllabus
Master of Technology (M-Tech)
In
COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (CIM)
1
Programme Educational Objectives (PEO)
The Mechanical Engineering Program, M.Tech-CIM is a four semester course and will
provide the advanced building blocks for conceptualizing, understanding and optimizing
manufacturing systems integrated with computer based applications. These building blocks
will include advanced materials, traditional and non-traditional manufacturing methods,
Advanced trends in manufacturing management, Robotics, Computer aided design, Flexible
Manufacturing Systems, Computer control in manufacturing systems, Condition based
Maintenance, Automation in manufacturing, Advanced material Technology, Rapid
Prototyping, etc. the course includes an individual project work by the student to help him
understand his learning and apply the principles to practical situations and would enable the
student to be technically and professionally equipped and improve for taking up challenges in
the industrial sector, government organization, research organizations and pursuing higher
studies or for starting his or her own industry or entrepreneurship.
Specific objectives of this program are (PEOs):
1. Provide in-depth engineering knowledge in CIM
2. Develop creative mathematical skills for modelling to address design and
optimization in CIM.
3. Introduce statistical skills and tools in manufacturing
4. To provide opportunities for a candidate to acquire entrepreneurial skills in the area
of CIM
5. To provide opportunities for a practicing engineer to update with technical skills in
CIM
6. To generate human resources to take up profession in R & D, automation industries
and teaching in the field of CIM
Program Outcome (POs):
The post graduate students of MSRIT-CIM are expected to have acquired the following
a) They will demonstrate advanced knowledge in Modeling, Simulation, Visualization
and programmable solutions to industrial applications.
b) Graduates will demonstrate an ability to identify, formulate and solve mechanical
engineering problems.
c) Graduates will demonstrate an ability to design and conduct experiments, analyse the
data, and interpret the experimental results.
d) Graduates will demonstrate the ability to design a system, components, or process and
meet specific objectives keeping in view the economical approaches, availability of
materials and manufacturability with increased life.
e) They will demonstrate on ability to visualize and work in laboratory and
multidisciplinary tasks.
f) They also will demonstrate skills to use modern engineering tools, software and
equipments to analyze and solve problem, Each graduate will imbibe and demonstrate
knowledge of ethical responsibilities.
2
g) The Engineers shall possess good communication skills to effectively communicate
both verbally, written form and through drawings
h) The graduates show the understanding of the impact of engineering solutions or
society in global and economic context.
i) The graduates shall be motivated to engage themselves in continuous learning process
will develop confidence for self education and ability for lifelong learning.
j) They shall have the knowledge and ability to respond to the happenings/
contemporary issues of the country.
k) Graduates can participate and succeed in the competitive examinations and research
work.
l) Manage project and finance effectively.
What
To whom
E
Direct
Assessment
Method
Max.
Marks
Evidence
Collected
Contributing
to Course
Outcomes
Internal
assessment
tests
Thrice
(Average of the
best two will be
computed)
30
Blue books
1 to 6
Class-room
open book
assignment
Twice
10
1 to 6
(5+5)
Assignment
reports
Viva-voce
Once
5
Viva sheets
Recollection
skills
Quiz test
Once
5
Quiz answers
Recollection
skills
C
I
When / Where
(Frequency in
the Course
Students
S
Standard
examination
End of course
(Answering 5 of
10 questions)
E
100
1 to 6
Answer Scripts
E
Indirect
Assessment
Methods
Middle of the
course
Students Feedback
--
Feedback forms
--
Questionnaire
Students
End of course survey
End of course
3
1 to 6,
Effectiveness
of delivery
of
instructions
and
assessment
methods
Sl.
Course outcomes
a
b
X
X
c
d
e
f
i
X
X
j
k
l
X
X
X
X
No.
X
1.
Provide in-depth engineering knowledge in CIM
2.
Develop creative mathematical skills for modelling to X X X
address design and optimization in CIM.
3.
Introduce statistical skills and tools in manufacturing
4.
To provide opportunities for a candidate to acquire X X X
entrepreneurial skills in the area of CIM
5.
To provide opportunities for a practicing engineer to update X X X X X X
with technical skills in CIM
6.
To generate human resources to take up profession in R & X X
D, automation industries and teaching in the field of CIM
4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
M.S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE
(An Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)
SCHEME OF TEACHING
BREAK DOWN OF SUBJECT WISE CREDIT DISTRIBUTION
Semester
Core
Project
Electives
Seminar
/ Total Subjects
Work
17
08
02
I
14
12
02
II
12
9
02
III
22
IV
31
32
31
06
Total
Total
27
28
23
22
100
I SEMESTER M.Tech (Computer Integrated Manufacturing)
Sl.
Subject
No
Code
.
1
MCIM 11
Computational Numerical Methods
2
MCIM 12
Finite Element Methods
3
MCIM 13
Advanced Topics in Manufacturing Management
Subject
Credits
Teaching
Dept.
L
T
P
Total
Mathematics
3
1
0
4
4
0
0
4
4
0
1
5
4
0
0
4
-
2
-
2
Mechanical
Engineering
4
MCIM 14
CAD for Manufacturing
5
MCIM 15
Seminar-I
6
Elective – I
4
0
0
4
7
Elective – II
4
0
0
4
23
3
1
27
Total
II SEMESTER M.Tech (Computer Integrated Manufacturing)
Sl.
No Subject Code
.
1 MCIM 21
Teaching
Dept.
Subject
Credits
L
T
P
Total
Statistical modelling and experimental methods
in Manufacturing
4
1
0
5
4
0
0
4
4
0
1
5
-
2
-
2
2
MCIM 22
Industrial Robotics
3
MCIM 23
Flexible Manufacturing Systems
4
MCIM 24
Seminar – II
5
Elective – III
4
0
0
4
6
Elective – IV
4
0
0
4
Mechanical
Engineering
5
7
Elective –V
Total
4
0
0
4
24
3
1
28
III SEMESTER M.Tech (Computer Integrated Manufacturing)
Credit
Sl.No. Subject Code
Subject
Teaching Dept.
L
T
P
Total
1
MCIM 31
Seminar – III
0
2
0
2
2
MCIM 32
Project Preliminaries
0
9
0
9
3
Elective-VI
4
0
0
4
4
Elective-VII
4
0
0
4
5
Elective-VIII
4
0
0
4
12
11
0
23
Mechanical
Engineering
Total
IV SEMESTER M.Tech (Computer Integrated Manufacturing)
Sl.
No.
Subject
Code
1
MCIM 41
Credits
Subject
Teaching Dept.
Mechanical
Engineering
Project Work
Total
L – Lecture Hours
T – Tutorial Hours
L
T
P
Total
0
0
22
22
0
0
22
22
P – Practical/Seminar
* Scheme of Examination: In all theory courses students are required to answer one
question from each unit
6
LIST OF ELECTIVES
NO.
Sub. Code
Subject
Credits
1
MCIM-E01
Computer Control of Manufacturing Systems
4:0:0
2
MCIM-E02
Management Information Systems
4:0:0
3
MCIM-E03
Tooling for Manufacturing in Automation
4:0:0
4
MCIM-E04
Condition Based maintenance
4:0:0
5
MCIM-E05
Advanced Topics in Manufacturing
4:0:0
6
MCIM-E06
Reverse Engineering
4:0:0
7
MCIM-E07
Automation in Manufacturing
4:0:0
8
MCIM-E08
Machine Tool Dynamics
4:0:0
9
MCIM-E09
Modelling and Simulation of Manufacturing Systems
4:0:0
10
MCIM-E10
Sensor Application in Manufacturing
4:0:0
11
MCIM-E11
Computer Aided Process Planning
4:0:0
12
MCIM-E12
Rapid Prototyping ( Additive Manufacturing )
4:0:0
13
MCIM-E13
Advances in Non – Traditional Machining
4:0:0
14
MCIM-E14
Industrial Design and Ergonomics
4:0:0
15
MCIM-E15
Advanced Material Technology
4:0:0
Students have to earn a total of 100 credits by choosing subjects from the above list of
electives.
7
COMPUTATIONAL NUMERICAL METHODS
Course Code: MMSE11
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 3:1:0
Preamble:
The course aims to introduce Numerical methods which provide constructive methods for
obtaining numerical solutions to practical engineering problems for which exact solutions by
analytical methods are difficult and time consuming.
Course Objectives:
The Student will
1. Learn the concept of different types of errors.
2. Learn mathematical modeling of some physical problems.
3. Learn to obtain a root of algebraic and transcendental equations.
4. Learn the concept of differentiation and integration of a tabulated function.
5. Learn to solve system of linear algebraic equations and to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of
a given square matrix.
6. Learn the concept of linear transformation matrix of linear transformation, linear models and
Gram-Schmidt Process.
UNIT – I
Approximations and round off errors: Significant figures, accuracy and precision, error
definitions, round off errors and truncation errors. Mathematical modeling and Engineering
problem solving: Simple mathematical model, Conservation Laws of Engineering.
Roots of Equations: Bracketing methods – Newton-Raphson method, Multiple roots, Simple
fixed point iteration.
UNIT – II
Roots of polynomial-Polynomials in Engineering and Science, Muller’s method, Graeffe’s
Roots Squaring Method.
Numerical Differentiation and Numerical Integration: Newton-Cotes and Guass Quadrature
Integration formulae, integration of Equations, Romberg integration, Numerical Differentiation
Applied to Engineering problems, High Accuracy differentiation formula.
UNIT – III
System of Linear Algebraic Equations And Eigen Value Problems: Introduction, Gauss
Elimination Method, Gauss-Jordan Elimination Method, Triangularization method, Cholesky
Method, Partition method, error Analysis for direct methods, iteration Methods.
UNIT – IV
Eigen values and Eigen Vectors: Bounds on Eigen Values, Jacobi method for symmetric
matrices, Givens method for symmetric matrices, Householder’s method for symmetric
matrices, Rutishauser method for arbitrary matrices, Power method.
8
UNIT – V
Linear Transformation: Introduction to Linear Transformation, The matrix of Linear
Transformation, Linear Models in Science and Engg.
Orthogonality and Least Squares: Inner product, length and orthogonality, orthogonal sets,
Orthogonal projections, The Gram-Schmidt process, Least Square problems, Inner product
spaces.
Text books:
1. S S Sastry – “Numerical Analysis for Engineers” – Tata Mcgraw Hill Edition.
2. Steven C Chapra, Raymond P Canale – Numerical Methods for Engineers – fourth
Edition, Tata Mcgraw Hill.
3. M K Jain, S R K Iyengar, R K Jain – Numerical Methods for Scientific and Engg.
Computation – New Age International Publishers.
Reference books:
1. Prevez Moin – Application of Numerical Methods to Engineering.
2. David C Lay – Linear Algebra and its Applications – 3rd Edition, Pearson Education.
Course Outcomes:
The Student will be able to
1. Model some simple mathematical models of physical Applications.
2. Find the roots of polynomials that arise in Science and Engineering problems.
3. Differentiate and integrate a function for a given set of tabulated data, for Engineering
Applications.
4. Solve the system of linear equations by different methods that arise in Science and Engineering
Problems.
