Download Electrical Disturbances 2012

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Transcript
Teseq – Automotive Electrical Disturbances
Electrical Disturbances 2012
Tim Horacek, Product Manager
Teseq AG, Luterbach Switzerland
Happy Birthday Teseq!




1962
1971
1981
2006
Schaffner established by Dr. Hans Schaffner
First EMC test instrument launched
First ESD pistol released
Management Buyout as new company Teseq
TESEQ PROUDLY PRESENTS DECADES OF LEADERSHIP IN EMC TESTING
Three decades of ESD Simulators, designed from inception to comply with tomorrow's standards. Forty years
of advanced test solutions for EMC, applying the latest technology to set the standard for excellence in our
field. And last, but not least, TESEQ's half century of knowledge and experience in EMC - a heritage of our
early years as part of the renowned companies Schaffner, Chase and MEB. We are proud to celebrate our
history and are dedicated to continuing the challenge of industry leadership. With advanced technology, user
friendly software, a worldwide network of certified experts and our local services around the globe.
Contents

How do ISO 7637-2 and
ISO 16750-2 fit into “EMC” Testing?

What is new in ISO 7637-2:2011?

Do I need to do these tests?

Emissions (measuring problems)

Immunity (simulating problems)

What do the standards simulate?

What are all these test levels and performance criteria?

