Download Live Action – Lighting and Sound - Australian Children`s Television

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Live Action – Lighting and Sound
Year Level:
Year 5 to Year 10
Curriculum Study Areas:
English; The Arts
Themes/Topics:
Narrative Structure; Film Language; Genre; Symbolism and
Icons; Cultural Studies
Description:
This teaching kit outlines in detail the steps involved in
producing, directing and filming a television program or
movie. It explores many areas of production, including script
writing, casting, lighting, camera, sound and editing.
There are seven teaching activities linked to this resource
found in our Learning Centre.
Resources:
Lesson plan:
Lighting
In television and film production, the director works with the Director of Photography (DOP)
to make important decisions about the type of light required in each scene. The decisions
that need to be made include the intensity of the light, the mood required and the sorts of
artificial or natural lights required to do this.
When making these decisions, the DOP works with the Gaffer, a person experienced in
achieving the lighting effects that the DOP wants for the scene.
Lighting is an important part of creating mood. It can be varied to suggest a romantic mood,
a clinical atmosphere or create a dark, frightening mood (such as the use of dim lighting in a
horror film). Comedies, in comparison, may use much brighter lighting.
Getting the light correct on location often
requires the use of additional lights and
reflectors. The image on the left shows how
lights have been used to create additional
atmosphere for the particular scene.
The colour of lights is often a consideration
when creating mood. For instance, blue can
create a mood of coldness, loneliness or
hostility, whereas colours such as orange or
brown can create an atmosphere of warmth
or intimacy. Colour can be created through
the use of lens filters and coloured gels on
the lights.
© Australian Children's Television Foundation (except where otherwise indicated). You may use, download and reproduce this
material free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes provided you retain all acknowledgements associated with the
material.
Lighting can be varied to create depth in the image, to highlight particular objects or people
within the frame. Sometimes lighting can be used to emphasise certain characters and make
them stand out from the background. Direct lighting of a subject can give dramatic effects
and shadows.
Lighting is also an important way to communicate the time of day in the scene. A bedroom
set in a studio for example can be lit to reflect 'morning' with bright sunlight streaming
through the set windows and creating an overall sunny look, or it can be lit for 'night' and
reflect a lightning storm outside. The same set can have two distinctly different looks,
depending on the nature of the scene.
Activity
Examine the following examples of different uses and types of lighting,
comparing and contrasting the choices of colour and lighting used and
the possible reasons why. Consider the atmosphere created in each shot
and the information suggested about the story and characters.
Diana & Bruce, The
Genie from Down
Under 1
Round the Twist 2
Top Enders. Touch the
Sun
Top Enders.Touch the
Sun
"Darlene' and 'Otto' go
country and western.
The Genie from Down
Under 2
Round the Twist 2
Sound
Adding sound to the action on the screen helps create atmosphere. The background sounds
we hear (such as traffic, doors banging, computers, the wind etc.) make our viewing
experience that much more convincing. Atmosphere can be specific and naturalistic (that is,
we see feet and we hear footsteps) or ambient (such as sirens and background traffic noises
to suggest a city location).
© Australian Children's Television Foundation (except where otherwise indicated). You may use, download and reproduce this
material free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes provided you retain all acknowledgements associated with the
material.
Sound effects may be added from pre-recorded audio libraries or created specifically in the
sound studio. While the sound we hear may sound like natural sound, it can in fact be a
dozen or more sound tracks carefully balanced in terms of volume, clarity and sound
perspective (muffled, near, far way, filtered etc.). Exaggerating a particular sound by making
it louder, or reverberating it, can also contribute to the drama or suspense of a particular
scene.
Extra sound is always recorded on location by the sound recordist. This recording may be
used to supplement the final version.
Sound effects
Sound effects (FX) created live to the video/film in a recording studio are called Foley
effects, named after the person who invented the system.
Foley artists watch the film to find out which sounds need to be added, enhanced or
replaced. The job of the Foley artist is to then add sounds that make the experience more
real for the audience.
These sounds appear to be so 'normal' that most of the time we don't really notice them. For
example, to get the right sounding footsteps one or more people may walk in a sand or
gravel box in the studio while the scene from the television program or film is projected
behind them. This sound is recorded as the Foley artist walks in time with the character on
the screen.
Foley sounds are often created from unrelated items mixed together to create the desired
sound effect.
Dramatic dialogue
Dramatic dialogue is what the characters say to each other. It is significant to both the plot
development and characterisation. Dramatic dialogue is important as we learn about the
characters through what they say, how they say it and what others say about them.
© Australian Children's Television Foundation (except where otherwise indicated). You may use, download and reproduce this
material free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes provided you retain all acknowledgements associated with the
material.
Silence
Silence can be incredibly powerful in a film or television program. It can be used to convey
mood and atmosphere, and responses such as shock or suspense.
Voice over
Voice over is where a character or a narrator is speaking to the audience while action is
taking place on screen. Voice over is used in documentaries, for a character to express
thoughts, or tell the audience information that will not be revealed in the dialogue.
When a voice over is occurring, the characters usually have no dialogue. In drama it is quite
unusual for the characters' inner thoughts to be spoken as voice over.
Music
The emotional colouring of the music reinforces the mood of the scene and is often used to
manipulate audience emotion. Music can often change the whole meaning of what actors
are saying and it is often thought of as the equivalent of a narrator in a book.
Music is one of the most powerful ingredients in any scene, and when used well, can
dramatically affect all the other elements, adding suspense, mystery, excitement and drama.
Sometimes musical themes are used for individual characters and the audience identifies
that character with the music.
Most television and film productions use their own music composers to write music or scores
appropriate to the program or film. Well known songs and themes from other music can also
be used. Usually a royalty or fee has to be paid for such use.
© Australian Children's Television Foundation (except where otherwise indicated). You may use, download and reproduce this
material free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes provided you retain all acknowledgements associated with the
material.