5. Find eigenvalues and eigenvectors which deals with the modeling of the system and the
behavior of the system.
6. Find orthogonal or orthonormal basis using Gram-Schmidt Process.
9
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS
Subject Code : MMSE 12 / MCIM 12
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble
Finite Element Method is proving to be a very powerful technique of solving and analyzing
complex engineering problems. It is a numerical method which yields fairly accurate results for
complex engineering problems and of late has emerged as a very rapidly growing area of
research for applied mathematics. Its usefulness in various branches of engineering is due to
the ease with which the method is made amenable to computer programming, leading to a
process of iterative design.
Its uniqueness lies in the fact that complex engineering problems having no analytical solutions
can be solved with ease and iterative designs can be worked out.
Of late, this technique has found a lot of applications in the area of manufacturing as newer and
specialized techniques and materials are being used with changing technology. In this context
it is desirable to introduce the subject of FEM in the curriculum of PG course of CIM to train
the students for developing skills for designing and analyzing the various manufacturing
processes to arrive at an optimized process. The method can also be used in the development of
machine tools, newer materials and failure analysis of processes.
Course Learning Objectives
1. Introduce the various aspects of FEM as applied to engineering problems in a
systematic manner and impart the knowledge of fundamentals of Theory of Elasticity,
Calculus of Variation and Matrix Methods.
2. Apply the fundamental concepts of mathematical methods and theory of elasticity to
solve simple continuum mechanics problems.
3. Define the element properties such as shape function and stiffness matrix for the
various elements and Formulate element properties for 1D and 2D elements.
4. Develop skill to solve simple truss and beam problems using the steps of FEM and
Develop competence to analyze vibration problems of beams.
5. Develop an understanding of working of commercial FEM software and to be aware of
the latest state of the art of research
UNIT – I
Introduction to Equilibrium equations in elasticity
Calculus of variation, Euler’s Lagrange’s equation, weighted residual approach, principal of
minimum potential energy, Rayleigh – Ritz method, problems Finite Element Method: Steps,
application and advantages of FEM.
UNIT – II
Shape functionsDerivation for liner simplex element, element stiffness matrix, FEM equation by variation
approach and Galerkin approach boundary condition problems on axially loaded member
temperature effect. Numerical integration using 1, 2 and 3 points Gaussian quadrature formula.
10
UNIT – III
Geometric isotropy
Pascal triangle Pascal pyramid order of the interpolating polynomial convergence criteria,
compatibility requirement, CST Element, LST Element, Rectangular Element Shape Function
of higher order 1D 2D element, Lagrange interpolation function ISO parametric representation
of CST and Quadrilateral Elements.
UNIT – IV
Truss Element
Deviation of stiffness Matrix for in local coordinate and global coordinates, Truss element
analysis of truss problem axi symmetry truss problem Beam Element: Hermit Shape Function
for beam element, Stiffness matrix, Load vector.
UNIT – V
Loading condition
Shear force and bending moment, problems, Dynamic Analysis: Dynamic Equation of motion,
consistent and lumped mass matrices, free vibration analysis, Eigen Values and Equation
vectors.
Text books:
1. Introduction to Finite Element in Engineering R Chandrupatla and Belegundi, Prentice
Hall India Pub 2006.
2. The Finite Element Methods in Engineering – SS Rao, Butter worth Heinemann Pub 2005.
3. A First Course in FEM – By Daryl. L. Logan, Thomas & Learning, Pub 2007.
Reference Books
1. Finite Element Analysis Theory & Programming - C S Krishnamurthy –
Tata Mc Graw Hill, Pub 2000.
2. The Finite Element Method – Zienkilewicz, OC-Tata Mc Graw Hill, Pub 1979.
Course Outcomes
1. Evaluate and compare FEM with other numerical methods and Compile fundamentals of
theory of elasticity, calculus of variation and matrix methods for engineering applications.
2. Develop ability to identify a problem and apply the fundamental concepts of theory of
elasticity and matrix methods for continuum mechanics problems.
3. Demonstrate the ability to define and formulate the element properties for 1D and 2D
elements.
4. Develop the skills of solving truss and beam problems for various loading conditions and
competence to design and analyse problems of engineering particularly having relevance to
manufacturing and of current techniques and technologies.
5. Demonstrate ability to make use of commercial software to solve complex problems.
11
ADVANCED TOPICS IN MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT
Course Code : MCIM13
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 4:0:1
Preamble:
The subject helps the student to understand how exactly the manufacturing system interacts
with outside and inside environment to perform and excel in its operations known as system
theory concept and simulate the same and interpret it. The subject also deals with the different
techniques of improving productivity in detail and helps the student to understand and apply
the same for his practical applications. With this the student will be able to assess the value of a
product and the system performance by using zero base budgeting, logistics management and
life cycle costing principles.
Course learning objectives:
1. To learn about the Manufacturing system theory concept and system simulation
2. To learn about the different techniques for improvement of productivity
3. To learn the analytical method of MRP with suitable case studies
4. To learn the advanced techniques of increasing productivity like shigoshingo principles,
TQC, Zero defect theory.
5. To learn the concept of Value engineering and To learn the concept of Zero base
budgeting , logistics management and life cycle costing
UNIT – I
System theory concepts and system simulation
As applied to manufacturing, Flexible production system and continuous flow production,
Productivity in manufacturing systems.
9 Hrs
UNIT – II
Different techniques for improvement of productivity
Material requirement planning, JIT, KANBAN and Kaizen system
9 Hrs
UNIT – III
Management by objectives
Quality circles, CAD, CAM, CIM, ROBOTICS, GT, SMED-Techniques, Product quality team
approach
9 Hrs
UNIT – IV
Flexi time
Job rotation, Shojunca ergonomical, Total Quality Control, zero defect theory, statistical
process control
9 Hrs
UNIT – V
Concepts of value engineering
Value analysis zero base budgeting Introduction to logistics. Management, terotechnology and
life cycle costing
9 Hrs
Text books:
1. Richard T Schonberger, “Japanese Manufacturing Techniques”, Free Press 1982.
2. Yashro Mondreu, “Totyoba production systems”, Inst. Of Industrial Engineers, 1983.
3. Shgo Shingo “Simple minute of dies”, productivity press.
12
Reference books:
1. David J Sumanth, “Productivity Engineering & Management”, MGH Benjamin, S
Blanchard “Logistics Engineering Management”, PH, 1974.
2. Elwood, S Buffa “Models for production and Operations Management”, John Wiley &
Sons.
LAB COMPONENT
A. CAM-Programming and Simulation
1. CNC-Turning
2. CNC-Milling
B. FEM- Analysis software’s, linear analysis problems on Bars of constant cross section
area, tapered cross section and stepped bars. Trusses, Beams – cantilever, simply
supported, beams with UDL and UVL loads. Non-Linear Analysis-Stress Analysis of a
Rectangular Plate with a circular hole
Course outcome:
1. The students will have a clear idea of a manufacturing system works and what are the
different variables in a system
2. The student will get a clear idea of how to improve productivity using the most
advanced techniques
3. The student will learn the importance of MRP and how to acquire the material in time.
4. The student will learn the different means of eliminating wastes in manufacturing and
economically plan the production.
5. They will be able to analyze the value of a process or a product and will know exactly
what is value engineering and value analysis and to know what exactly is zero base
budgeting and calculate the value of a product using logistics techniques and life cycle
costing
13
COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN
Course Code : MCIM14
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
Computer aided design is the technology concerned with the use of digital computers to
perform various functions related to design and manufacturing. CAD is an important industrial
art extensively used in many applications, including automotive, shipbuilding, and aerospace
industries, industrial and architectural design, prosthetics, and many more. CAD is also widely
used to produce computer animation for special effects in movies, advertising and technical
manuals. Because of its enormous economic importance, CAD has been a major driving force
for research in computational geometry and computer graphics (both hardware and software),
drafting, simulation, analysis and manufacturing.
Computer aided design technology integrates design and manufacturing, which were earlier
traditionally been treated as distinct and separate functions in production firm.
Experience and wisdom have it that CAD users become very inefficient in using CAD systems
unless they understand the fundamental concepts on which these systems are built. Computer
aided design provides a technology base along with Computer aided manufacturing for the
Computer Integrated Manufacturing or Computer integrated factory of the future.
Course Learning Objectives:
1. To impart the basic need of product cycle, automation, production and Computer aided
design
2. Knowledge enhancement in areas like computer graphics, database structure and
software configuration in CAD systems
3. To enable students to choose appropriate hardware configuration for various CAD
applications, which include operational principles of graphics input systems, output
systems and workstation
4. To make the students to demonstrate/analyze various techniques available to solve
various math based application in transformation of graphical entities
5. To enable students to utilize appropriate features in CAD application thereby enhancing
productivity in design
UNIT – I
Introduction to CAD
Definition, Product cycle and CAD/CAM, Automation & CAD/CAM Computer Graphics and
Database: Introduction, Software configuration of a Graphic system, Functions of graphics
package, Constructing the Geometry, Transformations, Database structure and Content, Wire
frame features and CAD/CAM Integration. Computer Aided Design System Hardware’s:
Introduction, Graphics input devices, Light pens, Analogue devices, Keyboard devices, graphic
display devices, CRT displays, & Plasma panel displays.
UNIT - II
Graphic output devices
Pen plotters, Electrostatic plotters, other graphic output devices, Modes of operation, CAD
System Configuration, Computer Aided System Software: Introduction, Operating system,
Graphics system. The overlay system, Graphics Database structure and Handling, operating
features, Symbols, Macros, Editing facilities, Data Selection, Graphic transformation, Plotting,
Graphic standards- GKS and CORE, GKS-3D and PHIGS, IGES and other graphic standards.
14
UNIT – III
Transformation System
Display, Windowing and Clipping, Two-dimensional transformations, Three-dimensional
transformations, linear transformations, problems on Transformations.
UNIT – IV
Geometric Modeling: Introduction
Dimensions of models, Types of models, Construction of solid models, Wire frame models,
Curve representation. Parametric representation of analytic curves – Review of Vector
Algebra, Lines, Circles, Ellipse, Parabolas, Hyperbolas, Conics. Parametric representation of
Synthetic Curves – Hermite Cubic Splines, Bezier Curves, B-Spline Curves, Rotational
Curves. Curve Segmentation, Trimming, Intersection. Transformation Design and Engineering
Applications – Problems, Surface Models: Introduction – Surface models, Surface Entities,
Surface Representation. Parametric Representation of Analytic Surface – Plane surface, Ruled
Surface, Surface of Revolution, Tabulated Cylinder. Parametric representation of Synthetic
surface, Bezier Surface, B- Spline surface, Coons Surface, Blending surface, Offset surface,
Triangular Patches, Sculptured Surface, Rational Parametric Surface, Surface manipulations –
Displaying, Evaluating points and Curves on Surfaces.
UNIT - V
Segmentation
Trimming, Intersection, Projection, Transformation. Design and Engineering applications
Problems, Mechanical Assembly: Introduction, Assembly modeling – Parts modeling and
Representation, Hierarchical Relationship, Mating Conditions. Inference of position from
mating conditions. Representation schemes – Graph structure Sequences – Precedence
Diagram, Liaison – sequence analysis, Precedence Graph. Assembly Analysis – Problems.