What are the key questions to ask myself to ensure I have
the right solution?
What is EMC?
EMC Immunity and Emissions
EMC - Electromagnetic Compatibility
Three Elements of an EMC Problem
 The ability of a device or system to function
without error in its intended
electromagnetic environment.
 All electronic devices make noise and must
be immune to noise created by other devices
 Measuring the noise from a device is called
“Emissions Testing”
 Simulations of these events called “Immunity
Testing” which means that the devices under
test are immune to the noise
Coupling Path
Noise
Source
Affected
Component
What is EMC?
Special Considerations for Motor Vehicles
 In ISO 7637 and variants, we are
considering transients and voltage drops that
are coupled over battery lines and signal lines
 Immunity Testing simulates ‘Conducted
EMC’ that occurs during normal or error
conditions in a motor vehicle.
 Emissions testing ensures that the noise
created by a device is less than specified
levels.
 Evaluates the performance of components
during simulated real-world EMC events
 These failure conditions are documented
and tests defined by International
organizations (ISO, SAE) and manufacturers
(Ford, VW)
Causes:
 Alternators, Converters, Switching Processes
 Electric Motors, Fuel Pump, Fan Motors
 Lights, Radio
 Every kind of electronic device
 Coupled on Power Lines and Wiring Harnesses
 Engine Start
Do I Need To Perform These Tests?
Typical Applications
Do I Need To Perform These Tests?
Ford Definition
Do I Need To Perform These Tests?
Users:
Automotive manufacturers
Test Providers (Test Houses)
Supplier of components or engineering services
Research Laboratories
What must be tested:
All electronic components or subsystems prior to full vehicle testing
When must devices be tested:
During initial design phases
During redesigns or modifications
Before production and sampling during production (*)
Do I Need To Perform These Tests?
UN ECE R10 Rev.04
E1
Do I Need To Perform These Tests?
UN ECE R10 Rev.04
Do I Need To Perform These Tests?
UN ECE R10 Rev.04
Emission Standard Introduction
ISO 7637-2 (2011)
Emissions
Electronic Switch
Simulates Fast Switching
‘Artificial Network’
Simulates Vehicle Wiring Harness
Battery
Source
Oscilloscope
DUT
The application is simple: The DUT is switched off, switched on, or different
operation modes are exercised and any feedback is
measured.
In simplest terms, we’re measuring the DUT’s inductive
kickback.
Emissions Switch – Before or After AN?
Application
Wiring Harness
For applications where the DUT is
far from the switch, the setup
should have the AN between the
switch (simulating the wiring
harness) and the DUT.
“Slow Pulse Setup”
Oscilloscope
Switch
Test Setup
Battery
Source
Artificial Network
Simulates Wiring Harness
Impedance
DUT
Emissions Switch – Before or After AN?
For applications where the DUT is
near the switch, the setup should
have the AN before the switch
Application
Wiring Harness
“Fast Pulse Setup”
Oscilloscope
Artificial Network
Simulates Wiring Harness
Impedance
Test Setup
Battery
Source
Switch
DUT
ISO7637-2 Emissions Test Layout
AN
DUT
“Slow Pulse” Setup
AN
DUT
“Fast Pulse” Setup
Emissions Relay or Electronic Switch?
When to use a relay and when the electronic switch:
Relay
 Voltages over 400V
 Usually must be approved by OEM
 Poor Repeatability, Slow/Chattering
 Must be replaced
 Should be production relay
from the vehicle containing the DUT
Electronic Switch
 Less than 400V
 Fast and Repeatable
 Voltage Drop Must be Accounted For
∆U ≤ 1V at 25 A
Differences: AN(LISN) defined in ISO7637-2 & CISPR25
ISO 7637 and CISPR Artificial Network are NOT the same
= 50 Ω
Differences Between ISO 7637 and CISPR Artificial Networks
Documenting the DUT Behavior
Items to be Documented:
 Peak Amplitude
 Pulse Duration
