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The Reformation and
National Power
1500-1800
Section 1:
The Catholic Church
Lost Power
Key Terms
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Great Schism
Indulgences
Boniface VIII
95 Theses (Pg. 386/389)
Act of Supremacy
Elizabeth I
Counter Reformation
Hapsburg
Edict of Nantes
Absolute Monarch
Cardinal Richelieu
Versailles (Pg. 399)
Prussia
Romanov (Pg. 402)
Hohenzollerns
Teaching Objective






Explain reasons for the decline of the
Catholic Church.
Distinguish between the teachings of Luther and
Calvin.
Define the meaning of the Counter Reformation.
Identify the political and military effects of the
Reformation.
Explain the advantages/disadvantages of Absolutism.
Provide examples of absolute monarchy in eastern
Europe.
Power politics affected the Church.

Becomes involved in politics

More powerful than the king or
emperor

Pope Boniface VIII (1294-1303)
Versus


King Philip IV of France (12851314)
Great Schism 1378-1417

Split the papacy
Church seen as a secular state

Secular—
complete separation of church and state


Power politics
Material wealth


Greed and Corruption
Indulgences—documents
The Reformation and
National Power
1500-1800
Section 2: The Reformation Divided
Europe
Germany Was the Natural Place for the
Reformation to Begin



Deep and serious
feelings
Independent states that
resisted control
Martin Luther
rd
Anabaptists—3
Branch

Characteristics of the
Anabaptists
Thomas Munster was one of
the founders of the
Anabaptist movement.
Fourth Branch of the
Protestant Reformation
Pages 392-394
Teaching Objectives


Discuss the fourth branch of the reformation
Describe the Counter Reformation and the
widespread effects of both the Reformation
and the Counter Reformation
The Fourth Branch
of the Reformation

The Tudors England
breaks with Rome

King Henry VIII

Catherine of Aragon


Anne Boleyn


Mary
Elizabeth I
Act of Supremacy
The Anglican Church

Henry VIII

Jane Seymour (#3)


Bloody Mary


Edward VI
Persecution of
Protestants
Elizabeth I

Creates the Anglican
Church
The Puritans and the Irish
disagree with the
Church of England


The Puritans object the
Church of England
The Irish rebel
Scottish vs. Irish still exists!
The Counter Reformation


The Roman Catholic
Church tries to win
people back
Jesuit Order


Ignatius Loyola
Council of Trent

Bans the abuse of the
selling of indulgences
and simony
Widespread Effects



Spread the ideas of
democracy and
representative
government
Encouraged education
Aid religious tolerance
and freedom
True or False?

Since Germans were not religious,
Germany seemed an unlikely place to begin.
True or False?

Luther believed that human beings could be
saved only by faith.
True or False?

Luther’s Ninety-five Theses condemned the
sale of indulgences by the Church.
True or False?

Luther’s translation of the Bible into German
brought both religious and cultural changes to
Germany.
True or False?

The end of the civil wars in Germany in 1555
brought Protestants and Catholics closer
together.
True or False?

The Lutheran Church was the only Protestant
religion in Europe during the 16th century.
True or False?

Calvinism taught that each individual must
earn salvation by doing good works.
True or False?

Elizabeth I fought to restore Catholicism to
England.
True or False?

Henry VIII of England became head of the
Anglican Church but recognized the pope’s
authority over him.
True or False?

Anabaptists were pacifists who believed they
owed allegiance only to God.
The Reformation and
National Power
1500-1800
Section 3: Religious Differences Mixed
With Political Conflicts
The Hapsburgs Split the Empire

Charles V



Philip II—Spain
Ferdinand I—HRE
Philip II was a devout
Catholic



Crush Protestants
The Inquisition
Military used to spread
Catholicism
Mary I—Bloody Mary





Mary I takes over after
Edward the VI dies of
tuberculosis
Catholic
Marries Philip II
Bloody Mary—400
clergy executed
Dies of cancer
Elizabeth I





Mary’s half sister
Philip II asks for her hand in
marriage
English sea captains pirated
ships
Helped the protestants in
the Netherlands
Defeats the Armada


Free and Protestant
Important naval power
Civil War in France


Huguenots vs. Catholics
Catherine de Medici—regent
for her sons


Bourbon Family




Catholic
Southern France
Protestant
St. Bartholomew’s Day
Massacre—10,000 people
Dies of pneumonia 1589
Henry of Navarre becomes King
Henry IV


Converted to Catholicism
Edict of Nantes



Protect the liberties of the
Huguenots
Allowed them to hold public
office
First to permit more than
one religion in the country
The Bourbons Take Over
The Reformation and
National Power
1500-1800
Section 4:
France Becomes Europe’s
Leading Power
Absolutism

Monarchs had complete
control over nation





All laws & courts
Collect / Spend taxes
Control Army
Economy: Commerce & cities important,
middle class economic and political
importance = $$$ = Success
Louis XIV = Absolute Leader of France
The Reformation and
National Power
1500-1800
Section 5:
Absolutist Monarchies Arose in
Central and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe Absolutism


Economy: Few cities existed, Church owned
large amounts of land, medieval system of
controlling land/labor = Success
“the Greats”



Comes with a price…
Treated people poorly
War important