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WT/TPR/S/322/Rev.1 • Cabo Verde
- 29 Table 3.1 Structure of applied MFN tariffs in Cabo Verde, 2015
(%)
2008
2015
Final bounda
100.0
100.0
100.0
Simple average tariff rate
10.8
10.3
15.9
Agricultural products (WTO definition)
12.0
12.0
19.3
Non-agricultural products (WTO definition)
10.6
10.0
15.4
Agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing (ISIC 1)
9.3
9.3
17.1
Mining and quarrying (ISIC 2)
2.5
2.5
6.6
Manufacturing (ISIC 3)
11.0
10.5
16.1
Duty-free tariff lines (% of all tariff lines)
42.7
44.1
5.1
Simple average rate of dutiable lines only
18.8
18.4
16.8
Tariff quotas (% of all tariff lines)
0.0
0.0
0.0
Non-ad valorem tariffs (% of all tariff lines)
0.0
0.0
0.0
Non-ad valorem tariffs with no AVEs (% of all tariff lines)
0.0
0.0
0.0
Domestic tariff peaks (% of all tariff lines)
6.9
6.6
2.5
International tariff peaks (% of all tariff lines)c
32.1
30.6
44.0
Overall standard deviation of applied rates
13.4
13.3
12.8
0.0
0.8
0.0
Bound tariff lines (% of all tariff lines)
b
Nuisance applied rates (% of all tariff lines)
a
b
c
d
d
Final bound rates are based on the 2015 tariff schedule in HS07 nomenclature. Implementation
period up to 2018.
Domestic tariff peaks are defined as those exceeding three times the overall simple average applied
rate.
International tariff peaks are defined as those exceeding 15%.
Nuisance rates are those greater than zero, but less than or equal to 2%.
Note:
The 2008 tariff is based on HS07 nomenclature consisting of 5,584 tariff lines (at 10-digit tariff line
level).
The 2015 tariff is based on HS07 nomenclature consisting of 5,768 tariff lines (at 10-digit tariff line
level).
Source:
WTO Secretariat calculations based on WTO IDB, CTS databases, and information provided by the
authorities.
3.10. Peak bound rates of 50% or 55% cover items such as chocolate, soft drinks, beer, spirits,
cigars, raw fur skins and fur clothing, soap and detergents, carpets and floor coverings, wigs,
drinking glasses, worked ivory, certain motor vehicles (new or second-hand), and furniture.13
Cabo Verde does not participate in any of the sectoral market access initiatives, but bound a
significant number of tariff lines at zero for goods included in the Information Technology
Agreement and in the Agreement on Trade in Civil Aircraft.
3.11. On average, Cabo Verde's applied MFN tariffs are well below the bound level. The simple
average applied rate fell slightly from 10.8% in 2008 to 10.3% in 2015 due to a higher incidence
of duty-free tariff lines and tariff reductions for some manufactured goods. Rates vary from zero to
50% with the highest average tariffs affecting broad product categories such as clothing (34.1%);
beverages, spirits, and tobacco (31.3%); and fish and fishery products (22.9%) (Table 3.2).14
This pattern is also confirmed when the tariff averages are calculated by HS 2-digit product groups
(Table A3.1).
13
For the peak tariffs, the bound rates were in most cases 57% upon accession with reductions (to 55%
or 50%) to be implemented by 2013.
14
The MFN ad valorem rates in Cabo Verde's customs tariff are 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%,
and 50%.