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AIDS 2016, Tuesday July 19, 2016
Abstract No. TUPDD0306
LOVE WITH HIV
A latent class analysis of intimate relationships among women living with HIV
enrolled in Canada's largest multi-site community-based research study
Allison Carter1,2, Saara Greene3, Catherine Hankins6, Lori A. Brotto5, Deborah Money4,5, Mary Kestler7, Sophie Patterson1,2,
Nadia O’Brien8,9, Kate Salters1,2, Erin Ding2, Kath Webster1, Valerie Nicholson1, Margarite Sanchez11, Marisol Desbiens10,
Danièle Dubuc8, Sally Y. Lin1,2, Robert S Hogg1,2, Alexandra de Pokomandy8,9, Mona Loutfy10, Angela Kaida1, On behalf of the
CHIWOS Research Team
1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University; 2. British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS; 3. School of Social Work, McMaster University; 4. Women’s Health Research Institute, BC Women’s
Hospital and Health Centre; 5. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia; 6. Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development (AIGHD), University of Amsterdam; 7.
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia; 8. Chronic Viral Illness Service, McGill University Health Centre,; 9. Department of Family Medicine, McGill University; 10. Women's College Research
Institute, Women's College Hospital; 11. ViVA, Positive Living Society of BC.
We gratefully acknowledge all of the women living with HIV who participate in CHIWOS; the
national team of Peer Research Associates, Co-investigators, and Collaborators; the BC Centre
for Excellence in HIV/AIDS for data support; all partnering organizations who support recruitment
and operations; and our funders.
Email [email protected] | Twitter @MissAllieCarter @CHIWOSresearch
BACKGROUND AND METHODS

Objectives: Characterize women’s relationships using multiple
measures, examine differences in love, identify psychosocial covariates.
The CHIWOS Study
Latent Class Analysis
1,425 women ≥16 years
Surveys at baseline and 18-months (peer-led)
Community-based research and feminist principles
A statistical method for uncovering meaningful subgroups
of individuals characterized by the intersection of multiple
observed variables.
RESULTS
3 types of sexual relationships

Five latent classes
Two longer-term classes had high
prob. of reporting an exclusive
married/common-law/living-apart
relationship of ≥3-years duration
vs. short-term classes, but diverged
on 4 measures shown.
No
relationship
47% (n=621)
Relationship
without sex
9% (n=118)
Shortterm/casual
16% (n=209)
Longterm/unhappy
7% (n=95)
Longterm/happy
22% (n=292)
Contentment with physical intimacy:
44%
97%
Contentment with emotional closeness:
24%
86%
High (equitable) relationship power:
43%
82%
59%
71%
39%
64%
Couple HIV-serodiscordance:

Love/affection: (p<0.0001)

Multinomial logistic regression: (referent: no relationship)




23%
48%
37%
Women >50-years were less likely to be in any relationship
Sex work [AOR: 3.03 (95% CI: 1.64-5.61)], violence [6.64 (3.33-13.26)]
short-term/casual
No depression [2.90(2.04-4.12)]
long-term/happy
No associations with gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or other variables.
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

Heterogeneity in women’s relationships
–

Sex did not equate with love/affection
–

Five multidimensional classes: half no relationship, one-fifth long-term happy
Relationships without sex had higher levels of love than some sexual relationships
Classes were associated with several psychosocial factors
–
Age, sex work, violence, depression
A need for a more nuanced, comprehensive, and
positive approach to women’s relationships and
sexuality.
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