Download Worksheet Answer Key THE JACKSON ERA

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Transcript
Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States
Worksheet Answer Key
THE JACKSON ERA
Table of Contents
CHAPTER-LEVEL ACTIVITIES:
What Do You Know? Opinionnaire ......................................... 2
Vocabulary Builder Activity................................................... 2
Hands-On Chapter Project: The Jackson Era ........................... 3
LESSON-LEVEL ACTIVITIES:
Guided Reading: Lesson 1 Jacksonian Democracy.................... 3
Guided Reading: Lesson 2 Conflicts Over Land ........................ 4
Guided Reading: Lesson 3 Jackson and the Bank..................... 5
Primary Source Activity: Lesson 1
Nullification.................................................................. 5
Geography and History Activity: Lesson 2
Movement: Native American Removal.............................. 6
21st Century Skills Activity: Lesson 3
Communication: Writing in Expository Style ..................... 7
Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies
Page 1
Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States
Worksheet Answer Key
THE JACKSON ERA
CHAPTER WORKSHEETS
What Do You Know? Opinionnaire
1-15. All student responses will vary. Students should be able to explain their
opinions.
Vocabulary Builder Activity
A. Content Vocabulary
1. nominating convention
2. plurality
3. vetoed
4. favorite son
5. mudslinging
6. bureaucracy
7. relocate
8. majority
9. spoils system
7. participation
8. symbol, facilitated
9. institutions, federal
10. survive
C. Combined Vocabulary Reinforcement
1. e
2. k
3. o
4. i
5. f
6. d
7. a
8. j
9. h
10. m
11. b
Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies
B. Academic Vocabulary
1. institutional
2. federalist
3. symbolic
4. facilitation
5. participation
6. survival
Page 2
Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States
Worksheet Answer Key
THE JACKSON ERA
12. g
13. l
14. n
15. c
Hands-On Chapter Project
The Jackson Era
Worksheet 1: Political Advertisement Project Plan
Political figure: Groups’ political figures will vary.
Election year: The election year will vary.
Task List: Students’ task lists vary but should be based on how the group decides to divide up the work.
Due Date: The due date will be assigned by the instructor.
Worksheet 2: Political Advertisement
Print advertisement plans will vary based on students’ political candidate.
Audio scripts will vary based on students’ political candidate.
Worksheet 3: Creating a Bibliography
Students’ sources should reflect their project and be formatted correctly.
LESSON WORKSHEETS
Guided Reading: Lesson 1 Jacksonian Democracy
New Parties Emerge
1. Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, William Crawford, and Henry Clay
2. Jackson won the plurality of a split vote. The Constitution provided that an election in which no candidate received a majority be decided by the House of Representatives. Adams received the majority of the votes in the House.
3. Henry Clay
4. Adams did not have a good relationship with Congress. As a result, he was not
very successful as a president, which set the stage for his defeat in 1828.
5. The National Republicans wanted a strong federal government; the Democrats
wanted a limited federal government and stronger exercise of states’ rights.
6. Both parties used mudslinging to paint their opponent negatively. Both parties
also used slogans, rallies, and buttons to stir up enthusiasm.
7. Students' answers may vary, but may include that people probably appreciated
Jackson's humble background, which made it seem possible that anyone could
become president. People also liked the fact that he was a war hero.
Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies
Worksheet 4: Assessment Rubric
Students’ self-assessment will be based on their opinions about their performance
during the project.
Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States
Worksheet Answer Key
THE JACKSON ERA
Jackson as President
8. False - People admired Jackson because he, was a patriot, a self-made man, and
a war hero, and seemed to understand the concerns of ordinary people.
9. False - Although Jackson believed in democracy and equality, his idea of “for all”
did not include women and non-whites.
10. True
11. False - The use of party nominating conventions allows more people to participate in the selection of candidates.
12. True
The Tariff Debate
The Northern manufacturers were for tariffs. Southerners and South Carolina were
against it.
Calhoun and South Carolina were for nullification. Jackson was against it.
Congress was for the Maysville Road Bill. Jackson was against it.
Guided Reading: Lesson 2 Conflicts Over Land
Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies
Removing Native Americans
1. Florida
2. Chickasaw; Choctaw; Creek; Cherokee; Seminole
3. These tribes had created successful farming communities that resembled other
American communities; they had adopted some aspects of American culture.
4. The white settlers wanted Native American land for farming and to expand their
communities.
5. It aided the federal government in the process of removing Native Americans from
their lands because the law allowed Jackson and the settlers to force the tribes
to move.
6. In treaties of the 1790s, the federal government had recognized the Cherokee as
a separate nation within the United States. The state of Georgia refused to honor
that treaty and accept the status of the Cherokee.
7. He did not agree with the Supreme Court's decision. He decided to ignore it and
continue his efforts to force the Cherokee to leave their lands and homes.