 Rise and Fall Times
 Burst Duration (if Repetitive)
 Repetition and Cycle Times
Other Standards
Almost every manufacturer standard adheres to ISO 7637-2 for emissions
measurements. They vary only slightly in setup (switch position and cable lengths).
For this reason, the AES 5501 was designed in several parts so that control over the
position of the switches and cable lengths is easy.
One notable difference is Nissan and Renault with two LISNs:
Typical DUT Behavior
and Measurements
Very Heavily Inductive
~ -450 V
Mixed R/L Load
~ -20 V
Much more severe pulses from DUTs with high inductance
AES 5501 - Emissions
Overview and Advantages
 100 A Operation
 Complete System
!
!
 Four-Part System for Cabling Requirements:
!
 5 uH Artificial Network
 300 ns Electronic Switch
 Low Voltage Drop
!
 Mechanical Switch Included
 Flexible System Controller
!
!
 Relay Box Footprints Exchangeable
(For various manufacturer relays)
 Adapters for ‘zero distance’ between
switches and AN
!
 Relay Voltages Provided in 12, 24 and 42 V
!
Teseq Unique Feature
!
Automotive Emissions System
AES 5501 Operation
Operation
 Dial Indicators for Repeatable Settings
 Selectable Shunt Resistors
 Operation Mechanical Switch and/or
Electronic Switch simultaneously
Triggering
 External (FG In)
 Manual (Push and Hold)
 Automatic
BMW GS 95002
BMW GS 95003-2
BMWN 600 13.0 Part 1
BMWN 600 13.0 Part 2
Daimler Chrysler DC-10615
Daimler Chrysler DC-10614
Daimler Chrysler PF-10540
Daimler Chrysler PF-10541
Daimler Chrysler PF-9326-D
DaimlerChrysler MBN 10284-2
Honda
Hyundai ES-X82010
ISO 16750-2
ISO 7637-2:2004
ISO 7637-3
Jaso D 001-94
Mazda MES PW 67600
Mercedes 211 000 42 99
Mercedes AV EMV
PSA Peugeot B21 7110
Immunity on Battery Lines
ISO 7637-2 & ISO 16750-2
DaimlerChrysler MBN 200 100-2
Fiat 9.90110
Fiat 7-Z0441
Fiat 7-Z0445
Fiat 7-Z0890
Ford ES-XW7T-1A278-AB
Ford ES-XW7T-1A278-AC
GM9113P
GM9117P
GM9123P
GMW3100GS (GMW3097)
GMW3097/3100
GMW 3172
PSA B21 7090 Rev E
Nissan 28401 NDS 02
Nissan 28400 NDS 03
Renault 36-00-808 / --G
SAE J1113-11
SAE J1113-12
SAE J1113/2
SAE J1113/22
SAE J1113/22
Toyota TSC 7548G
VW TL 820 66
VW 801 01
Etc.
ISO 7637-2:2011
ISO 16750-2
And other common pulses
Pulse 1 - A simulation of transients due to supply disconnection from inductive loads; it applies to a
DUT if as used in the vehicle, it remains connected directly in parallel with an inductive load
Pulse 2a - Simulates transients due to sudden interruption of currents in a device connected in
parallel with the DUT due to the inductances of the wiring harness
Pulse 2b - Simulates transients from dc motors acting as generators after the ignition is switched
off
Pulse 3a/3b - Occurs as the result of switching processes. The characteristics of this pulse are
influenced by distributed capacitance and inductance of the wiring harness
Pulse 4 - The voltage reduction caused by energizing the starter motor circuits of the internal
combustion engines
Pulse 4 Variants – Most manufacturer variations of pulse four are generally much more
complicated. For example Ford requires up to four arbitrary generators with four outputs to be
perfectly synchronized.
Pulse 5 – Simulation of a load dump transient occurring in the event of a discharged battery being
disconnected while the alternator is generating charging current with other loads remaining on
the alternator circuit at this moment
Magnetic Field Immunity – Simulates magnetic fields generated by electric motors, daytime running
lamps, etc. for DUTs with magnetically sensitive devices.
Transformer Coupled Sine Waves – Sinusoidal noise burst coupled on battery lines
Standards Around the World that Refer to ISO 7637
Standards based on ISO 7637
Manufacturers
International Bodies (and Working Groups)
BMW
Daimler Benz
Chrysler
Fiat
Ford
General Motors
Honda
Hyundai
