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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
PLANNING DIVISION
STAFF REPORT FOR APPLICATION NO.
July 20, 2011
PLANNING AND LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATION BOARD
OVERVIEW
Case Number: Project No. 2011030011; Application No. 2197
Applicant: Robert Dickinson, Dickinson Consulting, Inc.
Property Description: Generally flat, heavily vegetated, contains wetlands
Site Location: Northeast corner of Seminole Woods Boulevard and U.S. Rte. 1
Property Owner: Palm Coast Seminole Group, LLC; Palm Coast One Group, LLC
Real Estate ID #: 31-12-31-5371-00000-0010; 31-12-31-5371-00000-0020;
31-12-31-5371-00000-0040
Project Name: Seminole Woods Master Planned Development
Current FLUM designation: Mixed Use
Current Zoning designation: High Intensity Commercial (COM-3) in part and Multifamily
Residential 2 (MRF-2)
Current Use:
Vacant
Prior Approvals: Overall Subdivision Plan, Final Plat, Site Plan Approval
(Integra Woods, Lot 4)
Total Acreage: 85.6+ acres, includes a portion of previously approved site plan for Integra
Woods apartment complex
Recommendation:
Approval
REQUESTED ACTION
Application Type: Rezone from Multifamily Residential 2 (MFR-2) in part and High Intensity
Commercial (COM-3) in part to Master Planned Development (MPD) District with Development
Agreement to allow up to 305,000 square feet of commercial development with an option of up
to 200 multifamily residential units on designated portions of the overall site.
Requested Action: Planning and Land Development Regulation Board recommend to City
Council to approve application request per Chapter 2 Review
Authority, Enforcement and Procedures of the Unified Land
Development Code.
Planning Division Staff Report
RZMPD App. No. 2197
Page 1 of 13
Page 2 of 13
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION:
Per Section 2.05.02 Neighborhood Meeting Requirements; A. Meetings Required. As the
initial step in the review process, Developers are required to conduct a neighborhood meeting
for various application types. The purpose of conducting the meeting is to enable residents and
property owners the opportunity to gain insight of the development and present questions and
concerns to the applicant for incorporation into the overall project, where appropriate.
A copy of the notice to the adjoining neighborhood, along with the sign in sheet and comments
must be provided to the City prior to commencement of the public hearing process.
The applicant provided staff with the required documentation confirming that the neighborhood
meeting was held in accordance with the specified requirements.
Per Section 2.05.03. Public Hearing Notice Requirements: B., the applicant has also mailed
via certified mail, return receipt requested, notification of the public hearings (PLDRB and City
Council) and posted signs on the property. To date, the City has not received any comments
from members of the public regarding the application request.
SITE DEVELOPMENT PLAN SUMMARY:
A Development Criteria Table has been prepared by the applicant to allow flexibility in the
overall master plan while providing for a well planned project. The table, which is depicted on
the conceptual master development plan, is listed below:
DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA TABLE
TOTAL SIZE
ESTIMATED
BUILDING SF
OR
PLANNING RESIDENTIAL
AREA
UNITS
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
20,000 S.F.
129,267 S.F.
75,000 S.F.
21624 S.F.
20,855 S.F.
21,624 S.F.
16,000 S.F.
ESTIMATED
ESTIMATED ESTIMATED
BUFFER
VUA, ROAD
STORM
LANDSCAPE SQUARE
& PARKING RETENTION SETBACKS FT.
50,000 S.F.
25,000 S.F.
200,999 S.F.
83,000 S.F.
170,00 S.F.
25,000 S.F.
40,000 S.F.
20,000 S.F.
34,000 S.F.
19,000 S.F.
40,000 S.F.
20,000 S.F.
31,600 S.F.
16,000 S.F.
WETLAND CONSERVATION AREA
WETLAND CONSERVATION AREA
EXISTING LAKE AREA
62,000 S.F.
224,000 S.F.
181,580 S.F.
50,206 S.F.
69,076 S.F.