8. Native Americans were being forced to leave their lands and their homes. The
journey was long and very difficult. They were forced to go to a new "home"
where the land was different from what they had been farming, and they would
have to start over.
9. Answers will vary but should include that the Native Americans were being forced
to move, they were angry, they felt hopeless, defeated, and very sad. Out of the
15,000 Cherokee rounded up and forced to move, around 4,000 died, either
waiting for the move or on the trail.
Resistance and Removal
10. 3, 5, 4, 1, 7, 2, 6
Page 4
Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States
Worksheet Answer Key
THE JACKSON ERA
Guided Reading: Lesson 3 Jackson and the Bank
Jackson’s War Against the Bank
1. False - The Second Bank of the United States was a national bank run with permission of Congress by private bankers.
2. True
3. True
4. False - When the bill to renew the Bank’s charter came to Jackson to sign
5. True
6. True
7. False - The panic was partly caused by Jackson's veto that ended up closing the
federal bank and ending controls on state banks.
8. True
9. False - President Van Buren believed in the principle of laissez-faire—that government should interfere as little as possible in the nation’s economy.
10. True
Primary Source Activity: Lesson 1
Nullification
1. the U.S. Constitution
2. He is sure they cannot prove that the Constitution grants the right of the federal
government to impose the tariff.
3. Jackson's argument was that giving states the power to annul a federal law was in
conflict with the very idea and existence of the Union, and that the claim was expressly contradicted by the language of the Constitution. Jackson also argued
that nullification was completely inconsistent with the basic principles on which
the United States was formed: you can't create a union of states, with certain
principles and rules and structures, and then accept the principle that one state
can destroy that union.
Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies
The Whigs in Power
1. Jackson
2. log cabin
3. symbol
4. hero
5. Tippecanoe
6. John Tyler
7. Van Buren
8. Harrison
9. Democrat
10. Whigs
11. leaders
12. Cabinet
13. Whigs
14. Henry Clay
Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States
Worksheet Answer Key
THE JACKSON ERA
4. Jackson is afraid the result will be that the Union will be destroyed.
5. Calhoun says that power is shared between the states and the federal government. Therefore, states have the right to determine if the federal government has
overstepped its power. States also have the right to decide what action to take to
counteract the federal breach.
6. Calhoun had been a politician for many years so we can assume that people
would pay attention to what he said. His essay made a strong case for states’
rights. Giving the Exposition to the state legislature assured that they would talk
about it and use it to argue the case for states’ rights.
Geography and History Activity: Lesson 2
Movement: Native American Removal
1. It took them from their homes in the Southern and Eastern part of the United
States, westward through states such as Louisiana, Mississippi, and Missouri, to
the Indian Territory (in present-day Oklahoma).
2. Longest: Cherokee; Shortest: either the Chickasaw or the Choctaw
3. European Americans were moving south and east into Native American lands.
They wanted those lands for their farms and plantations. Most Native Americans
resisted being relocated, so the U.S. Army was ordered to relocate the Native
Americans by force, if necessary.
4. Chart answers:
Original home
Cherokee
North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama
Chickasaw
Mississippi
Choctaw
Mississippi
Creek
Alabama
Seminole
Florida
Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies
Group
5. As Americans pushed farther into the frontier in the South and East, they acquired
more property. Moving onto this land allowed settlers to increase the production
of cotton and other goods for export. Students may infer that the economic expansion, particularly in the South, was based on agriculture that required the
work of enslaved Africans. They may speculate that the removal of Native Americans took place at about the same time there was an increase in another group
of people who were forced to migrate, enslaved Africans.
Page 6
Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States
Worksheet Answer Key
THE JACKSON ERA
21st Century Skills Activity: Lesson 3
Communication: Writing in Expository Style
Learning the Skill
1. Answers will vary but should reflect any images used in the student’s sample.
2. Answers will vary but should list any repeated information, such as slogans and
the candidate’s name or other data, and explain that when information is repeated, it is more likely to be remembered. The repeated items are things the
candidate wants voters to remember.
3. Answers will vary but should list the facts found in the campaign information.
4. Answers will vary but should list any such information found in the campaign literature.
Practicing the Skill (Answers for Statements 1-3)
Statement: Answers will vary but should include a statement from the student’s
campaign literature.
Results of Research: Answers will vary but should include research results regarding the campaign statement.
Fact or opinion?: Answers will vary but should reflect student’s assessment of the
factual or nonfactual nature of the statement.
Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies
Applying the Skill
1. Answers will vary but should reflect the student’s assessment of the campaign
literature.
2. Answers will vary but should reflect any images used in the student’s campaign
literature.
3. Answers will vary but should include any slogan present in the student’s campaign literature.
4. Answers will vary but should reflect the presentation of any facts contained in the
student’s campaign literature.
5. Answers will vary but should reflect any opinions present in the student’s campaign literature.
6. Answers will vary but should reflect the presentation of any opinions contained in
the student’s campaign literature.
Page 7