Mazda
Peugeot
Nissan
Renault
Toyota
Volkswagen
...More!
SAE (SAE J1113-11, SAE J1113-12)
European Union ECE-R10 (References ISO 7637-2:2004)
JASO
IEEE
Standards Around the World that Refer to ISO 7637
Standards based on ISO 7637
Different automotive standards require different transient pulses. The requirements
are different in:
 Amplitude
 Impulse
 Frequency
 Pulse energy
 Test method, test setup
Where do these differences come from?
 Wiring harness
 Components
 Generator
 etc.
The experience of the standard writer, theoretical evaluations, empirical
measurement values and different test conditions do have a strong
impact on the parameterization of the pulses!
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 1
DUT
Inductive Load
U
Battery
t
Other
Loads
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 1
Pulse 1 Coupling
-
+
Battery Input
Output (To EUT)
Pulse Input
Pulse 1 Block Diagram
UA
0
Typical System Setup
NSG 5500
Pulse Shaping Network
e.g. MT 5511 or JT 5510
Analog Control
HV-PSU
Function Generator
e.g. NSG 5601
or NSG 5602
DC Source
CDN
Power Amplifier
e.g. PA 5840 or PA 5740
All battery events:
Pulse 4, Pulse 2b, etc.
and Battery Voltage generally
CDN 5500
All transients:
Pulse 1, Pulse 2a, Pulse 3a and Pulse 3b)
EUT
Typical System Setup
for Arbitrary Waveforms
CTR 5610
FG 562x
NSG 5601 or NSG 5602
Analog Control
IEEE 488.1 (NI GPIB)
PC with AutoStar
Battery Simulator
PA 5840 or PA 5740
DUT
Typical Transient Generator Circuit
HVPSU
Cw
RR
Rw
Ri
CR
To CDN
SW1
CW gets charged before the pulse
The ‘Fire’ signal sets SW1 (an electronic switch) to discharge CW
through the pulse shaping network.
CW and RW combined determine the pulse width.
RR and CR combined determine the rise time.
Ri is the output impedance, but combines with RR and the ESR
of CW to determine the real Ri.
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 2a
Switch off Lamp
DUT
Inductance of Wiring Harness
Load
(Lamp)
U
Battery
Battery Voltage
t
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 2a
Positive Pulse Coupling Methods
-
+
Battery Input
Output (To EUT)
Pulse Input
Positive Pulses
UA
0
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 2b
DC Motor
Ignition Switch
Motor
DUT
U
Battery
Battery Voltage
t
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 2b
Pulse 2b Block Diagram
Battery Voltage
0
t
ARB
Generator
EUT
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 3a/3b
U
DUT
3a
Battery Voltage
0
3b
Stray Inductance and Capacitance of Wiring Harness
t
Battery
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 3a/3b
Pulse 3 Block Diagram
Battery Input
Output (To EUT)
Pulse 3 Input BNC
Burst (3a/3b) Pulses
UA
0
200 ns
150 ns
100 ns
Pulse 3 (cont.)
Two Pulse Widths in Common Use
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Pulse 4
M
DUT
U
Battery
t
Pulse 4 Block Diagram
Other Cases
Pulse 4 Block Diagram
Other Cases
UN ECE R10 Rev.03
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Load Dump (Formerly Pulse 5)
U
Battery Voltage
t
Disconnect
Battery Lead
Battery
Motor
Alternator
Generating Charging Current
Conducted Automotive EMC Example
Load Dump (Pulse 5/5b)
Introducing the all-new LD 5550
 Amazing Power and Flexibility!
 Patented Pulse Shaping Technology
 30 – 1500 ms pulse width
in 1 ms steps
 Only generator capable of suppressed
pulses without affecting the pulse width.
 The most compliant Load Dump generator
 Perfect simulation of R/C discharge both
with and without battery.
 0.5 – 10 Ohm in 0.25 Ohm Steps
30.5, 40 Ohms
 Rise time 0.09 – 10 ms
New Load Dump Module
LD 5550
Pulse 5b, 100V, Ri = 2, Td = 400/200
Open
6Ω
4Ω
2Ω
1Ω
0.5 Ω
New Load Dump Module
LD 5550
Traditional Pulses Migrated to ISO 16750
In Summary:
Several pulses that were traditionally part of the EMC (ISO 7637) are
being moved to the ‘power quality’ standard (ISO 16750).