50,206 S.F.
34,400 S.F.
TOTALS
C (OPTION)
G (OPTION)
172 UNITS
28 UNITS
AS REQUIRED
AS REQUIRED
25,000 S.F. *
16,000 S.F.
181,580 S.F.
34,400 S.F.
ACRES
3.6
157,000
637,226
487,150
131,830
142,931
131,830
98,000
1,463,836
340,632
139,445
14.6
11.2
3.0
3.3
3.0
2.3
33.6
7.8
3.2
3,728,738
85.6
487,150
98,000
11.2
2.3
Page 3 of 13
BACKGROUND /SITE HISTORY
This site was annexed into the City of Palm Coast in 2004.
A final plat was approved by the City of Palm Coast in March, 2006, and created four
development lots. Lots 1, 2 and a portion of Lot 4 comprise the 85 acres of this Master Planned
Development request. Lot 3 and the built portion of Lot 4, which is the Integra Woods apartment
complex, are not included in this application for a master planned development. The
development status of each lot is as follows:
Lots 1 and 2 are currently vacant. Lot 3, also vacant, is not included in the Master Planned
Development request because it is separately owned and is now somewhat isolated by the
Integra Woods apartment complex and an existing borrow lake. Lots 1 and 2 are zoned for High
Intensity Commercial (COM-3).
Lot No. 4 is currently zoned as Multifamily Residential 2 (MFR-2). The lot fronts both Seminole
Woods Boulevard and U.S. Hwy. 1. A site plan approved in 2007 for Lot No. 4 created Integra
Woods, a 482 multifamily apartment complex with ancillary facilities. To date, only 310 units and
the ancillary facilities (clubhouse) have been built. The unbuilt portion of the Integra Woods
complex consists of 172 units on 11 acres that is now owned by Palm Coast Seminole Group
and therefore is included in this application for master planned development.
A large wetland system runs through the middle of the entire site which comprises the Black
Branch Swamp. Approximately 340 acres of the swamp north of and adjacent to this site were
dedicated from the Grand Landings project to Flagler County. A Wetland Overlay District is in
effect on Lots 1 and 2.
In 2009, the property owner dedicated approximately .13 acres within Lot 2 and located
adjacent to U.S. Hwy. 1 to the City of Palm Coast for a wellhead. The City owns other wells
north of the site.
The applicant is proposing a conceptual master development plan in an attempt to reposition
the uses allowed on the property. Access points and development intensities for each Planning
Area are depicted in graphic and chart form on the master development plan.
ANALYSIS
FUTURE LAND USE AND ZONING INFORMATION
The following table summarizes the general existing and proposed land use and zoning
information:
USE SUMMARY TABLE:
CATEGORY:
EXISTING:
PROPOSED:
Future Land Use Map (FLUM)
Mixed Use
Mixed Use
Zoning District
High Intensity Commercial
and Multifamily Residential 2
Master Planned Development
Overlay District
Wetland Overlay District
Preservation
Page 4 of 13
Use
Vacant, heavily wooded
Mixed use commercial,
high density residential
Acreage
81 +/- acres
85 +/- acres
Access
U.S. Rte. 1 and Seminole
Woods Parkway
U.S. Rte, 1 and Seminole
Woods Parkway (Refer to
Master Plan for locations and
restrictions)
SURROUNDING LAND USES AND COMPATIBILITY:
North: Flagler County
FLUM:
Zoning:
Supporting:
Conservation, Timberlands/Ag.
PUD
Preserved wetlands
South: Flagler County
FLUM:
Zoning:
Supporting:
Industrial
Industrial
Scrap yard
East:
FLUM:
Zoning:
Supporting:
Residential
Duplex
Scattered homes
FLUM:
Zoning:
Supporting:
Conservation
PUD
Preserved wetlands
City of Palm Coast
West: Flagler County
INFRASTRUCTURE AND CONCURRENCY EVALUATION
No on site infrastructure is in place to serve the development. Off site infrastructure is available
in proximity to the property boundaries.
