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TALKING ABOUT THINGS
THAT MATTER
Preparing Students for Success in an Interpersonal Performance Assessment
CSCTFL
Columbus, Ohio
March 2016
PRESENTED BY:
Workshops for World Language Instruction
Karen Luond Fowdy and Lisa Hendrickson
Email: [email protected] // [email protected]
http://fowdyhendrickson.wikispaces.com/
Facebook : Workshops for World Language Instruction
Twitter: @WisFrau / @lisa_lrh
OVERVIEW
BY THE END OF THIS PRESENTATION you will be able to . . .
• identify characteristics of the interpersonal mode of communication
• assess performance in the interpersonal mode of communication
• design instruction to prepare students for success moving from INPUT to PRACTICE
to independent, spontaneous student PERFORMANCE
 THEMATIC CURRICULUM UNIT: Where do we start?
 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT: How do we assess the INTERPERSONAL MODE
of communication?
 SPIRALED CURRICULUM: What do students already know?
 FUNCTIONS/STRUCTURES/VOCABULARY: What needs to be taught?
 SCAFFOLDING INSTRUCTION: How can we prepare students for success?
 DESIGNING INSTRUCTION: How do we teach the skills needed?
 How do we PREPARE and PRACTICE for the INTERPERSONAL ASSESSMENT?
 Are we ADVANCING our students’ language proficiency?
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Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction
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Theme: Cuando éramos niños (Childhood)
Targeted Proficiency Level: Intermediate low/mid
Enduring Understandings: Our life experiences affect who we are and who we will become
Essential Question(s): How did my childhood shape who I am today? How was my life different then from what it is like now? What does it mean to be a
child in the world?
GOALS:
(What should learners know
and be able to do by the end of
the unit?)
Learners will be able to:
 Share and reflect on childhood memories.
 Describe factors that influence childhood experiences. (e.g. place in the family, friends, school, culture, economics,
media. . . )

Interpret historical and cultural perspectives of literature and media produced for children
Communication Mode:
Interpretive
Presentational
Interpersonal
Performance Task
(Summative Assessment)
Understand the childhood memories of
a native speaker.
Prepare an illustrated description of
your life as a child to share with your
classmates and other teenagers around
the world. Consider elements that might
be unique to your culture.
Discuss your memories of childhood
with your classmates. Talk about what
you were like then and what you are like
now. How did where you grew up affect
your experiences?
How Standards are addressed:
Cultures
Cultures: What does it mean to be a child in the world? Practices / Products / Perspectives
Comparisons: Learners compare children's TV programs, songs and stories from other cultures with media from their own
culture.
Connections: Learners consider concepts from classes such as Child Development, Language Arts and Literature.
Communities (School and Global): Learners volunteer to work with bilingual children in pre-school and elementary
programs, after-school tutoring, and public library programs.
Communities (Lifelong Learning): Learners find songs, stories, and games from other cultures that they understand and
enjoy.
(Products – Practices –Perspectives)
Comparisons
(Language & Culture)
Connections
(to and from other subjects)
Communities
(beyond the classroom; lifelong
learning)
What needs to be taught for
students to be successful in
the performance
assessments?
Language Functions:
•
Describe childhood
•
Ask questions
•
Agree / Disagree
•
Compare / Contrast
•
Ask follow up questions
•
React
Structures:
•
Imperfect tense
•
Comparatives (more than, older,
younger etc.)
Vocabulary:
•
Childhood activities and games (i.e. tag,
etc.)
•
Descriptive adjectives (naughty, etc.)
Formative Assessments and
Learning Activities
Resources
Karen Luond Fowdy and Lisa Hendrickson
3
Adapted from Planning Curriculum for Learning World Languages, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2002
Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction
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Characteristics of the Modes of Communication
INTERPRETIVE MODE
Learners understand, interpret, and
analyze what is heard, read, or viewed
on a variety of topics.
 Based on authentic materials,
by native speakers for native
speakers
 One-way communication with no
opportunity to ask for
clarification
 Demonstrates understanding,
not just translating
 Requires the use of various
comprehension strategies
 Goes beyond reading /listening
for specific details or checking
for vocabulary understanding
 Takes into account the author or
speaker’s purpose and
perspective
PRESENTATIONAL MODE
Learners present information,
concepts, and ideas to inform, explain,
persuade, and narrate on a variety of
topics using appropriate media and
adapting to various audiences of
listeners, readers, or viewers.