These include:
 ISO 7637-2:2004 Pulse 4 -> ISO 16750-2 “Starting Profile”
 ISO 7637-2:2004 Pulse 5a and 5b -> ISO 16750-2
“Load Dump A and B”
This is logical because these are not traditional EMC events, but
instead an issue of power quality. Curiously, Pulse 2b will likely
remain in ISO 7637 even though it could also be classified as a power
quality problem in the opinion of many experts.
Other Variations
Immunity Variations - Overview
Dozens of manufacturer standards exist, and they differ from the
international standards:
 Not all OEM standards are the same, even for pulse 1, 2, 3, 5 - type
transients
 Dozens of variations in starting pulses
 Several new methods of generating even common pulses
 Flexible equipment is preferred for forwards/backwards requirements
 Other Common Tests
Dips and drops (two variations)
Coupling on signal lines (two variations)
“Pulse 7” in a new form
Power magnetics, transformer coupled sine waves
Variations Examples
 Ford EMC CS 2009
Completely rewritten sections including inductive transient fixture
Frequency of many tests increased to 100 kHz
Overview of all new and changed tests available from Teseq
 Ford ES-XW7T-1A278-AC (2003)
Contains Special 4Ω ISO – type pulses
No verification other than defined in ISO 7637-2
 Ford ES-XW7T-1A278-AB (1999)
Contains 4 Ω ISO – type pulses
Contains special Ford verification procedure
Latest version always available at www.fordemc.com
Variations – Load Dump Examples
Actual test parameters vary greatly. Therefore, the test
generator must be able to fulfill all of these ranges listed in the
standard.
Exact test parameters are based on the expected
vehicle/alternator combination, and must be selected at the
advice of a responsible engineer or liaison to the
customer/manufacturer.
Variations – Load Dump Examples
 Numerous manufacturers’ standards disregard the ISO wording for transient
pulses, especially Load Dump
Tests Other than ISO - Coupling on IO & Signal Lines
Direct coupling with AN for Example:
 GMW 3100GS Pulse 7a/7b
 VW TL82066 Pulse 6
Tests Other than ISO - Dips and Drops
Details using DS 5630
AUX SOURCE +
AUX SOURCE -
Switch (MOSFET)
MAIN SOURCE +
EUT OUTPUT +
Transient
Protection
MAIN SOURCE Reverse Voltage Protection
and Buffer Capacitor
EUT OUTPUT -
Others
Conducted Sine Waves and Ground Shift
Others
Magnetic Field Immunity
Immunity to (low frequency) Magnetic Fields
(Power Magnetics)
Two different types of coils are
supported by Autostar and NSG 5600:
 Radiating Loop:
According MIL 461
(most often referenced test method)
GPIB
Battery Control
 Helmholtz Coil:
Alternative method
Main Source
Main Source
Battery Lines
Control Unit
Main In
CT 5610
FG 5620
TC 5650
PA 5640
DS 5630
Aux In
Main Output
NSG 5600
PA 5840 / PA 5740
Radiating Loop Coil
or Helmholtz Coil
Typically Loop Coils cover a very large
field range. The Loop Coil can be used for
every DUT size.
If Helmholtz Coils are used the coil size
determines the DUT size.
Immunity to (low frequency) Magnetic Fields
(Power Magnetics)
Helmholtz Coil
(High Test Volume but Lower Field Strength)
Radiating Loop Coil
(Large DUTs may require multiple tests,
but much higher field strengths possible)
Immunity on Signal Lines
ISO 7637-3
Pulse Immunity on Signal Lines
Overview
Generally, there are three ways to couple pulses onto signal lines:
 Wire Bundle: Capacitively with a Clamp or Jig
 Wire Bundle: Inductively with a BCI Clamp
 Individual Wires: Capacitively using Capacitors
Pulse Immunity on Signal Lines
“Slow Pulses”
ICC Method
Signal
Lines
U
Equivalent to
Pulse 2a (Negative)
I
DUT
0
Equivalent to
Pulse 2a
t
Inductive Coupling Clamp
(BCI Clamp)
DCC Method
-
Signal
Lines
+
470 pF
470 pF
DUT
Ground Plane
MT 5511
Inductive Coupling Clamp Method
“Slow Pulses”
BNC Output
MT 5511
INA 5580
Coax cable