The following table illustrates a listing of concurrency elements, current availability status and
corresponding conditions affecting the proposed development.
CONCURRENCY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMARY TABLE
Service/Standard:
Availability:
Conditions:
Roads/Transportation
U.S. Rte. 1
Provide off-site operational
Seminole Woods Parkway
roadway
improvements
(turn lanes, de-acceleration
lanes, etc.) at U.S. Rte. 1
and Seminole Woods Blvd.
Transportation concurrency
determined at the time of
site plan application
Water
City of Palm Coast
Connect to existing service
lines located at Seminole
Woods Blvd. and US Rte 1
Page 5 of 13
Sewer
City of Palm Coast
Solid Waste Disposal
Drainage
Yes
Yes
Parks and Recreation
No
Schools
Interlocal
place
Agreement
Connect to existing service
lines
located
along
Seminole Woods Blvd.
increase
in
residential
intensity above 482 units
requires
lift
station
improvements.
Mix
of
commercial uses may also
trigger
lift
station
requirement
None – private contract
Provide on-site stormwater
retention facilities;
discharge limited to
downstream structure
conveyance capabilities
(culvert at Seminole Woods
Blvd.).
Developer provided on-site,
per Comprehensive Plan.
in Applicant executes
concurrency at site plan
ANALYSIS BASED ON UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE CHAPTER 2, SECTION
2.05.05 (Development Order)
The Unified Land Development Code states: When reviewing a development order application,
the approval authority shall determine whether sufficient factual data was presented in order to
render a decision. The decision to issue a development order shall be based upon the following,
including but not limited to:
A. The proposed development must not be in conflict with or contrary to the public
interest;
Planning Staff Finding: The proposed use change will increase the amount of commercial land
available at a potential major intersection and is deemed not to be in conflict with or contrary to
the public interest and serves to complement the shopping needs of the adjacent communities.
Commercial uses located at major intersections serve a wider traveling public without disrupting
residential areas.
B. The proposed development must be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and the
provisions of this LDC;
Planning Staff Finding: The requested use is consistent with and furthers the goals and
objectives of the Comprehensive Plan.
Page 6 of 13
C. The proposed development must not impose a significant financial liability or
hardship for the City;
Planning Staff Findings: Any improvements associated with public improvements will be
ensured via Performance/Maintenance Bond (Technical Site Plan Application level)
D. The proposed development must not create an unreasonable hazard, or nuisance, or
constitute a threat to the general health, welfare, or safety of the City’s inhabitants;
Planning Staff Finding:
Due in large to the mandates of the respective authority
regulations/policies, the character of development poses no unreasonable hazard, or nuisance,
or constitutes a threat to the general health, welfare, or safety of the City’s inhabitants.
E. The proposed development must comply with all other applicable local, state and
federal laws, statutes, ordinances, regulations, or codes;
Planning Staff Finding: Local, as well as all other state and federal laws, statutes, ordinances,
regulations, or codes specific to the uses within the proposed Master Planned Development, will
comply, as applicable.
ANALYSIS BASED ON UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE CHAPTER 2, SECTION
2.06.03 (Rezoning)
The Planning and Land Development Regulation Board and City Council shall consider the
following seven criteria
Staff has addressed each of the established criteria accordingly and offers the following
findings:
A. Whether it (rezoning) is consistent with all adopted elements of the
Comprehensive Plan and whether it furthers the goals and objectives of the
Comprehensive Plan.
Staff Finding: The rezoning request is consistent with elements of the Comprehensive
Plan and more particularly Chapter 1; Future Land Use Element; GOAL 1.4: ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT which states in part:
i. FINDING; “The City must increase its employment base to boost revenues and reduce
its reliance on ad valorem taxes generated by residential properties.”
ii. Objective 1.4.2 – Create Employment Centers and Jobs
Encourage the development of employment centers within close proximity to housing
and transportation corridors to maximize accessibility, convenience of residents, and to improve
the economic climate.