Text books:
1. M P Groover and Zimmer, CAD/CAM Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing,
Prentice hall 2000.
2. CAD/CAM Ravindra A.S Best Publishers 2005.
Reference Books:
1. C B Besant and ewk Lui – Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing, Affiliated East
West, India 1988.
2. Ibrahim Zeid, CAD/CAM Theory and Practice, Tata McGraw Hill 1988.
Course Outcome:
i. Students explain basics of product cycle, automation, production systems and Computer
aided design
ii. Student applies the knowledge of computer graphics , database structure in configuring
CAD related software applications for specific industrial needs
iii. Students implement appropriate hardware for specific CAD projects leading to effective
project solving capabilities in industry related projects
iv. Acquired knowledge related to various techniques to solve math based application in
transformation of graphical entities
v. Implement methods of utilization of appropriate features in CAD application thereby
enhancing productivity in design
15
STATISTICAL MODELLING AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS
Course Code : MMSE 21 / MCIM 21
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 4:1:0
Preamble:
Experimentation is a part of any research work. M.Tech. program requires orientation towards
research, and hence requires knowledge of the various experimental and statistical methods
both for project work, for understanding of literature, and for understanding requirements of
improvement in the processes/products. This course aims at teaching the students some of the
basic aspects of statistical tools like the regression analysis, correlation analysis. The course
aims at having understanding of experiments, the various concepts of experiments, teaching
how to design and analyze experiments. Various designs of experimentation and their analysis
and applications are taught in the subject.
Course Learning Objectives:
1. To understand the need for reduction in the number of experimentation.
2. To learn regression analysis for various kinds of regression analysis viz. linear,
quadratic, logarithmic, curvilinear, multiple regressions. and their interpretation
3. To learn classification of experiments
4. To learn basic aspects of various experimental techniques, and aspects, terms and
terminologies of experimentation.
5. To learn how to conduct analysis of variance in different experimental methods viz. the
CRD, RBD, FD, FFD. TD, Shainin design concepts.
UNIT -1
Statistical modelling and data analysis: Introduction to data collection causes and types of
experimental errors – Fixed errors, random errors. Statistical approximation of missing data.
Introduction to Uncertainty Analysis in engineering measurements.
Self Study component: Basic concepts of statistics, Probability Distributions-Types, suitability,
applications. Statistical tests. Exercises relevant to the topics in the unit taken from journals
UNIT II
Regression and correlation analysis: Linear Regression models – Simple Linear Regression,
method of least squares, estimation of regression coefficients, analysis of variance of LR,
determination of correlation coefficients.
Curvilinear Regression – Logarithm and exponential models, multiple regression analysis –
Simple examples.
Self Study component: Exercises relevant to the topics in the unit taken from journals
UNIT III
Design and analysis of experiments: Introduction, Basic terms, Classification DOE, Basic
principles of good design, Completely Randomized Design, Randomized Block Design, Latin
Square Design, Analysis of variance and co-variance in experimental design.
Self Study component: Exercises relevant to the topics in the unit taken from journals
UNIT IV
Factorial Design: Two factor experiments, multifactor and 2n experiments and their graphical
representation.
Self Study component: Exercises relevant to the topics in the unit taken from journals
16
UNIT V
Fractional Factorial and other designs: Fractional factorial experiments, Taguchi designs.
Introduction to Shainin approach.
Self Study component: Exercises relevant to the topics in the unit taken from journals
Text books:
1. Richard A Johnson, “Probability and statistics for engineers”, 6th Edition, Pearson
education.
2. Phillip J Ross Taguchi “Techniques for quality Engineering 2nd Edition”, Mc GrawHill 1996.
3. J. P. Holman, “Experimental methods for Engineers”, McGraw-Hill International
edition
4. Kekri R Bote & Adi K Bote “World Class Quality”.
Reference Books:
1. Douglas C. Montgomery, “Design and Analysis of Experiments” 5th Edition, John
Wiley and Sons, Inc 2004.
2. Cocran and Cox, “Experimental Designs”, John Wiley & Sons
3. J.M. Juran, Frank M. Gryna, “Juran’s Quality Control Handbook” McGraw-Hill
International Editions 1974.
4. P. K. De, “Computer based numerical methods and statistical techniques” CBS
Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, Time life books, 1985.
Course outcomes: A student,
1. Will be able to understand the need for reduction in number of experiments
2. Will be able to do regression analysis of various kinds, viz. linear, quadratic,
logarithmic, curvilinear, multiple regressions. and will be able to interpret the results.
3. Will know how experiments are classified, and be able to classify the experiments.
4. Will know various experimental techniques and other terms and terminologies in
experimentation, and apply the same in professional practice.
5. Will be able to conduct analysis of various in different experimental methods, viz., the
CRD, RBD, FD, and FFD. , and will be able to understand the basic aspects of Taguchi
and Shainin designs, and thus be able to contribute to improvement in product designs
in industry.
17
ROBOTICS
Course Code : MCIM22
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble
This course provides an overview of robot mechanisms, dynamics, and intelligent controls.
Topics include planar and spatial kinematics, and motion planning; mechanism design for
manipulators and mobile robots, multi-rigid-body dynamics, exposure is given to 3D graphic
simulation; control design, actuators, and sensors; wireless networking, task modeling, humanmachine interface, and embedded software.
Students are exposed to the concept of DH Methods, transformation matrices. A wide scope is
give to the area of Applications where in students understand as to how robotics can be applied
in area of welding machine loading and unloading, die casting, forging, spray painting and
drilling. Various leg configuration are discussed followed by programming sequence, planning,
path planning, obstacle avoidance are discussed.
Course Learning Objectives:
1. The Aim of the course is to provide the students, with an opportunity to conceive
design and implement robotics systems quickly and effectively, using the various
techniques available in robotic technology
2. The students will be exposed to the history of robotics and its stages and developments
in various industries and Processes associated with robotics planning customization,
algorithms, basic transformation are evaluated and its advantages explained
3. The students learn the various applications of robotics in different fields of engineering,
medicine and Selectively choose mobile robots for specific applications
4. Learn how relative improvements can be established by using concept of degree of
steerability, mobility, maneuverability techniques as compared to manual solution
5. The software associated with robotic programming are explained to enable the students
choose specific programs and customized programs for a specific application
UNIT –I
Basic Concepts of Robotics:
Introduction to robotics, Definition of robot, Basic structure of robot, Numerical control of
Machine tools, Resolution, Accuracy and Repeatability, Position representation, Performance
specification: Pay load, Speed. Classifications and Structures of Robotics Systems: Point-topoint and Continuous path systems, Trajectory Planning,
UNIT –II
Physical configurations and work volumes of an Industrial robot
The wrist and its motions, Grippers and types, Kinematic Analysis and Coordinate
Transformations: Direct kinematics problem in Robotics, Euler’s angle representation, Basic
transformations, Rotation about an arbitrary axis, Homogeneous transformation matrices,
Denvit and Hertanberg Convention, Applications of D-H Method- Three axis Robot Arms,
Three axis wrists, Six axis Robot Manipulators.
18
UNIT –III
Industrial Applications of Robots:
Welding Machine loading: Multiple Robot & Multiple Machine loading, Sequential machine
loading, forging and Die Casting. Spray painting and drilling. Assembly: Engine Assembly,
Electrical and Electronics machine assembly, General assembly, Unusual applications: Sheepshearing Robots, Robot in Construction, Autonomous Mobile Robots: Introduction,
Locomotion-key issues for locomotion, Legged Mobile Robots
UNIT –IV
Leg configurations and stability
Wheeled Mobile Robots, Difference between wheeled and legged mobile Robots, Mobile
Robot Kinematics: Introduction, Kinematics Models and Constraints, Representing robot
position, Forward kinematics models, Wheel kinematics constraints, Robot kinematics
constraints. Mobile Robot Maneuverability: Degree of Mobility, Degree of Streeability, Robot
maneuverability.
UNIT –V
Mobile Robot Planning and Navigation
Introduction, Competences for Navigation Planning and Reacting, Path Planning, Obstacle
avoidance, Navigation architectures-Modularity – Modularity code reuse and sharing, Control
localization, Techniques for decomposition. Programming Languages: Introduction, Levels of
Programming Languages, Introduction to VAL, RAIL and AML languages. Example of
programming by VAL II.
Text Books:
1. M P Grover “Industrial Robotics” MGH.
2. Yoren and Koren, “Robotics for Engineers” MGH
3. Robotics and Manufacturing Automation, by C Ray Asfahl, John Wiley and Sons, Inc,
Second edition.
Reference Books:
1. Robotics by Fu and Lee
2. Robotics for Engineers by Philippe Coffet, Volume 01 to 08
3. Walking machines- An introduction to Legged Robots by D J Todd.
Course Outcome:
1. The students can express the concept of developmental stages in robotics
2. The stages of development in robotic technology will help the students to evaluate and
look forward for newer techniques and processes in the factories of future
3. Students can selectively choose various methods that are available in robotics that can
provide
4. Students can selectively increase the mobility and speed of robots for specific application
5. Students can enhance the productivity of robots for specific applications by selecting the
appropriate programming language and techniques
19
FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS
Course Code : MCIM23
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 4:0:1
Preamble:
This subject helps the student to learn about the importance of Flexible Manufacturing system
its configurations and different types of FMS layouts available for different industries. Also the
subject helps the student also to use multi-disciplinary subjects like DNC and the use of FMS
host computer for interfacing Machineries, Material handling systems, Retrieval systems.
Sequence the same and schedule the systems. Finally the subject helps to understand and
interpret technically and economically the use of FMS.
Course Learning Objectives:
1. To make student understand the need for flexibility in manufacturing industries
2. To know the differences between conventional and flexible manufacturing systems
3. To learn the functions of FMS host computer its area control function distribution using
DNC, FMS Layouts and simulation
4. To learn the different types of automated material handling systems its design and
calculations for different applications both AS/RS
5. To learn the different types of interfacing of material handling systems, storage systems
with manufacturing modeling and analysis of FMS.
6. To learn the different types of sequencing and scheduling methods with problems
7. To know the economical and technological justification for FMS using GT, JIT and
typical case studies.
UNIT –I
FMS-An overview
Definition of FMS- Types and configurations concepts – types of flexibility and performance
measures. Function of FMS host computer – FMS host and area controller function
distribution, Development and implementation of an FMS: Planning phase – integration –
system configuration – FMS layouts – Simulation – FMS project development steps. Project
management – equipment development – host system development – planning – hardware and
software development.
UNIT –II
Automated material handling and storage
Functions – types – analysis of material handling equipments, design of conveyor and AGV
systems, Problems, Automated storages: Storage system performance, AS/RS Carousel storage
system. WIP storage system interfacing handling storage with manufacturing
UNIT –III
Modelling and analysis of FMS: Analytical, heuristics, queuing simulation and petrinet
modelling techniques-scope applicability and limitations.
Concepts of distributed numerical control
DNC system – communication between DNC computer & machine control unit – Hierarchical
processing of date in DNC system – Features of DNC systems.
