Download Leaf Classification File

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Transcript
Title of lesson: Leaf Classification
Grade Level:
3rd – 5th Grade
Subject: Science/Math
Ohio Content Standards:
Science: Diversity and
Interdependence of Life; Classify
common plants according to their
characteristics.
Math: Geometry and Spatial
Sense; benchmark c2 – describe classify, compare and model 2 and 3
dimensional objects using their attributes. Data Analysis and Probability;
benchmark e3 – Interpret and construct Venn diagrams to sort and describe
data.
Objectives:
Students will understand basic facts about leaves and leaf attributes.
Students will become familiar with leaf vocabulary
Students will learn that attributes are used to classify.
Students will learn how to identify Simple versus Compound leaves.
Students will learn how to distinguish between leaf shapes.
Students will learn how to distinguish between leaf edges.
Students will learn how to classify leaves according to their attributes of
Simple/Compound, leaf shape, and leaf edge.
Materials:
Construction paper rings labeled with Simple, Compound (in the same color)
Construction paper rings for the shape of a leaf:
Labeled - Rounded, V-shaped, Heart, Uneven, and Flat (in the same color)
Construction paper rings for the edges of a leaf:
Labeled – saw toothed, smooth, and lobed (in the same color)
Deck of cards with various leaves.
Dichotomous Key
Book: “Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf” by Lois Ehlert
Procedure:
1. Read: Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf by Lois Ehlert
Discuss with your students. Ask the students to name some tree
leaves. Write the leaves on the board. Discuss. Ask students how
the leaves are different. Discuss. Tell the students that they are
going to classify leaves today by their attributes.
2. Review Vocabulary:
Vocabulary:
Simple Leaf- one leaf on a stem (Birch)
Compound Leaf-more than one leaf on a stem (Honey Locust)
Edges:
Saw tooth-jagged (Walnut)
Smooth-smooth edge (Aspen)
Lobed-forms several lobes along edge (oak leaf, maple)
Shape:
Rounded -attaches to the stem along a curve
V-shaped -attaches to the stem at the center point of the V
Heart Shaped - attaches to the stem at the center point of a heart
shape.
Flat -attached evenly across the stem.
Uneven -attached to the stem unevenly.
2. State – Leaves are classified using their attributes in three ways.
3. First, whether they are simple or compound. (Show examples of
leaves that are simple and compound and have students respond if
they are simple or compound and explain why.)
4. Leaves are also classified by their edges: Saw-toothed, Smooth or
Lobed. (Show examples and have students state the name of the
edges and explain why.)
5. Lastly, leaves are classified by their shapes: Heart, Rounded, Uneven,
V-Shaped, and Flat. (Show examples and have students state the
name of the shape and explain why.)
6. Ask the students if they have any questions about classification.
Discuss. Tell the students they will now practice classifying the
leaves. State the class will be broken into five groups and each group
will be given a deck of leaf cards to classify. State they will be given
rings for each type of classification and they will need to place the
appropriate leaf in each ring. Demonstrate with a few leaf cards and
the leaf rings.
7. Pass out the cards to the class. Pass out only the simple and compound
rings first. Ask the class to identify the simple and compound leaves
by placing the cards in the appropriate rings. When completed, ask
the groups to raise their hands so you can check their answers. When
students complete correctly, then collect the simple and compound
rings and give the group the “edge” rings (sawtoothed, smooth, and
lobed). When completed, ask the groups to raise their hands again so
you can check their answers. When students complete correctly, then
collect “edge” rings and give them “leaf shape” rings (Heart, Rounded,
Uneven, V-shaped, and Flat).
8. For an extra challenge: rings can be mixed and overlapped like a Venn
Diagram. For example, an Oak leaf could fit into 3 rings: smooth,
lobed, and simple.
9. Ask the class to clean up the rings and cards. Assign students to
collect 10 leaves for homework and classify using Simple/Compound,
Leaf Shape, and Leaf Edge.
Assessment:
Monitoring students process in classifying leaves with rings.
Resources:
“Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf by Louis Ehlert
www.enature.com
www.cas.psu.edu
www.hobart.k12.in.us
www.uwsp.edu
Submitted by:
Cassie Ohlrich
Gifted Educator
Van Buren Elementary School