Staff Finding: The rezoning request is consistent with elements of the Comprehensive
Plan and more particularly Chapter 1; Future Land Use Element; GOAL 1.4: ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT. “The City must increase its employment base to boost revenues and
reduce its reliance on ad valorem taxes generated by residential properties.” However, the
current land use does not account for onsite wetland resources and additional
environmentally sensitive lands to the north. The MPD will create the framework to
perpetually protect, enhance and retain ecological connections to the north. Further, the
MPD encompasses low impact elements to retain a sustainable environment through sound
development practices.
Page 7 of 13
B. Its impact upon the environment or natural resources.
Staff Finding:
i. TOPOGRAPHY AND SOIL CONDITIONS
The Seminole Pointe site, measuring approximately 85.6 acres, is vegetated and
completely vacant. After the review of aerial photography, silviculture activities are
clearly evident within the site. In addition, wetlands are also evident within this area
which extends off-site to the north and south. The remaining on-site area reflects minor
disturbances with trail road extending northeast from US 1 and a borrow area / lake
along the eastern property boundary and continues off-site to adjacent properties.
Further description of these features is detailed in the Section D, Vegetative
Communities. The Soil Survey of Flagler County, Florida (U.S.D.A., Soil Conservation
Service, 1997) indicates the following three (3) soil types within the property:
1.
2.
3.
Myakka fine sand (11).
Placid, Basinger and St. Johns soils, depressional (12).
Smyrna fine sand (21).
Analysis:
The listed soil types appear consistent with the existing conditions.
Development of the site may impact on-site hydrology; however, it is not anticipated that
the proposed zoning change will negatively impact the surrounding topography or
prevent the proposed designation permissible due to Stormwater engineering
requirements regulated by the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD).
To the contrary, the onsite ecological enhancements will foster regional Black Branch
resources that has been adversely affected by past land uses and roadway associated
improvements (Borrow pit / lake, US1 and Seminole Woods Parkway).
ii. Floodplains
Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA), Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM)
source indicates that the majority of the site does lie within the Special Flood Hazard
Area (SFHA) or better known as the 100-year floodplain (A Zone with no established
base floods elevation). However, the southeast corner of the site is within an X Zone
(outside the 100-year floodplain).
Analysis: According to the information provided, the subject property is largely
comprised of an A zone (E, F, G, H and I pods) with remaining eastern pods situated
primarily within a X Zone, outside a special flood hazard area. The City of Palm Coast
Floodplain Regulation, Ordinance 2003-15 and subsequent LDC, was enacted to ensure
consistency with Comprehensive Plan Objective 6.1.11 and its policies 6.1.11.1, 6.1.11.2
and 6.1.11.4. Any proposed development will comply with the City’s FEMA approved
Floodplain regulation, including the determination of special flood hazard areas, and
compensatory storage to prevent potential flooding hazards. Development will be
directed away from the SFHA to the greatest extent practicable in accordance with Code
requirements.
Page 8 of 13
iii.
Vegetative Communities
The subject property is completely vacant and vegetated. A June 14, 2004 EMS
Environmental Assessment, December 20, 2010 ESI Protected Species Assessment,
and July 13, 2010 ESI Wetland Quality Assessment was provided as part of this
project’s application and is referenced here in. The remaining provided information was
sampled from 2007 ESI assessments associated with Integra Woods application
submittals. According to these assessments, the vegetative communities consist of
planted pine and mixed forested wetland connected to Black Branch to the north. These
vegetative communities and other associated landscape (Florida Land Use Cover Forms
Classification System) include: Coniferous Plantations, Hydric Coniferous Plantations,
Wetland Forested Mix and borrow lake.
Analysis:
Upland areas exist sporadically through noncontiguous acreages.
Development of the site should be limited as much as possible in high quality areas in an
effort to preserve natural resource functions.
Through preliminary investigation
conducted by ESI biologist(s), wetland resources have been assessed according to a
functional quality and categorized as low or high.