PA 5x40
or
battery
(max 50cm)
Control/
Peripheral
CIP 9136
DUT
Battery Lines
Signal Lines
Signal GND
MT 5511
Inductive Coupling Clamp Method
“Slow Pulses”
ICC test setup according to
ISO 7637-3 using Teseq equipment
 DUT, CIP 9136, and Control/Peripheral have to be placed
on a insulating block (height 50mm) above the GND-plane.
BNC Output
MT 5511
INA 5580
Coax cable
 INA 5580 is connected to the BNC output of MT 5511 and
the output of INA 5580 is connected to BCI clamp CIP 9136
using a coax cable of 50cm max.
PA 5x40
or
battery
(max 50cm)
Control/
Peripheral
 The battery cables are connected to the DUT directly.
CIP 9136
DUT
 If the auxiliary equipment (control/peripheral) is grounded
locally this local gnd-connection shall be excluded from the
ICC.
Battery Lines
Signal Lines
Signal GND
INA 5580
 The INA 5580 is an adapter from the NSG 5500 and allows
fine-tuning the pulse to get the correct output during the
clamp calibration.
 Includes the necessary BNC to N-type connectors, adapters
and the necessary cables
 Designed for use with the CIP 9136, also available from
Teseq
Pulse Immunity on Signal Lines
“Fast Pulses”
CCC Method
Oscilloscope
50 Ω Attenuator
U
Equivalent to
Pulse 3a
0
DUT
Equivalent to
Pulse 3b
+
t
Ground Plane
DCC Method
-
Signal
Lines
+
100 pF
100 pF
DUT
Ground Plane
Capacitive Coupling Clamp Method
“Fast Pulses”
CDN 500
 Meant to be used with an attenuator for voltage monitoring
INA 5030B (recommended) or INA 500
 High quality plated brass surface
 Manufactured in exact conformance to ISO 7637-3
 Roller bearings
 40 mm (1.6”) max. harness size.
Signal Lines Immunity
Summary
Slow Pulses
Whole Wire Bundle
Each Individual Wire
Fast Pulses
Inductive Coupling Clamp (ICC)
Capacitive Coupling Clamp (CCC)
 Can test entire wire harness
 Uses CIP 9136
 Needs INA 5580 Adapter
 Can test entire wire harness
 Uses CDN 500
 Needs attenuator
Direct Capacitive Coupling (DCC)
Capacitive Coupling Clamp (CCC)
 Directly coupled with 470 pF Cap
 Directly coupled with 100 pF Cap
Understanding Test Levels and
Functional Performance Status Classifications
FPSC
D
IV
C
III
B
II
A
I
About Functional Status Performance Classifications
About Functional Status Performance Classifications
How does this relate to test levels? Who decides?
FPSC and Test Levels
What do I do if there is no OEM?
UN ECE R10 Rev.03
About Functional Status Performance Classifications
How does this relate to test levels? Who decides?
How can I maintain compliance with
so many standards?
Capabilities Overview
NSG 5500 – Capacitive Discharge Pulse Immunity Generator
 Teseq has always been at the forefront of the automotive immunity test systems. The NSG 5000 was
the first with systems based on a modular structure the NSG 5500 replaces it to now include an
exclusive 100A standard compact coupler.
 Built on capacitive discharge circuitry, the NSG 5500 improves on the exclusive Gemini technology
and expands on the unique pulse shaping qualities offering the only solution fully compatible with every
immunity requirement from ISO 7637-2: 2004
NSG 5600 – Battery Voltage Variation and Noise Simulation Generator
 Teseq was first with automotive synchronized function generators with the NSG 5200. The NSG 5600
expands on the exclusive single-click programming interface and powerful event cloning features.
 Based on a function generator/amplifier combination, the NSG 5600 includes features for simulation
of vehicle voltage starting profiles, dips and drops, transformer coupled and other sine wave noise and
magnetic field immunity testing
PA 5840 – Battery Simulating Power Amplifier
 Our battery simulators have always been market leaders. The PA 5840 expands on this with double
the bandwidth, now in a modular and upgradeable rack-mountable version.