 Planned, organized, rehearsed,
polished, edited
 Message is most important
 Prepared with audience in
mind: comprehensible,
interesting, culturally
appropriate
 Requires negotiation of meaning
 Can be presented in a variety of
forms, even for the same
performance assessment
 Asks for clarification
 Spontaneous
 Reacts / responds to partner’s
message
 Accuracy is more important
Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction
 Expands on ideas
 Keeps the conversation going
 Shows interest in what others
are saying
 Provides the opportunity to
demonstrate language skills
(not a focus on technology or
creative skills)
 Vocabulary and/or structure
errors do not interfere with
communication
 Uses strategies other than
English to clarify when partner
does not understand
 Employs background knowledge
of context and culture
4
INTERPERSONAL MODE
Learners interact and negotiate
meaning in spoken, signed, or written
conversations to share information,
reactions, feelings, and opinions.
4
INTERPERSONAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT
How do we assess the INTERPERSONAL MODE of communication?
From: "Level 3 Interactive Tasks - Analytic Rubric – from Fairfax County Schools
http://www.fcps.edu/is/worldlanguages/pals/documents/Level3AnalyticInteractive.pdf
PALS: Performance Assessment for Language Students - Fairfax County Schools
http://www.fcps.edu/is/worldlanguages/pals/index.shtml
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SPIRALED CURRICULUM
What do the students already know?
.
Intermediate High
“Interactive”: Engages, maintains communication for variety of purposes
Intermediate Mid
“Creates own thoughts”: More language independence
Memories of Childhood
Intermediate Low
“Survivor”: Recombines learned pieces, Simple situations
Novice Mid/High
“Parrot”: Memorized phrases, lists
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FUNCTIONS/STRUCTURES/VOCABULARY
What needs to be taught?
THEME
VOCABULARY
CREATE THEMATIC VOCABULARY
1) Gather what students already know
2) List new vocabulary students need for theme
3) Identify which words are needed for RECEPTIVE control
4) Identify which words are needed for PRODUCTIVE
control
FUNCTIONS
•
•
STRUCTURE(S)
•
•
Practice structures in context
(leading to IPA)
Limit the focus to structures as
needed for the theme
•
•
•
•
Describe childhood
Ask questions about childhood
experiences
Agree / Disagree
Compare / Contrast
Ask follow up questions
React
SCAFFOLDING INSTRUCTION
How can we prepare students for success?
GUIDED PRACTICE
Structured, Guided
PRACTICE ELEMENTS
of CONVERSATION
Practice
• Answer personalized
Build from 1 question to 2 to 3
questions about childhood
• Model /With partner/
on a worksheet
Change partners
• Compare answers with a
• Practice reactions
partner or group. Look for
• Generate follow-up
things you have in common
questions
and how you are different
• Consider strategies to
include others
GATHER PHRASES: What did
you need to say. . . ?
7
PUT CONVERSATION
TOGETHER
Independent, Spontaneous
Practice the whole
conversation
• Class generates list of
questions they will need to
ask
• Have conversation with
peer feedback
• Rotate groups
GATHER PHRASES: What did
you need to say. . . ?
Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction
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Moving from . . .
Classroom Activities – Building Repertoire
Teacher
Controlled
RECEPTION
Building toward
Practiced,
Memorized
LESSON PLAN
CONSTRUCT
Teacher introduces
Teacher/class practice
Teacher models
vocabulary/structures in
context of unit
performance task(s)
Teacher-guided practice
of structures/vocabulary
with class. Students
practice using individual
visual aids, guided
activities, comprehension
checks, in context of unit
performance task(s)
Students practice
vocabulary/structures in class
with partners, small groups
(working toward production) in
context of unit performance
task(s)
Teacher expands unit
vocabulary/structures,
keeping in mind what
needs to be learned for
RECEPTIVE CONTROL or
FOR PRODUCTION
Teacher-guided
conversation
incorporating functions in
context of unit
performance task (e.g.
asking questions, agreeing
disagreeing, responding,
reacting, etc.)