As detailed in ESI written
documentation provided as part of the application, onsite wetland resources have been
described according to vegetative composition and general quality. As detailed by ESI,
the hydric coniferous plantation wetlands have been exhibited to be low quality and have
been “manipulated to the point that wetland and hydrologic enhancement would have to
occur in order to the wetlands to be sustainable.” It may be inferred that these low quality
wetland resources have been degraded to the state of ultimately becoming upland area
and currently service the site’s ecological function through upland attributes. As
previously stated, the parcel also contains wetland habitat which is contiguous with
offsite wetlands associated with Flagler County owned environmentally sensitive lands.
This wetland forested mix community type has been designated with a high quality
designation. As described by ESI, “the high quality wetlands are self-sustaining forested
systems that sit lower in elevation, contain a diverse array of vegetative species, and
have little impact from prior human disturbances.” Development has been directed away
from these systems and strategies to enhance contiguous low quality wetlands have
been applied. Impacts to high quality wetland resources are facilitated by an access from
US 1; the Applicant has exhibited that the access is required by Florida Department of
Transportation (DOT) to sustain safe traffic patterns. These requirements have created
unavoidable impact to high quality wetlands. The conceptual master plan details these
disturbances and accounts for loss to ecological function through onsite preservation,
enhancement and perpetual protection of remaining resources. In addition, staff
recognizes that the MPD fosters opportunities to retain ecological connections to the
north to promote sustainability of resources on a more regional scale.
iv.
PROTECTED SPECIES DISTRIBUTION/ WILDLIFE UTILIZATION
Based on ESI field observations, the habitat found onsite is prime habitat for endangered
or threatened species, and contains the potential for usage by wading birds, ospreys,
eagles or other water dependent avian species due to the contiguous wetlands. Impacts
to habitat will be minimized as large wetland corridors will remain intact. During
numerous site inspections, no protected animal or plant species were physically
observed; however, evidence of use by the Florida black bear (Ursus americanus
floridanus) in the form of scat was observed near the westernmost Mixed Forested
Page 9 of 13
Wetland approximately 300 feet north of US 1 in November 2009. Black bears have
been seen to the north near the Flagler Airport, so it is likely that this species travels
through the property toward more rural western Bunnell. Numerous common species
have also been observed. No wading bird species were observed along the borrow area
/ lake, nor were any nests observed or known rookeries found to occur within the project
boundaries or in the immediate vicinity.
Analysis: The subject property is connected to large tracts which support black bear
habitat and corridor movement. Additional wildlife including some listed species may
utilize the site for foraging, nesting, and potentially denning opportunities but few upland
habitats exist that could support large numbers (i.e. healthy populations) of protected
and/or common species of wildlife. It appears that the onsite wetlands provide the bulk
of these habitat resources. As recommended in Section D, the preserved wetlands and
associated upland buffer be placed in a conservation designation. As part of the MPD
Agreement, measures will be taken to enhance low quality wetlands to facilitate a higher
habitat quality for black bear and to encourage natural recruitment of other species. The
applicant proposes a comprehensive habitat management plan which will house
extensive preservation and enhancement objectives; the plan will further incorporate
innovative planning techniques to minimize bear – human conflicts while promoting
educational awareness within the development site.
v. Environmental Sensitive Features
As previously detailed, the on-site wetlands connect directly to the Black Branch system
to the north; US1 has historically severed the natural connection to the south. No other
environmentally sensitive features exist within the site area. According to an Agreement
for Conveyance of Environmentally Sensitive Lands executed on December 19, 2005,
the lands to the north measuring approximately 266 acres “will be retained and
maintained forever predominately in the natural vegetative and hydrologic condition
existing at the time of the property transfer to the County.”
Analysis: Due to the nature of the connection to offsite wetlands, development of the
site will minimize impacts to contiguous high quality resources while proposing
preservation with enhancements through long-term management as mandated through a
comprehensive habitat management plan.
vi. Groundwater Resource Protection
According to the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) website and
City data, the nearest proposed and/or existing production well is within the project area.