UNIT –IV
Scheduling and loading of FMS: Introduction – Scheduling of operations on a single machine –
2 machine flows hop scheduling – 2 machine job shop scheduling, 3 machine flow shop
scheduling – scheduling ‘n’operations on ‘m’ machines loading problems. Scheduling rules
20
UNIT –V
Tool management of FMS – material handling system schedule. Problems, Inspection and
cleaning stations. CMM, sequence of operations, advantages types of CMM problems. FMS
relational: Economic and technological justification for FMS – as GT, JIT – operation and
evaluation – personnel and infrastructural aspects – typical case studies – future prospects
Text books:
1.
Parrish D J, Flexible manufacturing, Butterworth – Heinemann, Ltd Oxford, 1993
2.
Groover M P, Automation, production system and computer integrated manufacturing,
PHI, 1989
3.
Kusiak A, Intelligent Manufacturing systems, prentice hall, Englewood Clitts, NJ, 1990
4.
William W Luggen – Flexible Manufacturing Cells and systems, PH, NJ
Reference Books:
1. Considine D M and Considine G D, Standard handbook of industrial automation,
Chupman and Hall, London, 1986
2. Vishwanatham N and Narahari Y, peroformance modeling of automated manufacturing
Systems, PHI, 1992
3. Ranky P G, The design and operation of FMS, IFS publication, UK, 1988
4. Dr. H K Shivanand, “Flexible Manufacturing System” – Dhanpat Rai Publication,
New Delhi.
References:
1. CAD Manual- M S Ramaiah Institute of Technology, 2007
2. Metal Forming: Processes and Analysis by Betzalel Avitzure, TMH, Edition 1977.
3. Deforma 3D Manual, DEFORM.2007
Lab Component:
Advanced Manufacturing /CIM Laboratory (CIM & MSE)
Introduction:
1. 6-Axes Robot Programming
2. PLC-Hydraulic kit
3. PLC-Pneumatic kit
Course outcome:
1. The student will get a clear idea of FMS, atomizing an conventional industry
2. The student will learn the different types of FMS layouts and will be able to simulate
the system
3. The student will learn to design the material handling and retrieval systems using
analytical methods for various applications
4. They will be able to synchronize the machineries with material handling and retrieval
systems
5. They will be finally able to economically and technically justify the application of
FMS.
21
COMPUTER CONTROL OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS
Subject Code: MCIM-E01
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
The declining cost of microcomputers change the look of factory floor. Modern manufacturing
systems and industrial robots are advanced automation systems that utilize computers as an
integral part of their control. Computers are vital part of automation. There is increase in case
of computer controlled machine tools in the production line. Numerical controlled (NC)
machine tools are more accurate than conventional machine tools, which can reduce all non
automating machining time, apply fast tool changing method and idle motions by increasing
the rapid traverse velocities.
Numerical controlled (NC) machines and Computer Numerical controlled (CNC) machines
employ control circuits, which include counters, decoders, DAC converters etc.,. Computer
Control of Manufacturing Systems employs closed loop controllers that measure state of
system during operation and decrease effects of load disturbances and compensate in real time
for parameter variation. To improve production rate or reduce machining cost adaptive control
is used to automatically set the optimal operating parameters subject to machining constraints
in order to optimize the performance of overall system. The supervision of flexible
manufacturing system is performed by computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems in
which production flow from the conceptual design through the finished products will be
entirely under computer control and management.
Course Learning Objectives:
1. To impart the basic concepts in manufacturing systems and fundamentals of NC &
CNC system
2. To enhance students awareness in system devices that include feedback devices,
counters, DAC converters and interpolators
3. To make the students perform /analyze manual part programming , computer aided
programming and APT programming
4. To impart concepts of CNC systems and utilization of microprocessors in CNC systems
to replace the hardware part
5. To impart concepts of adaptive control to improve the production rate and reduce
machining cost by calculation and setting of optimal operating parameters during
machining
UNIT –I
Introduction
Fundamentals of numerical control, advantages limitations of N.C systems-classification of
N.C systems. Features of N.C. Machine tools: design consideration of N.C machine tools
9 Hrs
UNIT –II
Increasing productivity with N.C machines
Machining centre, tooling for CNC machine. System device: device, feedback devicescounting devices digital to analog converters
9 Hrs
22
UNIT –III
Interpolations
DDA integrators, simple and symmetrical DD reference word CNC interpolators. N.C part
programming: Introduction-punched tape-manual part programming computer aided
programming, APT programming.
9 Hrs
UNIT –IV
Control loops for N C Systems
Introduction-control loops for point and contouring systems.
9 Hrs
UNIT –V
Computerized numerical control:
CNC concepts-advantage of CNC references pale techniques, Sampled data techniques
microcomputers in CNC, Adaptive control systems: adaptive control with optimization
Adaptive control with constraints-variable gains AC systems.
9 Hrs
Text Books:
1. Martin J. Numerical control of machine tools
2. Yoram .Koren “Computer Controls of Manufacturing Systems” McGrawHill 1983
Reference Books:
1. Y.koren & J.Benuri “Numerical control of machine tools”, Khanna Pub 2005.
2. Wilson F.M “Numerical control in manufacturing” Mc Graw Hill Newyor.
3. Robot Technology Fundamental by James.G.Keramas, Denmark Pub 1985.
Course Outcome:
1. Students can explain basic concepts of manufacturing systems and
fundamentals of
NC & CNC systems
2. Students can implement appropriate system for specific machine tools
3. Students can demonstrate/analyze manual part programming , computer aided
programming and APT programming
4. Acquired knowledge in concepts of CNC systems and utilization of microprocessors in
CNC systems to replace the hardware part
5. Student applies knowledge of adaptive control to improve the production rate and
reduce machining cost by calculation and setting of optimal operating parameters
during machining
23
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS)
Subject Code: MCIM-E02
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4: 0: 0
Preamble:
Management Information system(MIS) is gaining importance in the present day as almost all
engineering activities are taken up on fast track basis as well as decision making with the
available information has to be done in the most optimum time for any task. This is enabled
only by providing the necessary access to the Engineer the right information at the right time
and providing in the way it is required. This is being achieved using high speed computers
which provide the data storage, data reduction, value addition for the data, data acquisition,
retrieval and data warehousing for effective management functions The subject provides the
basic fundamental approaches for effective data management. The subject also encompasses
the practical aspects with the right information converted to measurable parameter, particularly
in project management activities.
This course acts as a bridge between the Technical and Managerial functionaries with special
emphasis on the utilization of high speed computers which drastically provides all the
necessities towards effective and pragmatic decision making process for all business
operations. The subject enables the engineer to integrate easily with any type of industry with
minimum uptime for getting into the jobs/tasks assigned without looking for long le orientation
programmes and ensures the base required for analysis and continuous improvement targets..
Course Learning Objectives:
1. Introduce the various aspects of MIS as applied to engineering problems in a
systematic manner.
2. Apply the fundamental concepts of mathematical methods and effective utilization of
the tools- high speed computers, software packages, towards decision making
processes..
3. Define the fundamental processes and procedures for management of data resources
and exposure to the business and enterprise applications.
4. Provide an overview of security and ethical challenges, global value chain and Ebusiness technology.
5. Develop methods of working of commercial software packages required for number
crunching and access to on-line information offices. Using the state-of-art Information
technology
UNIT –I
Introduction: Definition, importance, evolution, computers and MIS organizational structures,
logical foundation, future of MIS, Organizational systems: Nature and characteristics of
organizations
UNIT –II
Information systems and organizations: Organizational and information system structures,
information, data information, management and information systems. Information support for
functional areas, impact of business and information systems
24
UNIT –III
Organizing information systems, absorption of MIS in organizations, Communication
technology: Telecommunications, computer networking
UNIT –IV
Database technology: Database and enterprise management, file processing systems and
database systems, database approach and its architecture, DBMS, Models, RDBMS, SQL,
4GL, data administration, current development in databases, Decision support systems; DSS
issues, Structure constructions-approaches, generators,
UNIT –V
Tools, software and cost benefits and simple examples of applications, Expert systems: Basic
concepts, structure development, benefits and limitations, Computer and information system:
evolution of computer hardware and software
Text books:
1. L S Sadagopan “Management Information Systems” PHI, 1997, Reference books:
2. Davis
G
B
and
M.olson
“Management
Information
Systems”,
McGraw Hill New York, 1985
3. O’brien J A Jr., “Management Information System” Mc Millan, NY, 1995
Reference Books:
1. Date C J, “An introduction to database systems” 6th Edition, Volume-I, Addison
Wesley, 1995]Turban E and Meredith J R, “Fundamental of Management science”,
IRWIN inc 1991
2. Murdick R G and Ross, J E “Information systems for modern management” PHI,2000
Course Outcomes:
1. Develop utilization of understanding of fundamentals of the MIS and be able to
compare it with other approaches.
2. Be able to identify a problem and apply the fundamental concepts and enable
conversion to computer aided softwares for effective assistance in decision making
process in optimum time..
3. Demonstrate the ability to define and formulate the properties and characteristics of
data base management by any engineer.
4. Develop the skills of effective utilization of the tools of management on electronic base
for better productivity.
5. Become competent to design and analyze problems of engineering particularly having
relevance to manufacturing and of current techniques and technologies and demonstrate
ability to make use of commercial software to solve complex problems.
25
TOOLING FOR MANUFACTURING IN AUTOMATION
Subject Code: MCIM-E03
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
Rapid developments are taking place in the field of manufacturing processes, the exotic
and complicated machinery and new products are appearing in the market. Tool design is
a specializes area of manufacturing engineering which comprises the analysis, planning,
design, and the application of tools, methods and the procedures to increase the
manufacturing productivity. For this, a tool designer has to have a working knowledge of
machine shop practice, tool making procedures, machine tool design, etc. Tooling refers
to the hardware necessary to produce a particular product. Tooling as viewed by the tool
designer consists of a vast array of cutting tools, devices, jigs, fixtures, dies, gauges for
measurement etc., used for manual production with the development of new materials,
need for higher dimensional accuracy, high production rate, a need for development of
individual requirements with respect to tooling arose. This has resulted in various new
techniques and replacement of the conventional fixtures, clamping devices etc.
Course learning Objectives:
1. The students are introduced to the need for pre-design analysis, fixtures and jigs,
principles for locating, positioning, clamping.
2. To evaluate and analyze the differences between the conventional technologies and NC
machine tools.
3. To understand the sheet metal fabrication methods and understand the concept of
simple dies, compound dies and progressive dies.
4. To understand the injection moulding methods
5. To understand the different gating systems, runner and gating design, the concept of
ejection, cooling systems, types, shrink analysis and analyze the fluid flow in moulds.
Unit-I
Design of Jigs & Fixtures: Pre-design analysis, fixture design procedure principles of
locating and positioning, clamping and positioning, tooling for drilling and reaming
processes. Milling fixture design, fixture for twining, boring & grinding.
Unit-II
Tooling for Numeral Control Machine Tool: Special design considerations, modular
fixture design, modular tooling system. Other NC tooling. Tooling for Flexible
manufacturing systems.
Unit-III
Design of Tools for sheet metal operations: Design of sample, compound and progressive
dies, Design of strip layout. Die materials, press selection, Die design for sheet metal
forming, cutting and SMED principles.