Students practice
conversations applying new
structures/vocabulary in
controlled small-group
situations with checks for
needed expansion of
structures/vocabulary/functions
Teacher models
performance task:
Teacher initiated and
guided class discussion
that parallels interpersonal
performance task
Teacher and students
identify elements of the
rubric and discuss
assessment of modeled
conversation
Students practice
performance task with
various groups, providing
opportunity for checks and
feedback.
Students see/hear model
of performance task (e.g.
conversation by native
speakers
Students practice
Homework:
Vocabulary/structures
independent practice
Spontaneous,
Independent
Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction
RECEPTION &
PRODUCTION
Students demonstrate
Students demonstrate
ability to apply
structures/vocabulary
independently) in context
of unit performance task(s)
Checks and feedback:
Homework
Formative assessments
Homework: Students write
a paragraph about the
theme (for ex. THEIR
childhood experiences).
Check for needed content,
unit vocabulary, specific
vocabulary needed by the
individual student, the new
structures.
Peer-coached practice
Students practice
performance task in small
groups with a student
“coach” who gives
feedback based on rubric
Interpersonal
Performance
Task
REAL-LIFE
APPLICATION
8
Open-Ended
8
EXAMPLE: Daily lesson plan (Childhood memories)
90% target language use by teacher and learners.
UNIT GOAL: Learners will be able to:
 Share and reflect on childhood memories.
 Describe factors that influence childhood experiences. (e.g. place in the family,
friends, school, culture, economics, media. . . )
 Interpret historical and cultural perspectives of literature and media produced for
children
LESSON OBJECTIVES: Learners will be able to
 Understand a narrative about the teacher’s childhood
 Compare their childhood to the teacher's narrative
INTRODUCE THE THEME:
Teacher shows a video clip of a childhood program from the target culture to begin to
activate the context of childhood memories.
ACTIVATE PRIOR KNOWLEDGE
Learners brainstorm what they can already understand and say about related to their
childhoods from previous themes, e.g. free time activities, school, family, etc.
INPUT
Teacher shows a picture from her childhood. She talks about where she lived and describes
what her life was like at that age. She asks the students questions along the way to provide
additional input, check for comprehension and to ask students about their own childhood
experiences. (e.g. yes/no, either/or questions)
PRACTICE
TEACHER GUIDED DISCUSSION-Teacher models questions/answers/reactions/responses
with individual students
CHECK
Learners read a text about the teacher’s childhood. They demonstrate comprehension by
completing short answer questions in English.
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La Niñez de la Profesora Hendrickson
Les voy a contar sobre mi niñez. Me crié en Wisconsin Dells, el
pueblo natal de mi familia. Mi bisabuelo llegó allí con su padre en 1857
cuando él tenía 13 años y mi familia ha vivido allí desde aquel
entonces. Cuando yo era niña, Wisconsin Dells era diferente de lo que
es ahora. No había los grandes parques de agua de ahora como Noah's
Ark. Además, los turistas no venían a Wisconsin Dells en el invierno
porque todo se cerraba y no había nada que hacer cuando hacía frío.
Wisconsin Dells era un pueblo turístico en esos tiempos, pero había
más atracciones que tenían que ver con la naturaleza como los paseos
en barco por el Río Wisconsin.
A mí, me gustaba mucho vivir en Wisconsin Dells porque era
un pueblo pequeño con una naturaleza abundante. Yo vivía en el campo. Mi casa estaba en un bosque con
muchos árboles, pájaros y animales. También, había un arroyo con dos estanques cerca de mi casa. Mi casa
estaba a un lado de un estanque y al otro lado del mismo estaba la casa de mis abuelos. Era un lugar muy
bonito que se llamaba "Wishing Hill." Mis hermanas y yo visitábamos a mis abuelos muy a menudo. Recuerdo
que mi abuela siempre nos daba galletas cuando la visitaba.
En esta foto, yo tenía tres años y mis hermanas y yo nos preparábamos para jugar en el arroyo muy
cerca de mi casa Mi hermana mayor, Debbie, me estaba ayudando a quitar los zapatos. En ese entonces
Debbie tenía siete años; ella era simpática, pero a veces era un poco mandona. Mi otra hermana Betsy tenía
cinco años en la foto. Betsy no era tan mandona como Debbie. Ella era un poco más reservada y seria. A pesar
de la diferencia en la personalidad de mis hermanas, me gustaba mucho jugar con ellas. La verdad es que las
tres hermanas nos llevábamos bastante bien cuando éramos niñas.