The well is for active potable water production and regulated by the Land Development
Code which contains a well field protection element (10.03, LDC).
Analysis: Wetland habitat within the primary protection zone (500-ft. radius from
wellhead) will be perpetually protected and enhanced. Due to the required vehicular
access from US 1, access to the project site will be within immediate vicinity of the
wellfield and lie within the primary protection zone. Development shall comply with the
LDC to maintain assurances of potable water protection. The proposed zoning does not
elevate the potential hazards that exist within the current High Intensity Commercial and
Multi-family designations.
vii.
Historical Resources
Page 10 of 13
Staff conducted a Geographic Information System (GIS) search of the Florida
Department of State, Division of Historical Resources’ Florida Master Site File to
determine if any historical or archeological resources were located on the subject
property or with the immediate vicinity. The search concluded the site area had not
been surveyed for historical resources. However, the City does require developments
during plan review to provide a qualified environmental professional assessment or State
Historical Protection Officer (SHIPO) determination letter that details the potential for
historical resources existing on the subject property.
Analysis: It cannot be concluded at this time that historical resources exist on the
subject property due to lack of reference material and on-site investigations; however,
existing regulations exist to protect against impact to historical resources during
development.
Staff Finding: The project site has generally been altered by anthropogenic activities with
high quality wetlands sustaining diverse community resources and wildlife habitat. Although
a high quality wetland system may be impacted by creation of an access road extending
from US 1, environmental impacts can be addressed. Mitigation for minimal wetland impact
has been coordinated thru St. John’s River Water Management District; permits have been
secured.
C. Its impact on the economy of any affected area.
Staff Finding: The rezoning should result in a favorable economic impact on the affected
area specifically, and the Palm Coast community, in general. The rezoning and development
plan reinforces the need of the community to improve the types of shopping and
employment opportunities and future economic demands in an area that historically has
been underserved.
D. Its impact upon necessary governmental services such as schools, sewage
disposal, potable water, drainage, fire, and police protection, solid waste or
transportation systems.
Staff Finding: Impact to essential services was conducted by respective City departments
during the rezoning and Development Agreement review process. Government services to
the site can be further addressed based upon engineering studies for specific users. The
developer acknowledges responsibility to upgrade existing systems or provide facilities at no
cost to the City.
E. Any changes in circumstances or conditions affecting the area.
Staff Finding: The rezoning recognizes the transportation patterns of the area and
addresses the suitability of non-residential uses located in proximity to major arterials.
F. Compatibility with proximate uses and development patterns, including health,
safety, and welfare of surrounding residents.
Staff Finding: The rezoning and accompanying development plan provide a unique
opportunity to further one of the primary objectives of the Comprehensive Plan Future Land
Use Element’s Mixed Use designation; that is to provide opportunities for residents to work,
shop, and engage in recreational opportunities in reasonable proximity to residential areas.
The proximate location to an existing 310 unit apartment complex and other residential
areas and the existing major thoroughfares in the immediate area reinforces the site as a
Page 11 of 13
legitimate live, work opportunity and, as situated, most compatible to those immediate
communities.
G. Whether it accomplishes a legitimate public purpose.
Staff Finding: This rezoning is seen as having a benefit to the public’s health and welfare
and will facilitate the provision of goods and services in the immediate area.
___________________________________________________________________________________
ANALYSIS BASED ON UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE CHAPTER 2, SECTION
2.09.04 –Review Findings (Master Planned Developments)
The Planning and Land Development Regulation Board and City Council shall consider the
following criteria, in addition to the findings listed in Subsection 2.05.05, when reviewing a
master planned development application:
A. Consistency with all adopted elements of the Comprehensive Plan and whether it
furthers the goals and objectives of the Comprehensive Plan.
Planning Staff Finding: The requested use of a Master Planned Development is consistent
with the Comprehensive Plan and will allow for orderly growth and development.
