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Honors 9th Literature
Daily Grammar / PSAT Practice # 16
SUBJECT and OBJECT pronouns
In the following passage, each sentence has a pronoun mistake:
My classmates and me like the new Spanish teacher. She is the kind of person whom would make
a good teacher. Her and me will probably get along well.
Notice the edited pronouns:
My classmates and I like the new Spanish teacher. She is the kind of person who would make a
good teacher. She and I will probably get along well.
SUBJECT pronouns (I, we, you, he, she, it, they) replace nouns used as the subject.
She and several students will travel to Spain. (She is the subject.)
The new teachers are that tall guy and she. (She is a predicate nominative.)
OBJECT pronouns (me, us, you, him, her, it them) replace nouns used as objects (direct,
indirect, object of preposition).
The teachers invited them to a welcome reception. (Them is the direct object.)
The principal gave her the keys to the building. (Her is an indirect object.)
A trip to Spain this summer will be good for us. (Us is an object of the preposition.)
Using WHO and WHOM
Use the subject pronouns who and whoever when they function as a subject or predicate
nominative.
Who will be the Latin teacher? (Who is the subject.)
Whoever the teacher will be, she will be well qualified. (Whoever is the predicate nominative.)
Use the object pronouns whom and whomever when they function as an object.
Whom did you like best as a teacher? (Whom is the direct object.)
For whom are you looking? (Whom is the object of the preposition.)
Try it
1. (Who, Whom) were the Neanderthals?
2. (They, Them) were relatives of the first humans like (we, us)
3. Recent findings tell (we, us) that Neanderthals, (who, whom) lived in Europe as far back as
500,000 years ago, were more modern than (we, us) used to think.
4. (Whoever, Whomever) said Neanderthals were brutes had it all wrong.
5. Anthropologists have learned a lot recently about (they, them) and (we, us) and about what (they,
them) can teach us today.
Identify the sentence error. If an underlined word or phrase contains a grammatical error, choose the
part that must be changed to correct the sentence.
The researcher to who we spoke was very informative.
Improve the sentence. Select the answer choice that best expresses the meaning of the underlined
portion of the original sentence.
Them and some other people are interested in learning about life as a Neanderthal.
a. Them and some other people
b. Some other people and them
c. They and some other people
d. They and them other people
e. Them and those other people.
Choose the correct pronoun:
for (who, whom ) did
you
write
that
awful
poem
Identify parts of speech: noun, pronoun (type and case), verb (type and tense), adverb, adjective,
preposition, conjunction (type), gerund, participle, infinitive, article
for
whom
did
you
write
that
awful
poem
Identify sentence parts: subject, verb (transitive or intransitive), direct object, indirect object, predicate
nominative, predicate adjective, appositive or appositive phrase, prepositional phrase (adjective or adverb),
gerund phrase, infinitive phrase, participial phrase, object of preposition, object of infinitive, object of
gerund, object of participle, objective complement, subject of infinitive
for
whom
did
you
write
that
awful
poem
Identify clauses and sentence type: independent, adverb, dependent, adjective dependent, noun
dependent; simple, compound, complex, compound complex
for
whom
did
you
write
that
awful
poem
Add punctuation and capitalization: end punctuation, commas, semicolons, apostrophes, underlining,
quotation marks
for
whom
did
you
write
that
awful
poem
Make a practice sentence that mimics this week’s sentence. Be sure to use the same parts of speech
and parts of the sentence.
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