Cuando era niña, yo era la bebé "típica" de mi familia. Era muy sociable y me gustaba jugar y reírme.
Mis hermanas decían que yo era mimada porque nuestros padres me permitían hacer muchas cosas. Mis
hermanas eran mis mejores amigas. Como vivíamos en el campo, siempre jugaba con ellas en la casa, en el
bosque y el agua del arroyo. No teníamos vecinos, jugábamos entre las tres. Me gustaba jugar al aire libre.
Atrapaba ranas del arroyo, andaba en barco por los estanques y en el invierno, patinaba sobre hielo. No
miraba la televisión porque no teníamos un televisor. Sí existía la televisión en esa época, pero mi familia no
tenía mucho dinero y además mis padres no querían que pasáramos mucho tiempo sentadas mirando
programas tontos.
En conclusión puedo decirles que pasé una niñez muy feliz junto a mi familia jugando y disfrutando de
la naturaleza.
WHAT DID YOU UNDERSTAND? Read the above description of your teacher's life when she was a little girl and
answer these questions in English.
1) Where did your teacher grow up?
2) How was her town different then from what it is like now?
3) Describe her house - where it was located and what the area around her house was like.
4) How old was she in the picture?
5) Describe her sisters.
6) What was your teacher like as a little girl?
7) What did she like to do?
8) What does she say about watching television?
9) What are some cultural references that might need to be explained to someone from another place?
10 Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction 10
Lesson Reflection - TEACHER
1) Were the students aware of the performance goal(s) at the beginning of the class?
2) During what part(s) of the lesson were the student most engaged? Least engaged?
3) Did the activities prepare students to achieve the lesson's performance goals?
4) Were any activities too long? Too short?
5) Who did most of the talking today -- my students or I?
6) Did I resort to English during today's lesson? When? Why?
7) Could my students evidence the performance goal(s) at the end of the lesson?
Why (not)? How did they demonstrate their progress?
Adapted from: Greg Duncan, InterPrep, Inc., http://www.interprepinc.com
11 Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction 11
SELF-ASSESSMENT RUBRIC for World Languages
Student name:
Assessment:
Date:
Proficiency
Targets
Novice
Low
Novice
Mid
Novice
High
Intermediate
Low
Intermediate
Mid
Intermediate
High
Advanced
Low
What language do
I use?
Vocabulary
I can use a small
number of repetitive
words and phrases for
common objects and
actions.
I can use a limited
number of words and
phrases for common
objects and actions,
but they are repetitive.
I can use familiar
words and phrases on
familiar tasks, topics,
and activities. I can
elaborate a little.
I can use a variety of
words and phrases on
a range of familiar
topics. I can begin to
give more details and
elaborate on a topic.
How do I use
language?
Function &
Structure
I can use some simple
words to provide basic
information.
I can use words,
phrases and
occasional sentences
to provide basic
information.
I can use strings of
simple sentences to
express my
thoughts.
I can
combine words and
phrases to create
original sentences.
I can consistently use
words and
expressions to
communicate ideas on
a wide range of topics
and use expanded
vocabulary within a
topic.
I can use connected
sentences to narrate,
describe or explain.
I
can begin to
communicate in
paragraph length.
I can use extensive
vocabulary to
communicate ideas on
a wide range of topics
and within a topic. I
can use culturally
appropriate idiomatic
expressions.
I can communicate in
clear and organized
paragraph length.
How well am I
understood doing
the task?
Comprehensibility
I can be understood
only with great effort.
I can be understood
with difficulty by
someone accustomed
to a language learner.
I can use phrases and
short simple
sentences to provide
basic information.
I
can begin to combine
words and phrases to
create original
sentences.
I can mostly be
understood by
someone accustomed
to a language learner.
I can use words &
expressions from a
wide range of topics
and begin to use
expanded vocabulary
within a topic.
I can give details and
elaborate on a topic.
I can use strings of
sentences to describe
or explain. I can
combine simple
sentences using
connector words to
create original
sentences.
I can easily be
understood by
someone accustomed
to a language learner.
