Grade 8 Narrative Writing Rubric Download

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Grade 8 Narrative Writing Rubric Criteria for Writing Content Development Opening: the writer orients the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters (W8.3) Development: The writer uses narrative techniques such as dialog, description (of actions, thoughts, and feelings), and pacing, to develop experiences and events to show the response of characters to situations (W8.3) Structure & Organization Organization: the writer organizes an event sequence that unfolds naturally (W8.4) Transitions: The writer uses a variety of (temporal) transitional words, phrases, and clauses to signal event order/manage the sequence of events (W8.3) Conclusion: the writer provides a sense of closure that follows from the narrated experiences or events (W8.3) Emerging 1 Progressing 2 Mastering Expectations 3 Exceeding Expectations 4 Beginning not only sets the plot/story in motion, but also hints at the larger meaning that the story conveys. Beginning also sets up the problem, sets the stage for the lesson that would be learned, and/or shows how the character relates to the setting in a way that matters in the story. Realistic characters are developed through the use of details, action, dialog, and internal thinking. The character development contributes to the deeper meaning of the story. Story also includes tension and resolution to convey an idea, lesson, or theme. Beginning sets the story in motion, and also grounds it in a place or situation. Includes details that are later be important to the story. These details may point to the central issue or conflict, show how the story elements connect, or hint at key character traits. Beginning establishes the situation and place, hinting at a bigger context for the story (revealing issues that have been brewing, showing how the setting affects the character, contextualizing a time in history, developing one out of many points of view). Beginning establishes a situation, place, and/or atmosphere; foreshadowing the problem(s), and hinting at questions, issues, ideas, or themes. Narrative voice and point of view is introduced. Action, dialog, details, and inner thinking is developed to convey an issue, idea, lesson, or theme through character tension and change. Central character is shown to be specific and realistic. The setting and the characters’ relationship to the setting is developed. Well-­‐developed characters evolve/change over the course of the story. Story is used to focus on an issue/theme, teach a lesson and/or develop a point of view. Story elements are complicated (i.e., character’s thinking may be contrasted with his/her actions and dialog). Central character’s relationships to other characters are developed. Character flaws as well as strengths add to the complexity of the story. Details are used to convey meaning and/or develop a lesson or theme. Characters are developed across scenes, offering insight into their troubles, hopes, relationships, and giving clues as to how they change. Characters are portrayed with flaws, strengths, and aspects that make them unique or worthy of attention. Details are used to add tension, to convey meaning, or develop a lesson or theme. Setting is also developed to create mood and enhance meaning. Paragraphs are used purposefully, often to show time and setting changes, new parts of the story, or to create suspense for readers. There is a logical, clear sequence of events. A traditional, or slightly modified, story structure (rising action, conflict/climax, falling action) is used to bring out the meaning of the story and to reach the audience. A modified traditional story structure has been used. Time is dealt with in purposeful ways, to best suit the genre, to bring out the meaning of the story, and to reach the audience. Transitional phrases and clauses are used not only to signal complicated changes in time, but are also used to alert readers to changes in the setting, tone, mood, point of view (e.g., suddenly, unlike before, if only she had known). Transitional phrases and clauses are used to connect what happened to why it happened (If he hadn’t…he might not have, because of, although, little did she know that). Ending connects to what the story is really about. Reader gains a sense of closure by showing a new realization, insight, or change in the character/narrator. Dialog, action, inner thinking, or small actions of the character are used to achieve this. Closure is achieved by showing clearly how the character or place changed or the problem was resolved. If there is no resolution, details leave the reader thinking about a central idea of theme. 8
Adapted story structures and literary traditions (e.g., quest structure, coming of age, cautionary tale) are used to fit the story, meaning, genre, audience. Multiple plot lines, flash-­‐forwards or flashbacks are dealt with purposefully. Transitional phrases and clauses, Transitional phrases and clauses, and grammatical structures (paragraphing, grammatical structures are used to descriptive phrases, and clauses) and demonstrate the passage of time, or to text structures (chapter divisions, connect parts of the story, to imply extended italics) to alert the reader to cause and effect, to raise questions, changes in the setting, mood, point of and/or make allusions (e.g., long view, or time in the story. before, as when, just as, without realizing, even afterward). Closure is achieved by revealing Closure is provided by: returning to a character changes that follow from theme, and/or revealing how events, or by a resolution of the characters change or make a change. If problem. If there is no resolution, no resolution, there is a connection to closure is achieved by showing how a larger issue or mood that may add to characters are affected by events, and the meaning of the entire story or circling back to the central idea, issue, suggest a social commentary. or theme. Grade Narrative Writing Rubric May 2015 Adapted from rubrics created by David Pook and by the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project Grade 8 Narrative Writing Rubric Criteria for Writing Clarity & Conventions Mechanics: the writer demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, spelling, and punctuation (L8.2) Grammar: the writer demonstrates command of standard English grammar and usage (L8.1) Sentence Structure: the writer demonstrates knowledge of sentence construction (L8.1) Word Choice: the use of rich, colorful, precise language for function and for effect. (L8.3, L8.5, L8.6) Tone: the writer establishes tone appropriate to the text type and genre (W8.1d) Emerging 1 Progressing 2 Mastering Expectations 3 Exceeding Expectations 4 All Tier II and domain-­‐specific words are spelled correctly. Punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes, semicolons) used to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements. All Tier II and domain-­‐specific words are spelled correctly. Dialog sections are punctuated correctly. All Tier II and domain-­‐specific words are spelled correctly. Commas are used to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but not He wore an old [,] green shirt). Pronouns used are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive). Intensive pronouns such as myself, ourselves are used for emphasis. Pronouns used are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive). Intensive pronouns such as myself, ourselves are used for emphasis. Consistent use of varied sentence structure. Varied sentence structure (simple and complex) used consistently to highlight meaning. Phrases and clauses are placed within sentences. There are no dangling modifiers. Use of verb tenses that shift as needed (as in moving from a flashback to the present tense of the story). Different sentence structures used to achieve different purposes throughout the piece. Text has been proofread to identify and correct misused homonyms and technologically created mishaps. Punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) is used to indicate a pause or break. Ellipsis is also used to indicate an omission. The use of active and passive voice is used appropriately. Use of indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood is correct and appropriate. Precise descriptions, figurative language, and an attempt at symbolism are employed. Language fits the story’s meaning and context (e.g., different characters use different kinds of language). All vocabulary is intentional and relevant to the story. Uses specific details and figurative language to help the reader understand the place and the mood (making an object or a place symbolic, using the weather, using repetition). Tone is varied to match the variety of emotions experienced by the characters of the story. A combination of the narrator’s point of view, setting descriptions, and internal thinking of characters sets the tone. Use of sentence fragments and dialect are appropriate to the genre, purpose, and context within the story. Symbolism is used to connect with theme/s of the story. Symbolism and metaphor is used for subtle as well as obvious connections to a theme. Judicious use of active and passive voice. The pace and tone are varied to develop tension and/or develop different perspectives across the text. 8
Grade Narrative Writing Rubric May 2015 Adapted from rubrics created by David Pook and by the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project 
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