Unit-IV
Design of Thermoplastic Injection Mould Design: Product and mould, fluid flow,
machine and its influence on mould design. Two plates and Three plate moulds. Runner
and gate design. Runner less and undercut moulds. Mould cooling. Ejection methods,
Prototype moulds. Mould Tool materials.
Unit-V
26
Part and Mould Design Optimization: Part and mould design, simulation-static, dynamic
and thermal analysis of thermoplastic parts and injection moulds. Analysis of Thermo
Plastic and Rubber Moulds: Cool, wrap, shrink analysis, locating of weld lines. Mould
materials.
Reference books:
1. William E Boyes, “Handbook of Jig and Fixture Design”, Second Edition, SME,
Michigan, 1989.
2. Cracknell P S and Dysor R W, “Handbook of Thermoplastic Injection Mould Design”,
Blackie Academic & Professional, Glasgow, 1993.
3. SME, “Tool and Manufacturing Engineers Hand Book”, Vol.II-Forming Fourth
Edition, 1984.
4. Nagpal, “Tool design”
5. P H Joshi, “Jigs & Fixtures”, TMH Publications.
Course Outcomes:
1. They will be able to adopt new techniques and identify various components of jigs and
fixture.
2. They will have clear ideas about the technological advancement in manufacturing using
numerical control machines
3. The will be able to adopt the concept and applications of dies in sheet metal fabrication.
4. The will be able to adopt the concept and applications of dies in injection moulding for
plastic component manufacturing.
5. The will be able to identify and understand the various mould defects and will get a
basic knowledge on mould flow analysis.
27
CONDITION BASED MAINTENANCE (CBM)
Course Code: MCIM-E04
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble
Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) is continually evolving its conceptual basis which can be
traced back to the earliest development of machinery, and the use of human senses to monitor
the state of Industrial equipment. In today’s industry augmented by scientific and sophisticated
instrumentation. CBM is widely employed in sophisticated instrumentation allows the
quantification of the health or condition of industrial machinery and equipment, so that
problems can be diagnosed early in their development and corrected by suitable maintenance,
before they become serious enough to cause failure and plant breakdown.
Course learning Objectives:
1. To make a student understand the concept of Maintenance and condition based
maintenance, types, their principles, economics and applications.
2. To know the implementation of different types of monitoring techniques applicable to
various manufacturing systems. general NDT application and specialized techniques
used in CBM and their importance in modern plants
3. To learn about the NDT methods like Radiographic examination and Ultrasonic
examination used to improve the availability, maintainability of the modern plant for
optimal running condition.
4. The student is able to understand the concepts of Acoustic emission examination,
Thermography techniques used in CBM and various other methods and Instrumentation
used in these techniques.
5. Learn and understand the concept of advanced monitoring and analysis techniques like
Vibration monitoring, Corrosion monitoring, Wear monitoring and Lubricant
monitoring and analysis.
UNIT –I
Condition Based Maintenance
Introduction, Principles, Economics and Application; Condition Monitoring Methods.
Economics of Condition Monitoring, Setting up a CM Activity, Implementation of Condition
Based Maintenance, Consequences of implementation of CBM. Information System, Selection
of Monitoring Methods, Assessment of monitoring techniques, Case studies, Non-Destructive
testing and specialized techniques: Introduction, Visual testing, Liquid Penetrate inspection,
Water-washable method. Precleaning, Penetrant application, Dwell time,
UNIT –II
Excess surface-penetrate removal
Surface drying, Developer application, Interpretation, Post-emulsifiable penetrants, SolventSoluble penetrants, Radiographic examination: X-ray Apparatus, X-ray generation, Tube
shielding, Control console, Other Xray sources, Electrostatic or Ven De Graffgenerators,
28
Linear accelerators. Gamma-ray Radiography-Sources-Radium, Thallium 170, Iridium 192,
Cobalt 62. Isotope Projectors-Geometric factors,Radiographic film, Radiograph. Safety
Hazards and Government control; Cost
UNIT –III
Ultrasonic’s Examination
Pulse echo technique, Transmission technique, Resonance technique, Frequency modulation
techniques.Acoustic imaging, Ultra sonic triangulation fault location Acoustic emission
technique (AET)-Instrumentation, Transducers, Preamplifier and filter, Main amplifier and
Signal processing/ Display unit, Signals and processing, Magnetic testing Methods, Current
flow Magnetisation, Induction Magnetic Flow Method, Induction Threading bar method,
Induction Magnetising Coil method, Induced Current flow method, Magnetic particle
Inspection Inks, Strippable Magnetic film, Eddy Current apparatus, Cost. ThermographyThermographic Equipment, Application of Thermography Performance Trend monitoring:
Introduction, Thermodynamic and Fluid dynamic analysis, Primary and Secondary,
performance parameter, Steam turbine performance parameters, Case examples.
UNIT –IV
Vibration Monitoring and analysis:
Introduction, Machinery signatures, Selection of Transducers. Analysis Techniques, Machine
failure modes, Measurement location, Vibration severity criteria, Vibration frequency analysis.
Permanent Monitoring, Case studies. Mechanical fault diagnosis by wears monitoring &
lubricant analysis: Introduction, Source of Contamination, Significant oil contaminants, used
oil Contamination-time trends, Changes in the carrier fluid, Ferratic wear debris.
UNIT –V
Wear process monitoring techniques
Direct debris detection methods, Debris collection methods. Lubricant sampling & analysisSampling, Lubricant sampling methods, Lubricant analysis methods, Interpretation of results,
Indications from the amount of debris present, Indication from the size distribution of debris,
Application of chemical analysis of debris, Wear detection using proximity monitors, Case
examples. Condition Monitoring case Studies & Applications: Failure of fan bearings- History
of failures, Analysis of the failures, Solution. High frequency vibration of gas compressorHistory of trouble, Analysis of trouble, Solution. Monitoring of cracks in rotorsTurbocompressor misalignment. Detection of faulty electrical components, turbine shell
distortion, symptoms and Detections
Text books:
1. R. A., Caollacatt Chapman “Mechanical Fault Diagnosis and Condition
Monitoring”,
Chapman and hall 1977.
2. L. F. Pau Marcel Deker “Failure Diagnosis and Performance Monitoring”.
References Books:
1.Update CEP ISTE New Delhi “Condition Monitoring and condition based maintenance”.
2. Current Literature. Crosbie Michael J, Brikhasur pub,2005
29
Course Outcomes:
1. Students are able to demonstrate concept of Maintenance and condition based
maintenance, types, their principle, economics and application.
2. Able to implement different types of monitoring techniques applicable to various
manufacturing systems with their advantages and limitations .Students are capable to
take decision to implementation of monitoring techniques on shop floor depending on
the types of industries.
3. Students introduced to the advanced NDT methods like Radiographic examination and
Ultrasonic examination used to improve the availability, maintainability of the modern
plant for optimal running condition.
4. The concept of Ultrasonic application ,Acoustic emission examination ,Thermography
techniques used in condition Monitoring and various Instrumentation used in these
techniques by visual observation by plant visits are demonstrated
5. Concept of advanced monitoring and analysis techniques like Vibration monitoring,
Corrosion monitoring, Wear monitoring and Lubricant monitoring and analysis are
demonstrated to students through Industrial visits.
30
ADVANCED TOPICS IN MANUFACTURING
Course Code: MCIM-E05
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble
Advanced Topics in Manufacturing is a new domain featuring tools and techniques that help
manufacturers gain productivity and enable constant monitoring mechanisms helping industry
focus on reduced lead time and enhanced work rejection rates. Areas such as just in time
production is discussed with use of software packages making production system move to the
next level. Quality control and its methods enable companies to ensure quality products reach
market and various techniques available to enhance the checking process thereby enabling the
overall quality process.
Course learning Objectives:
1 To make a student understand the concept of JIT, types, their principles, economics and
applications.
2 To know the implementation and production of different types of JIT for manufacturing
systems. Also understand the process of Scheduling and Sequencing.
3 To learn about the sequential withdrawal system
4 The student is able to understand the concepts of Kanban system implemented in
Toyota
5 Learn and understand the concept of production planning, production smooting and
demand fluctuation
UNIT –I
Introduction and need of CPC
What CPC can do, CPC – getting the right tool JIT – Introduction – The spread of JIT
Movement, some definitions of JIT, core Japanese practices of JIT, Creating continuous Flow
Manufacturing, Enabling JIT to occur, Basics elements of JIT, Benefits of JIT
UNIT –II
Just in Time
Primary purpose., profit through cost reduction, Elimination of over production, quality
control, Quality Assurance, Respect for Humanity, Flexible work force, JIT, Production
Adapting to changing production Quantities, purpose layout for shortened lead times,
standardization of operation, Sequencing and scheduling used by suppliers – Monthly and daily
information.
UNIT –III
Sequenced withdrawal systems
By sequenced schedule table problems and counter measure in applying the kanban systems to
sub contractors.
Toyota Production Systems – The philosophy of TPS, Basics Frames
Work of TPS, kanbans. Determine the Number of Kanbans in Toyota Production systems.
A) Kanban Number under constant Quality withdrawal systems
B) Constant Cycle, Non constant Quality Withdrawal Systems
C) Constant Withdrawal Cycle System for the Supplier Kanban
D) Examples A Detailed Kanban Systems Examples
Supplier Kanban and the sequencing Scheduled for the USE by Supplier
1) Later replenishment systems by Kanban
2) Sequenced Withdrawal systems
31
3) Circulation of the Supplier Kanban within Toyota
Production Smoothing in TPS, Production Planning, Production Smoothing, Adaptability to
Demand fluctuation, Sequencing Method for the Mixed Model Assembly Line to Realize
Smoothed Production
UNIT –IV
JUST IN TIME Production
With Total Quality Control – Just in Time Concept, cutting purchase order cost the JIT cause –
effect chain, scrape / Quality Improvement, Motivation effects responsibility effects, small
group improvement activities withdrawal of buffer inventory The total quality control concept,
The Quality Control Introduction – TQC concept, responsibility, learning from the west, TQC
concepts, categorized, goals, habit of improvement, perfection, basics process control, easy to
see quality control as facilitator, small lot size, house keeping. Less than full capacity
scheduling, daily machine checking.
UNIT –V
Techniques and tool
Exposure to problems, fool proof devices, tools of analysis QC circles, TQC in Japanese
owned US Electronics plant TQC in Japanese owned Automotive plants. Plant configuration:
Introduction ultimate plant configuration Job shop fabrication frame welding forming frames
parts from tubing Dedicated production lines, overlapped production, the daily schedule,
forward linkage by means of kanban, physical merger of process, Adjacency, mixed models
automated production lines, Pseudo Robots, Robots, CAD and Manufacturing, Conveyors and
stacker cranes, Automatic Quality Monitoring.