 Based on years of experience with fast automotive amplifiers, the PA 5840 now features an exclusive
capacitive stability mode. Now users of Schaffner immunity systems can have it all: high current, very
high peak inrush current, high bandwidth and stability with the difficult and varying loads encountered
in automotive applications.
NSG 5500 – Transients, Pulse 1-3, 5-7
Transient Immunity System
 Built-In 100A (250A peak)
Battery Switch/Coupler
 True Modular Structure using Gemini
Technology
!
!
 Compliant “Capacitive Discharge
Into Pulse Shaping Network”
Automotive Pulse 3 Generator
 Two Ranges 5/100 ns and 5/150 ns
for Old and New Standards
!
Pulse 1, 2, 6, 7 Generator
 Supporting Latest and Classic Standards
!
 Able to be ‘swapped’ for new modules as
standards change
!
Load Dump (Pulse 5) Generator
 Compliant for the Full Range of Load
Dump Requirements for Ri and td
!
Teseq Unique Feature
 Fully programmable and calibrated
Ri, td and tr (1ms steps)
!
Flexibility for Full Compliance
NSG 5500
 Conducted Transients
Flexibility for Full Compliance
Hardware and software must allow fast development for new
requirements
Standards change EVERY YEAR
Solution: Flexible, modular design for rapid engineering changes
AutoStar 6
Smart Card
Expansion
NSG5500
New Module
NSG5600
Pulse Module
Sources/Couplers
Etc.
EUT
Measuring
Device(s)
Rack Mounted
Fits on standard
carrier card
All existing chassis, software
and firmware can be used
and updates are
automatically detected
Flexibility for Full Compliance
“Gemini” Modules
 MT 5511
Ford ES-XW7T1A278-AB
ISO 7637-2 (2004)
ISO 7637-2 (1990)
SAE J1113-11
(Others
Manufacturers
Standards)
 JT 5550
JASO A-1
JASO D-1
 JT 5510
JASO A-2
JASO B-1
JASO B-2
JASO D-2
JASO E
Nissan B-1
Nissan B-2
 And others
For Special Requirements or Projects
FLX 5510
FLX 5510 – Plugin Module for NSG 5500
 Build your own pulse networks
 100% compatible with every NSG 5500
system - no firmware or other upgrades required
 Easy solution for special projects
 Plug in a DIY 5510 submodule with your
design for your needs
 Supports a writeable and erasable surface for
marking your project
 Every pulse width from small µs range up to
30 ms possible. Where the LD 5550 takes over.
Using the FLX 5510
1
2
1. Using the supplied wizard,
determine what components to
use for the pulse network.
2. Populate the DIY 5510
submodule with the
components in Step 1
3
4
3. Document the project by
writing on the writeable
surface of the DIY
submodule
4. Select the pulse in AutoStar
closest to your project
parameters and run!
NSG 5600 – Pulse 4 Starting Profiles,
Dropouts and Magnetic Fields
Flexible and Powerful Programmable
Function Generator
 Easy to Program and Synchronize
up to Four Internal Function Generators
 Built-in “Clone” function for digital
capture and duplication from Oscilloscope,
or Imported from MathCAD, Excel etc.
!
!
 One-click Programming For:
Sine
Square Wave
Triangle
Exponential Function
DC and DC Ramps
 Able to be Modulated
!
 Built-In Transformer for
Coupled Sine Wave Noise
!
!
 Magnetic Field Immunity Tests
 Current or Loop Sensor Calibration
 Includes Small Power Amplifier for
General Use
!
Teseq Unique Feature
 Dips and Drops Testing (~1us)
!
Flexibility for Supply Voltage Variations
Note: Programming all these examples took less than 5 minutes
!
Flexibility for Full Compliance “Event Cloning”
Duplicated
Captured
Saved
Flexibility for Full Compliance
Mathematical Definitions
Note: In accordance with ISO 7637, transients pulses MUST be programmed
using a capacitive discharge into a pulse shaping network, the example shown
above is generally for advanced pre-compliant simulation only.
Immunity to (low frequency) Magnetic Fields
(Power Magnetics)
 For higher fields an external source can be connected, Autostar automatically switches between the
PA 5640 and the external source.