I can be understood
by native speakers,
even those
unaccustomed to a
language learner.
How well do I
understand?
Comprehension
I can understand
some isolated words.
I can understand
some simple
questions and
statements. I
frequently need to
hear things again.
I can understand
simple questions and
statements.
Sometimes I need to
hear things again.
I can understand
questions and
statements.
Sometimes I need to
hear things again.
I can generally be
understood by
someone accustomed
and those
unaccustomed to a
language learner.
I can understand the
main idea and most
details in
conversations on
familiar topics.
use only for Interpersonal Task
I can be understood
by someone
accustomed to a
language learner.
Content and Language Control
Did I complete
the task?
I can understand
questions and
statements from reallife situations which
may take place faceto-face or
electronically.
I can understand and
link ideas in extended
discussions. I can
participate actively in
most informal and a
few formal
conversations.
Reflection and Goals
Content
I did not address
the topic. Examples
and/or details may
have been
repetitive or
missing.
I discussed all
aspects of the
topic, but with little
or no details.
I discussed all
aspects of the topic
and provided some
examples.
How well do I
use the
language?
Language Control
My errors in
grammar, word
order, and word
choice prevent
communication.
My errors in
grammar, word
order, and word
choice often
prevent
communication.
My errors in
grammar, word
order, and word
choice sometimes
prevent
communication.
I discussed all
aspects of the
topic. I elaborated
on ideas and
provided relevant
and interesting
details and
examples.
My errors in
grammar, word
order, and word
choice do not
prevent
communication.
1) What you did well (BE SPECIFIC).
2) What will you work on for the next interpersonal assessment?
3) What can you do to improve your performance in these areas? (Be specific)
Adapted from: JCPS World Languages Rubric. (Adapted from the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines-Speaking (1999) and the ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners (1998) and Linguafolio
(2009). Changes are in italics.
12 Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction 12
WORLD-READINESS STANDARDS FOR LEARNING LANGUAGES
(2013)
GOAL AREAS
COMMUNICATION
STANDARDS
Communicate
effectively in more
than one language in
order to function in a
variety of situations
and for multiple
purposes
Interpersonal
Communication:
Learners interact and
negotiate meaning in
spoken, signed, or
written conversations
to share information,
reactions, feelings,
and opinions.
CULTURES
Relating Cultural
Practices to Perspectives:
Learners use the language to
investigate, explain, and reflect on
the relationship between the
practices and perspectives of the
cultures studied.
Presentational
Communication:
Learners present
information, concepts,
and ideas to inform,
explain, persuade,
and narrate on a
variety of topics using
appropriate media and
adapting to various
audiences of listeners,
readers or viewers.
Relating Cultural
Products to Perspectives:
Learners use the language to
investigate, explain, and reflect on
the relationship between the
products and perspectives of the
cultures studied.
Making Connections:
Learners build, reinforce, and
expand their knowledge of other
disciplines while using the
language to develop critical
thinking and to solve problems
creatively.
Acquiring Information
and Diverse Perspectives:
Learners access and evaluate
information and diverse
perspectives that are available
through the language and its
cultures.
Language Comparisons:
Learners use the language to
investigate, explain, and reflect on
the nature of language through
comparisons of the language
studied and their own.
Cultural Comparisons:
Learners use the language to
investigate, explain, and reflect on
the concept of culture through
comparisons of the cultures
studied and their own.
School and Global
Communities:
Learners use the language both
within and beyond the classroom
to interact and collaborate in their
community and the globalized
world.
Lifelong Learning:
Learners set goals and reflect on
their progress in using languages
for enjoyment, enrichment, and
advancement.
Interact with cultural
competence and
understanding
CONNECTIONS
Connect with other
disciplines and
acquire information
and diverse
perspectives in order
to use the language
to function in
academic and
career-related
situations
COMPARISONS
Develop insight into
the nature of
language and culture
in order to interact
with cultural
competence
COMMUNITIES
Communicate and
interact with cultural
competence in order
to participate in
multilingual
communities at home
and around the world
Interpretive
Communication:
Learners understand,
interpret, and analyze
what is heard, read, or
viewed on a variety of
topics.
13 Lisa Hendrickson and Karen Luond Fowdy, Workshops for World Language Instruction 13
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