Text Books:
1. Toyota Production system – An integrated approach to just in time – by
Yasuhiro Monden
2. Lean Thinking – Byjames Wornack
3. The machine that changed the world – The story of lean production – By James
P WornackHarper Perennial Edition Published 1991
Reference Books:
1. Japanese Manufacturing Techniques – By Richard Schonberger
2. Just in Time Manufacturing – Kargoanker
3. Wind chill reference manual Oxford university press,2005
Course learning Outcomes:
1. Students can demonstrate the concept of JIT their types, principles and application
through real time examples
2. Students can assess types of JIT for different manufacturing system making scheduling
and sequencing an easy process
3. Demonstrate sequential withdrawal system through real time examples
4. Awareness of how Kanban is implemented in Toyota is enlightened to all users.
5. Students can distinguish between various chain initiative production planning and
demand fluctuation
32
REVERSE ENGINEERING
Subject Code: MCIM-E06
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
With change in technology different approaches of making Re design of the products whose
dimensions are unknown. There are continuous studies on improvement of the various methods
for determining the dimensions with various scanning techniques, light imaging technique.
There are some standard Benchmark systems for preparing the dimensions such as rapid
prototyping. And also there is a need to improve the methods of making human life more
comfort. This course deals with the study of such advanced methods of reverse engineering to
serve the required purpose.
Course Learning Objectives:
1. Students are initially made to know the concept of the various scanners and its
applications.
2. Students will have the knowledge to study various methods of light range imaging.
3. To analyze various Reverse Engineering Hardware and Software.
4. To obtain brief description of various techniques of Reverse Engineering Selection
System.
5. The students will have the knowledge of rapid prototyping and its various techniques
involved.
Unit – I
Introduction: Fundamentals of RE, Generic Process, Phase - 1: Scanning, contact scanner and
non contact scanner, Phase- 2: Point Processing, Phase - 3: Application of Geometric Model
Development, Technique for RE: Potential use of 3D laser scanner, Computer Aided Reverse
Engineering, Computer Aided Forward Engineering, Comparisons. Coordinate measuring
machine, Active Illumination 3-D Stereo, Benefits and Drawbacks. Structure Light Range
Imaging: Source Illumination Categories, sheet- of - light Range Imaging, Scanner pipe line Data collection, Mesh Reconstruction, Surface Fitting.
Unit – II
RE Hardware and Software: RE Hardware- Contact, Non Contact & Destructive Methods, RE
Software - Classification, different Phase & Engineering Equipment.
Unit III
RE Selection System:
Selection Process, team formation, Business and technical
requirements, vendor assessment, benchmarking perform commercial evaluation. Capture
devices, contact device, touch trigger continuous analogue scanning probe. Triangulation
approach, time of flight, structured - light and stereoscopic Imaging system, Light based
approach. Tracking and Internal Measurement System: Accuracy issues, post processing
captured data, handling point, curve and surface creation, inspection application
33
Unit IV
Rapid prototyping: Basic process, current techniques and materials, stereo lithography,
selective laser sintering, Fused Deposition Modelling, Three Dimensional Printing, Laminated
Object Manufacturing, Multijet Modelling, Laser Engineering Net shaping Application. RE
vs RP :Modelling cloud data in reverse engineering, data processing in rapid prototyping,
integrating RE and RP in layer based model generation, adaptive slicing approach for cloud
data modeling. curve construction process, adaptive layer thickness.
Unit V
Application : RE in Automotive Industry, work flow for Automotive body design, RE in
Aerospace Industry, Reducing the cost of hard Tooling, Digitizing NASA Space Vehicle, RE
in Medical Device Industry, case Studies, RE of Hearing instruments, dentistry, knee
replacement technique, orthodontics etc..
Reference Books:
1. Reverse Engineering: An Industrial Perspective by Vinesh Raja, Kiran J. Fernandes,
Springer: 1 Edition ( December 2007).
2. Paul F. Jacobs: "Stereo Lithography and other RP&M Technology" SME, NY, 1996.
Course Learning Outcomes:
1. Students are capable to define the concept of Various scanners techniques and its
applications.
2. Students are capable and they can study various methods of light range imaging.
3. Students are capable to analyze various Reverse Engineering Hardware and Software.
4. Students are capable to brief describe various techniques of Reverse Engineering
Selection System.
5. Students will have the knowledge of rapid prototyping and its various techniques
involved.
34
AUTOMATION IN MANUFACTURING
Course Code: MCIM-E07
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
Automation technology such as robotics, machine tools, handling systems, controllers and
computers are the basis of almost all important industries in the world and provide
manufacturing industry with the means to improve quality, reduce errors, increase productivity
and reduce cycle times. Manufacturing has had a long history, ranging from the initial creation
of simple, hand-crafted items, to the development of large complex factories that include a host
of factory-related production and fabrication techniques. The study of the systems of
manufacturing and production has evolved into a complex field of research in its own right.
Manufacturing and production in the contemporary world faces many challenges
This Course is designed to emphasize the knowledge on the quality improvement,
automation, and advanced manufacturing techniques and impart the student with knowledge of
concepts and techniques, which have recently been applied in many practical situations. It
gives a framework of knowledge that allows the students to develop an interdisciplinary
understanding and integrated approach to overcome the challenges of automation in
manufacturing.
Course Learning Objective:
1. The aim of the course is to define the concept of Automation and Building blocks,
Fundamentals of Manufacturing.
2. To enable student to understand components of automated production, methods and types
of transfer mechanism deployment of storage buffers in automated production line
3. To explain the concept of partial automation, automated assembly system and line
balancing
4. To enable a student to develop ladder logic diagrams and PLC programming for industrial
automation applications.
5. To enable the student to understand the concept of on line computer control of industrial
automated processes
UNIT –I
Automation and Building Blocks:
Automation, Reasons for Automation, Basic Elements of Automated system, advanced
automation functions, Levels of automation, Automation Strategies, Production concept and
Mathematical Models, Functions of Manufacturing.
UNIT –II
Detroit-type Automation:
Methods of transport, Transfer Mechanisms, Buffer storage, Automation for machining
operations, Design and Fabrication considerations, Automated Flow lines, Analysis of
automated Flow Lines with and without buffers
35
UNIT –III
Partial automation, analysis of assembly lines and line balancing
Partial automation, assembly systems, manual and automated assembly lines, analysis of
multistage assembly lines, line balancing problems, methods of line balancing
UNIT –IV
Logic Diagrams:
Logic networks, Ladder Logic Diagrams, Timers, Response diagram. Programmable Logic
Controllers: Introduction, PLC cycle, PLC internal features, PLC programming
UNIT –V
Application programs,
Advantages and Disadvantages of PLCs, On line Computer Control: Process control
computers, Levels of implementations, Control strategies, Process interface, Interrupters,
Process Computer Programming.
Text Books:
1. Performance Modeling of Automated Manufacturing Systems By Vishwanadhan. PHI.
2. Principles and applications of PLC, by Webb, McMillan 1992.
3. Automation, Production systems and CIM by Mikell P Grover, Person Education, Asia
Reference Books:
1. Robotics and Manufacturing Automation, by C Ray Asfahl, John Wiley and Sons,
Inc, Second edition.
2. Principles of CIM by Vajpayee, PHI.
Course Outcome:
1. Students will be able to evaluate the Manufacturing Lead Time (MLT), Production Rate,
Plant capacity by applying the concepts of automated production.
2. Students will be able to involve in the design of transfer mechanisms required for work part
transfer in manufacturing sector and exposed to the deployment of buffer storage
mechanisms that are used in automated production line.
3. Students will be able to implement partial automation, automated assembly system and the
concept of Line balancing
4. Students will be able to develop ladder logic diagrams and PLC programming for industrial
automation applications.
5. Students will be able to implement the concept of on line computer control of industrial
automated processes
36
MACHINE TOOL DYNAMICS
Course Code: MCIM-E08
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
Modern machine tool engineers face greater challenges in designing of machine tools due to
requirements of good surface finish and accuracies of micron and sub micron levels. at least
cost and time. Vibrations and damping, their measurements and management methods and the
other aspects of dynamics while a machine tool is put on work is very much essential to be
understood by all engineers, whether designers or planners. In this context this subject is
important for CIM post-graduates.
Course Learning Objective:
1. Understanding of the damping systems and the types of vibrations
2. Understanding transmissiblity of vibration and its isolation
3. Learning about theories association with vibrations
4. Learning the basics of structural aspects in machine tools
5. To learn about the chatter in machine tools and To understand the theory and
acceptance strategies with reference to chatter in machine tools
UNIT –I
General vibrations theory:
Review of systems with one and two degree of freedom; damped, undamped, free and forced
vibrations, Beat phenomenon; transmissibility of vibration and vibration isolation
UNIT –II
Theory of vibration isolation
Theory of vibration measurement; torsional vibration; Holzer method, Dynamic of structures:
Force and stiffness method. Eigen value problem using lumped mass technique, application to
simple structure with low damping
UNIT –III
Chatter in machine tools:
Basic pattern of chatter in metal cutting; regenerative chatter; mode coupling, Limit width of
cut; importance of negative real component of reacceptance
UNIT –IV
Dynamic cutting force coefficient;
Prediction of machine tool instability, Study of chatter behaviour in lathe; drilling and milling
machines
UNIT –V
CIR Rig.
Damping in machine tools: Material and system damping, Dynamic, impact and active type
dampers; methods of damping improvement in machine tools.
Text Books:
1. F. Koeningberger and J. Tlusty, “Machine Tool Structures”, Pergamon press, 197
2. G. Sweeny, “Vibration of Machine Tools”, Machinery Publishing Col., 1971
37
Reference Books:
1. D. B. Welbourne and J. D. Smith, “Machine Tool Dynamics: An Introduction”
Course outcomes:
At the end of the course the student
1. Will able to understand damping systems and the types of vibrations
2. Will able to understand transmissibility of vibration and its isolation
3. Would have learnt about theories associated with vibrations
4. Would have Learnt the basics of structural aspects in machine tools
5. Will know aspects about the chatter in machine tools
38
SIMULATION AND MODELING OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS
Course Code: MCIM E09
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
Simulation is the method of generating the actual process in virtual environment. This involves
generating mathematical models to simulate the manufacturing systems. Simulation helps to reduce the
experimentation costs and time. The advanced software’s like ARENA, PROMODEL etc help to
identify and solve the minute problems in the systems. It provides the user with the approximate results
in optimum time. Simulation can solve wide range of problems ranging from simple queuing to
complicated problem s like crash analysis.
Course learning Objectives:
1. The students are introduced to the need for simulation and modeling in manufacturing sectors.
2. To analyze the problems related to inventory, queuing, scheduling etc
3. The students will be introduced about generating virtual system and its environment.
4. To gain knowledge about verification and validation of the simulation packages
UNIT – I
Principle of Computer Modeling and Simulation:
Monte Carlo simulation. Nature of computer- modeling and simulation, Limitations of simulation, areas
of applications, System and Environment: Components of a system - discrete and continuous systems.
UNIT – II
Models of system:
A variety of modeling approaches. Discrete Event Simulation: Concepts in discrete event simulation,
manual simulation using event scheduling, single channel queue, too server queue, simulation of
inventory problem.
UNIT - III
Random Number Generation:
Techniques for generating random numbers- Linear congruential method combined linear congruential
method, Random Numbers streams. Tests for random numbers –Frequency Test- KolmogorovSmirnov, Chi Square Test, Tests for Autocorrelation.