 Current control mode: The output current, and therefore the magnetic field, is automatically
regulated by Autostar!
 Multipoint calibration: Test points are calibrated prior to testing using a field measurement devise
(loop sensor or current measurement).
 Easy to use and fully automated test environment for magnetic field immunity tests!
Key Questions To Ask Yourself
Key Questions:
 What standards do I need to fulfil?
 Do I have copies of these standards?
 Does it make sense to become an active member in the committee if the standard is a
national or international standard?
 In these standards, what are the parameters of each test?
Pay special attention to battery levels, tolerances, impedance, peak voltage, rise times
and pulse widths.
 Do these tests have a verification procedure?
Can my current equipment fulfil these (check it)?
 Is this standard scheduled to be changed soon?
 Can I upgrade easily if the standard is about to change?
 Do I have all the accessories I need?
Load resistors, couplers, spacers, ground plane table cables, etc.
 Does my system have enough battery voltage or current?
 Does the battery simulator have enough bandwidth and/or a fast enough rise time?
Battery Simulator Options
Different applications require different sources
 AutoStar has a database which allows an operator to easily add a
new source.
 Some of the DC Source Options are
PA
PA
PA
PA
5740
5840-75
5840-150
5840-300
+/-60v 10A >150KHz Bandwidth Amplifier
-15V +60V 25A/75A peak up to 150KHz Bandwidth Amplifier
-15V +60V 50A/150A peak up to 150KHz Bandwidth Amplifier
-15V +60V 100A/300A peak up to 150KHz Bandwidth Amplifier
* The PA 5840 series supports peak current of 3x Inom for 200ms
 Other Amplifiers May Be Easily Integrated By The User!
PA 5840 – Battery Simulators
Pulse 4 and Other Simulations
 60V to 100A, up to 150kHz Bandwidth
!
 Capacitive Stability Mode
!
 <10us Rise Time Means Additional Dips
and Drops Switch Not Needed for Most
Dropout Applications
 3 x Iprog Inrush Current for 200ms
 25, 50 and 100A constant current
versions
 150 kHz Bandwidth
!
 Rack Mountable
PA 5840-150 Shown
(50A constant current, 150A peak)
!
Teseq Unique Feature
 Two Ranges for Efficiency
!
 < 10 mV noise!
!
 True Four Quadrant Operation
Experience – Partial Reference List
Adler
AEMC Mesures
Aishin
AM Cloarec Leasametric
BCom Electronics
BMW AG München
BONTECH
Bosch
Bose
Calsonic Kansei
China Motors MG
CMC
DailmerChrysler
Delphi
Denso
Denso
EMCtech
EMITECH
Fiat
Ford
Fujitsu Ten
Hitachi
Hubei Dong Feng
Hyundai
Int. Rectifier Automotive
Interschalt Sear Neubiberg
IPS
IPS Corp.
Katech
KEC
Knorr-Bremse
Kontron
Kontron, Eching
Magna Donnelly
Magneti Marelli
Matsushita
MECTRONIC, Darmstadt
Melexis GmbH Erfurt
Microtune GmbH Ingolstadt
Motorola
Nikki
Nissan
Noise
Nokia A/S
Omron
Paccar Automotive
Panasonic
Pierburg
Pollak
Portmann
Robert Bosch GmbH
Samsung
Sauer-Danfoss
Scania
SGSKES
Shanghai Golden
Siemens
Siemens VDO
Singler
Sony Ericsson
Toyota
Transtron
TRW
Toyota
Transtron
TRW
Tubitak
Valeo
VastGreenEnt.
Visteon
Volkswagen
Volvo
Xanavi
XM Satellite Radio
Example: Denso has >15 systems worldwide!
EMC Standard Committee Participation
Eric Dudenhoeffer – Prouct Manager
Tim Horacek – Product Manager
Document related concepts

Buck converter wikipedia, lookup

Opto-isolator wikipedia, lookup

Metadyne wikipedia, lookup

Pulse-width modulation wikipedia, lookup

Electromagnetic compatibility wikipedia, lookup

Rechargeable battery wikipedia, lookup

Electric battery wikipedia, lookup

Automatic test equipment wikipedia, lookup

Time-to-digital converter wikipedia, lookup

Chirp compression wikipedia, lookup

Radar signal characteristics wikipedia, lookup

Nuclear electromagnetic pulse wikipedia, lookup

Similar
DOC
DOC
HCT 2 midterm review 1
HCT 2 midterm review 1