B. Consistency with the general intent of the LDC.
Planning Staff Finding: The requested use of a Master Planned Development is consistent
with the LDC as indicated and summarized by the following:
 Establishment of overall project land uses, intensities and densities, subject to further
refinements as additional site development planning is undertaken by the developer;
 Identification of general access points and their effect on the development plan;
 Creation of cross access from existing apartment complex, enhancing access to goods
and services;
 Identification of arterial access opportunities and their effect on the development plan;
 Identification of flood zones and their effect on the development plan;
 Identification of general wetland areas and their effect on the development plan.
C. Degree of departure of the proposed development from surrounding areas in terms of
character and density/intensity.
Planning Staff Finding: No additional uses are being proposed in the planned development
that are not already allowed by the existing zoning designations. Uses that are allowed in the
ULDC but not applicable in the location are prohibited by the Development Agreement.
D. Compatibility within the development and relationship with surrounding
neighborhoods.
Planning Staff Finding: The proposed development is sufficiently separated from the adjacent
residential areas. Further buffering can be addressed in the site planning process. Uses and
intensities are within the range of what could be approved outside of the master planned
development process.
Page 12 of 13
E. Adequate provision for future public education and recreation facilities,
transportation, water supply, sewage disposal, surface drainage, flood control, and
soil conservation as shown in the development plan.
Planning Staff Finding: All essential public facilities inclusive of off-site transportation matters
will be accomplished by the applicant as provided for in the DA, the Unified Land Development
Code and other agencies as applicable (e.g. SJRWMD for flood control, drainage, etc.).
F. The feasibility and compatibility of development phases to stand as independent
developments.
Planning Staff Finding: The Development Agreement is structured such that each of the pods
can function as an independent self-sustaining facility complete with infrastructure, landscaping
and all other applicable LDC requirements otherwise not stated in the DA.
G. The availability and adequacy of primary streets and thoroughfares to support traffic
to be generated within the proposed development.
Planning Staff Finding: Access to the development site will utilize existing primary roadways
and a proposed spine road that provides direct access throughout the site and to the Integra
Woods property. Off-site operational improvements however will be required during the
Technical Site Plan process.
H. The benefits within the proposed development and to the general public to justify the
requested departure from standard development requirements inherent in a Master
Planned Development District classification.
Planning Staff Finding: The Master Planned Development use category and accompanying
Development Agreement was recommended for this application to accomplish the following
private/public benefit:
1. To recognize the existing major arterials and their support for the transmission of goods
and services.
2. Efficiently designate land use entitlements, while recognizing existing site characteristics,
including wetlands.
3. Enabled the opportunity to negotiate terms by use of a Development Agreement
I. The conformity and compatibility of the development with any adopted development
plan of the City of Palm Coast.
Planning Staff Finding: Staff determination is the plan does conform and is compatible with
the adopted development plan for the City as outlined in the Comprehensive Plan and more
specifically the 2020 Vision for the City of Palm Coast, as noted below:





Attractive job opportunities, superbly designed commercial areas
Responsible growth and fiscal planning
Responsiveness to meeting the diverse needs of the citizens
Economic and community development opportunities
Promotion of Mixed Uses in appropriate areas
Page 13 of 13

Protection of natural resources and environmental ecosystems
J. Impact upon the environment or natural resources.
Planning Staff Finding: Refer to the staff analysis found on Pages 7 through 14 of this report.
K. Impact on the economy of any affected area.
Planning Staff Finding: Providing for more compact, interconnected land uses reduces time
and fuel energy to access goods and services, thereby improving economic productivity.
Creation of a master plan allows the developer to reposition the property and the City to ensure
that development takes place in a coordinated and efficient manner.
RECOMMENDATION:
Planning and Land Development Regulation Board recommend to City Council approval of
Application 2197 rezoning 85.6 acres from Multifamily Residential 2 (MFR-2) and High Intensity
Commercial (COM-3) to Master Planned Development as stated and illustrated.
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