UNIT - IV
Random-Variate Generation:
Inversion transforms technique-exponential distribution. Uniform distribution, weibul distribution,
Empirical Continuous Distributions, Empirical Discrete Distributions. Acceptance – Rejection
Technique – Poisson Distribution, Gamma Distribution
UNIT V
Verification and Validation of simulation models:
Model-Building, Verification and Validation, Verification of Simulation Models, Calibration and
Validation of Models- Face Validity, Validation of Model Assumptions, Validating input output
Transformation SIMULATION SOFTWARE: Selection of simulation software, simulation packages.
39
Text books:
1. Jerry Banks & John S Carson II, "Discrete Event System Simulation". Prentice Hall Inc. 1984.
2. Gordan. G. "Systems Simulation", Prentice Hall India Ltd, 1991.
3. Nusing Deo, "System Simulation with Digital Computer", Prentice Hall of India 1979.
Reference Books:
1.Francis Neelamkovil, "Computer Simulation and Modeling", John Wilely & Sons,1987. 2.Rath M.
Davis & Robert M O Keefe, "Simulation Modeling with Pascal'. Prentice Hall
Course learning Outcomes:
1. They will be able to adopt their ideas or apply appropriate simulation tools to generate all types
of factory environments.
2. The students will be familiar with the different modelling of the systems including various
discrete distribution methods.
3. The students will have clear idea about the different kinds of statistical simulation modeling.
4. The students can organize innovative ideas to overcome difficulties facing by the
industry using simulation and modeling in the manufacturing systems.
40
SENSORS APPLICATIONS IN MANUFACTURING
Course Code: MCIM-E10
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4: 0: 0
Preamble:
The major success of the manufacturing strategy is largely credited to the success of
implementing the advanced technology of sensory and control system. Sensors are small
devices designed to sense and measure an object’s physical characteristics such as size, speed,
acceleration, colour, temperature, pressure, volume, viscosity, etc. Advanced sensor and
control technology has been implemented to achieve the qualitative and quantitative goals.
Sensors play an important role in the survival and growth of innovative industries. Today’s
sensors and control systems have expanded beyond their traditional production base into farranging commercial ventures. Sensor technologies entail changing the mind-set of people in
the organization and managing the change. Sensors role in information and control of
operations to maintain an error-free production environment will help enterprises to stay
effective on the competitive course.
Course learning Objectives:
The students are introduced to the need for sensors in manufacturing Industries.
1. To analyze the need for applications and advancements with the use of sensors and
Control systems.
2. To analyze the concept of advanced sensor technology consisting of the newer
technologies and components used for identification of manufacturing components, like
bar code, transponders, color sensing, etc.
3. To apply the advanced techniques of sensors in flexible manufacturing system, such as
image transformation, robot visual sensing tasks, detecting partially visible objects,
robot assembly control etc.
4. To innovate networking of sensors and control of manufacturing sensors tracking the
mean time between operation, process, detection of machine faults, evaluation of FMS
cell, quantifying quality of work piece etc.
5. To analyze the concepts of fiber optics in sensors and control systems with various
industrial applications
UNIT – I
Introduction:
Manufacturing applications of photo detectors, detection methods through beam detection,
Reflex detection & Proximity detection. Applications of inductive and capacitive proximity
sensors, Understanding microwave sensing applications laser sensors and limit switches.
UNIT – II
Advanced sensor technology
Identification of manufacturing components, bar code, transponder, electro-magnetic identifier,
surface acoustic waves, optical character recognition, and fuzzy logic for opt-electronic colour
sensor in manufacturing, Sensing principles, colour theory, unit colour measurement, colour
comparator, colour sensing algorithm, design in fuzzy logic colour sensor.
UNIT – III
Sensors in FMS
Vision sensors, image transformations, robot visual sensing tasks, edge detection & extraction,
Detecting partially visible objects, cryogenic manufacturing applications, measurement of high
41
temperature, multi sensor, control robot assembly, collection & generation of process signals in
decentralized manufacturing system
UNIT – IV
Net working of sensors
Control of manufacturing sensor tracking the mean time between operation intervention, sensor
tracking mean time of intervention, sensor tracking the yield, sensor tracking the mean process
time, Diagnostic systems, resonance vibration analyzer, sensing motor current for signature
analysis, acoustic, temperature, quantifying the quality of work piece. Evaluation of FMS cell
UNIT – V
Fiber Optics in sensors and control systems
Introduction, Photoelectric sensors-long-distance detection, Fiber optics, types of fiber optics,
optical fiber parameters, factors affecting the selection of position sensors, sensor alignment
techniques, principal of fiber optics in communication, configuration of fiber optics, flexibility
and testing of fiber optics, applications of fiber optics.
Text Books:
1. Sabne soloman, sensors & control systems in manufacturing. Mc-Graw Hill book
Company Network, 1994.
2. N.L.Buck & T.G.Buckwith, Mechanical measurement, Addison Wesley Publishing
Co.1973.
References books:
1. Doebelin, Measurement systems: Applications & design, International Student Edition,
1974
Course Outcomes:
1. They will be able to adopt their ideas or apply appropriate tools available with the
newer sensor technologies used for automation in industry.
2. The students will have the ability in identifying the components, color theory etc
through programming sensors.
3. The students will have clear idea about the different kinds of sensors used to work in
different concepts or topics like robot visual sensing, detecting partially visible objects
etc.
4. They will be able to adopt their ideas about new technological sensors and control
systems in detecting machine faults, program faults, and also in checking the quality of
work piece.
5. The students can organize innovative ideas to overcome difficulties facing by the
industry using fiber optics in sensors and control systems
42
COMPUTER AIDED PROCESS PLANNING
Course Code: MCIM –E11
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4 : 0: 0
Preamble:
Process Planning has been a major part of decision making in all the industries for continuous
growth. Over the years process planning has evolved into computer aided process planning
which helps in reducing overall lead time of the system. It provides the system with a
systematic planning strategy for getting optimal outcomes.
Course Learning Objective:
1. The aim of the course is to provide the students, with an opportunity to conceive,
design, and implement products quickly and effectively, using the latest techniques
involved in planning
2. It will helps in bridging the gap between CAD/CAM and Concurrent Engineering.
3. The students will be exposed to skill of quick decision making.
4. The subject helps the students to be familiar with the GT coding concepts.
5. The students learn various concepts of part design representation and tolerance and
Students will be exposed to various advanced planning software’s being used in the
industries.
UNIT – I
Introduction: Process Planning,
Approaches to process planning - Study of a typical process planning - role of process planning
in CAD / CAM integration-Concurrent Engineering, Part design Representation: Tolerance
concepts - Geometric Tolerance
UNIT – II
Drafting Practices in Dimensioning and Tolerancing
Geometric Transformation - Data Structure - GT coding, DCLASS, OPITZ system, MICLASS
system
UNIT – III
Process Planning:
Decision tables and Decision Trees - Process Planning, Variant Process Planning, Generative
Process planning – AI, Geometric modelling for Process Planning - Process Capability
Analysis
UNIT – IV
Computer Aided Process Planning Systems:
Logical Design of Process Planning - Manufacturing System component, Production Volume,
Production families - CAM I, CAPP, MIPLAN, APPAS, AUTOPLAN and PRO, CPPP,
Genetic Algorithm and Integrated Process Planning systems
UNIT – V
Genetic algorithm in CAPP
Practical use of CAPP in real Manufacturing area, Expert systems, Fuzzy Logic in Process
Planning, Totally integrated process planning and Case study
43
Text Books:
1. Rao, 'Computer Aided Manufacturing', Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company, 2000
2. Nanua Singh, 'Systems approach to Computer integrated Design and Manufacturing',
John Wiley & sons, 1996
Reference Books:
1. Gideon Halevi and Roland. D. Weill, 'Principles of Process Planning, A logical
approach', Chapman & Hall 1995
2. Tien - Chien Chang, Richard. A. Wysk, 'An introduction to Automated process
planning system', Prentice Hall, 1985.
Course Outcome:
1. The students can express the concept of CAPP, thereby making him a better
process planner.
2. The student can assess and implement CAPP techniques for specific application
leading to better sequencing and scheduling of the system.
3. The students can enhance the production sequence using advance planning
software’s.
4. The stages of development in CAPP technology will help the students to innovate
newer techniques and processes.
5. Students can practically implement the concepts of GT and coding.
44
RAPID PROTOTYPING
Course Code: MCIM- E12
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble
The current marketplace is undergoing an accelerated pace of change that challenges
companies to innovate new techniques to rapidly respond to the ever changing global
environment. A country's economy is highly dependent on the development of new products
that are innovative with shorter development time. Organizations now fail or succeed based
upon their ability to respond quickly to changing customer demands and to utilize new
innovative technologies. In this environment, the advantage goes to the firm that can offer
greater varieties of new products with higher performance and greater overall appeal.
At the center of this environment is a new generation of customers. These customers have
forced organizations to look for new methods and techniques to improve their business
processes and speed up the product development cycle. As the direct result of this, the industry
is required to apply new engineering philosophy such as Rapid Response to Manufacturing
(RRM). RRM concept uses the knowledge of previously designed products in support of
developing new products.
Course Learning Objective
1. The aim of the course is to provide the students, with an opportunity to conceive,
design, and implement products quickly and effectively, using the latest rapid
prototyping methods and CAD/CAM technology
2. The students will be exposed to the history of product development and its stages in the
manufacturing arena
3. Technologies associated with material addition process are identified and its advantages
are evaluated.
4. The students learn to differentiate various process parameters associated with Rapid
manufacturing technique
5. Selectively choose tooling techniques for a specific application
UNIT - I
Introduction: Prototype Fundamentals, History of RP system, Fundamentals of RP, Growth of
RP industry, classification of RP system.
Stereo Lithography Systems: Principle, Process parameter, Data preparation, data files and
machine details, application.
UNIT - II
Selective Laser Sintering: Type of machine principle of operation, process parameters, Data
preparation for SLS, application.
Fusion Deposition Modelling Principle, process parameter, path generation, application
Solid Ground Curing: Principle of operation machine details, applications, case studies.
UNIT - III
Laminated Object Manufacturing: Principle of operation, LOM materials. Process details,
application.
Rapid Prototyping Data Formats: STL format, STL file problems, Building valid and invalid
tessellated models, STL file repair, other translators, new formats, standards for representing
layered manufacturing
45
UNIT - IV
Rapid Manufacturing Process Optimization Factors influencing accuracy, data preparation
errors, Part building errors, Error in finishing, influence of build orientation.
Materials for RP: Introduction, Types of materials, liquid based materials, solid based
materials, powder based materials, case studies.
UNIT - V
Rapid Tooling: Indirect methods for RT, Direct methods for RT
Reverse Engineering: Measuring Devices, CAD Model construction from point cloud, data
handling and reduction methods, application and trends,
Industry Perspective: Guidelines for Implementation, Operating Issues, Managing Issues,
Service Bureaus, Rapid Prototyping Consortia
Text Books:
1. Stereo lithography and other RP & M Technologies, Paul F.Jacobs: “SME, NY 1996.
2. Rapid manufacturing, Fiham D.T & Dinjoy S.S verlog London 2001.
3. Rapid Prototyping: Principles and Applications By C. K. Chua, K. F. Leong, C. S. Lim
4. Rapid Prototyping: Principles and Application…(Hardcover) by Rafiq I. Noorani
Reference Books:
1. Rapid prototyping, Terry Wohler’s Report 2000” association 2000.
2. Rapid prototyping materials by Gurumurthi. IISc Bangalore.
3. Rapid automated by lament wood. Indus press New York.
Course Outcomes:
1. The students can express the concept of product design stages and methods, thereby
making him a better product designer.
2. The stages of development in rapid prototyping technology will help the students to
evaluate and look forward for newer techniques and processes in the future
3. The student can assess and implement RP techniques for specific application leading to
better ROI for the company that uses RP machines
4. The students can enhance the production sequence of tooling process by choosing the
correct material for the job
5. The students are in a position to incorporate the productivity sequence by choosing the
right CAD
46
NON - TRADITIONAL MACHINING
Course Code: MCIM E13
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
The basic objective of all machining operations is to remove excess material to obtain the
desired shape and size. Unlike in the traditional machining operation as cited above,
unconventional machining uses special technique for the removal of material. The source of
energy could be electrical, mechanical motion, chemical reaction, power radiation or fluid
motion etc. Normally the magnitude of energy involved will be highly concentrated at any
given point/location. Very rapid development of newer materials having higher hardness and
other mechanical properties which demand higher dimensional accuracy and high production
rate, a need for developing newer manufacturing process arose. This has resulted in various
non-traditional machining processes,
 USM Process
 Abrasive jet machining
 Thermal metal removal process
 Chemical machining process
 Plasma arc machining
 LBM process
Course learning objectives:
1) To demonstrate the need for development of newer/ non-traditional machining
processes.
2) The student will be able to compare the traditional machining processes with nontraditional machining processes with respect to the advantages, applications.
3) The student will be able to identify different energy sources like fluid motion, electric
current, high speed electrons, high energy radiation, etc.
4) To analyse the concept, mechanism, parameters associated with the processes.
5) To demonstrate the operational principles, advantages applications, limitations of the
various non-traditional machining processes.
UNIT –I
Introduction
Need for non-traditional machining processes, Processes selection c1assification on –
comparative study of different processes, Mechanical Process: Ultrasonic MachiningDefinition-Mechanism of metal elements of the process- Tool feed mechanism, Theories of
mechanics of cutting, Effect of parameters, applications. Abrasive Jet Machining: Principles parameters of the process applications-advantages. Thermal Metal Removal Process: Electric
discharge machining Principle of operation –mechanism of metal removal.
47
UNIT –II
Basic EDM circuitry
Spark erosion get Analysis of relaxation type of circuit material removal rate in relaxation
circuits- critical resistance parameters in Ro Circuit- Die electric fluids-Electrodes for spark
surface finish. Applications, Electro chemical and chemical processes: Electro chemical
machining (ECM) Classification ECM process-principle of ECM Chemistry of the ECM
parameters of the processes determination of the metal removal rate - dynamics of ECM
process-Hydrodynamics of ECM process-polarization.Tool Design-advantages and
disadvantages - applications. Electro Chemical Grinding-Electro Chemical holding
electrochemical deburring. Chemical Machining: Introduction-fundamental principle types of
chemical machining Maskants- Etchenes- Advantages and disadvantages-applications.
UNIT –III
Plasma Arc Machining:
Introduction-Plasma-Generation of Plasma and equipment Mechanism of metals removal, PAN
parameters-process characteristics - type of torches applications. Electron Beam Machining
(EBM): Introduction-Equipment for production of Electron beam - Theory of electron beam
machining Thermal & Non thermal type’s characteristics, applications
UNIT –IV
Laser Beam Machining (LBM):
Introduction-principle of generation of lasers Equipment and Machining procedure-Types of
Lasers-Process characteristics-advantages and limitation applications Ion Beam Machining:
Introduction-Mechanism of metal removal and associated equipment process characteristics
applications
UNIT –V
High Velocity forming process
Introduction - development of specific process selection comparison of conventional and high
velocity forming methods - Types of high velocity forming methods- explosion forming
process-electro hydraulics forming magnetic pulse forming.
Text books:
l. Bhattacharya "New technology" Institution of Engineers, India
2. HMT "Production technology" Tata Mc Graw Hill.
3. P.C Pandy & H.S. Shan "Modem Machining Process" Tata McGraw Hill.
4. ASM "Metals hand book" Vol-3.1980
Reference Books:
1. F.M Wilson "High velocity forming of metals" ASTME PreticeHall.
2. Adithan "Modem Manufacturing Method"
3. P.K. Mishra "Modem Machining Processes".
Course learning Outcomes:
1. Student learns and understands, explains the need- history for the development of
newer/ non-traditional machining process.
48
2.
3.
4.
5.
The students will demonstrate the comparison between non-traditional machining
processes with the traditional machining processes with respect to the different
parameters.
 Energy sources
 Economics of the processes
 Shape and size of material etc.
The students analyse the concept, mechanism of material removal with respect to
different processes.
Different parameters associated with the process, their influence on the machining, will
be analysed.
Advantages, applications and limitations of the various non-traditional machining
processes will be evaluated.
49
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND ERGONOMICS
Course Code: MCIM E14
Prerequisites: Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
With change in technology different approaches of making design in industry and its
comfortness have evolved. There are continuous studies on improvement of the product life by
using various techniques. There are some standard methods of preparing the design
approaches. And also there is a need to improve the methods of making human life more
comfort. This course deals with the study of such advanced methods of design to serve the
required purpose.
Course Learning Objectives:
1. Students are initially made to know the concept of the subject Industrial Design and its
creating ability.
2. Students will have the knowledge to study various methods of industrial design.
3. To analyze different processes/ terminologies of the various Control and display and its
applications.
4. To obtain brief description of visual effects of line and form and the mechanics of
seeing.
5. The students will have the knowledge to improve aesthetic concepts of various
products.
UNIT –I
Introduction:
An approach to industrial design, elements of industrial design structure for industrial design in
engineering application in modern manufacturing systems. Ergonomics And Industrial Design:
Introduction, general approach to the man machine relationship, work station design, working
position.
UNIT –II
Control And Display:
Shapes and Sizes of various controls and displays, multiple displays and control situation,
design of major controls in automobiles, machine tools etc, design of furniture, design of
instruments. Ergonomics and Production: Ergonomics and product design, ergonomics in
automated systems expert systems for ergonomics, anthropomorphic data and its applications
in ergonomic design, limitations of anthropomorphic data, use of computerized database.
UNIT –III
Visual Effect Of Line And Form
The mechanics of seeing, psychology of seeing, general influences of lined and form. Colour:
Colour and Light, Colour and Objects, Colour and the eye, Colour consistency, Colour terms,
reaction to colour and colour continuation, colour on engineering equipments.
50
UNIT –IV
Aesthetic Concepts
Concept of unity, Concept of order with variety, Concept of purpose style and environment,
Aesthetic expressions. Style components of style, house style, observations style in capital
goods.
UNIT –V
Industrial Design In Practice
General design, specifying design equipments, rating the importance of industrial design,
Industrial design in the design process.
Text books:
1: Mayall W.H.” Industrial Design for Engineers” London Hliffee Books Ltd., 1988.
Reference Books:
1. Introduction to Ergonomics, R C Bridger, McGraw-Hill, Publications.
2. Brien Shakel” Applied Ergonomics Hand Book” ButterWorth Scientific, London1988.
3. Human Factors in Engineering Design, Mccormick.
Course Outcomes:
1. Students are capable to define the concept of the subject Industrial Design and its
creating ability..
2. Students are capable and they can study various methods of industrial design
3. Students are capable to analyze different processes/ terminologies of the various
Control and display and its applications.
4. Students are capable to obtain brief description of visual effects of line and form and
the mechanics of seeing.
5. Students will have the knowledge to improve aesthetic concepts of various products.
51
ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY
Course Code : MCIM E15
Prerequisites : Nil
Credits: 4:0:0
Preamble:
In day to day life we are coming across different types of materials pertaining to engineering
field. We have conventional materials whose properties are already there in the hand books. As
the new inventions are taking place, the conventional materials are not fit at that place. So there
is a need for newer materials which suits to the need, with improved properties and structures.
And also there is a need for the newer materials with improved mechanical, chemical,
electrical and other properties. This course deals with the study of such advanced materials to
serve the required purpose.
Course learning Objectives:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Students are initially made to know the concept of the conventional materials and
their structures such as atomic structures, electronic configuration, etc., and their
applications.
To obtain brief descriptions for the need of newer materials which are having
better improved properties to suit with conventional materials.
To analyze the types of ceramic materials and their properties, processing and their
applications.
To evaluate the properties of different composite materials and their applications.
To analyze the different processing/ fabrication techniques of composite materials,
their characterization, testing, etc.
Unit -I
Development of newer materials: properties of materials and classification of materials based
on functional, application, environmental and other effects. Structure of atom, atomic bonding
force and bonding energy, lattice structure, lattice defects, unit cells, basics and crystal
structure, point defects, dislocation and its types.
Unit –II
Ceramic materials: Introduction to ceramic materials, types of ceramic material structure of
ceramics. Processing of ceramic by different methods, different properties of ceramic,
application of ceramic, Glass ceramic and processing, processing of clay products and
refractory, and their applications
Unit –III
Powder metallurgy: Introduction to powder metallurgy, application and limitations of powder
metallurgy. Characteristics of metal powder and testing methods, properties like upper density,
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tap density, flow rate, green density properties of sintered compaction, different methods of
powder manufacturing, powder conditioning and compaction sintering and application of the
above.
Unit – IV
Composite materials: Introduction to composite materials, classification of the composite
materials and properties of MMC , CMC,PMC etc., different materials of matrix and
reinforcement, hybrid composites. Lamina, laminates.
Processing of composites – PMC, MMC and CMC, resin transfer molding and its applications.
Unit – V
Surface treatment: Introduction to surface engineering, applications, factors effecting
selection of surface modifications, surface quality and integrity, concepts. Mechanical
treatments, thermal and thermo mechanical treatments, tuff reading surface treatment hardening
and its different methods, different deposition process.
Text Books:
1. Materials and Processing in Manufacturing – E Paul Degarmo, J T Black,
Ronald A Kohser Pub 2006.
2. Powder Metallurgy – A K Sinha, Sapna Publication 2009.
Reference Books
1. Fibre Reinforced Composites – P K Mallick.
2. Metal Matrix Composites – Minoru Taya, Richard J Arsenault.
3. Composite Materials Hand book – M M Schwartz, McGraw Hill.
Course Outcomes:
1. Students are capable to define the concept of materials i.e., conventional materials with
their structure, such as electronic configuration, structure of atom, etc.
2. Students become aware of different conventional materials such as metallic and nonmetallic materials, structures and their applications.
3. Students will be able to demonstrate the need for newer materials by comparing the
limitations of conventional materials.
4. They will be able to compare the types of newer materials along with their properties
and applications.
5. They will be able to compile about the properties, structure of ceramic materials and
their need for newer applications and processing techniques.
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