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AMERICAN COMMITTEE ON THE HISTORY
OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR
NEWSLETTER
Arthur L. Funk, Chairman
Professor Emeritus of History
University of Florida
:)445 N.W. 30th Boulevard
Gainesville, Florida 32605
Permanent Directors
Charles F. Delzell
Vanderbilt University
ISBN 0-89126-060-9
--~--
Terms expiring 1988
John Lewis Gaddis
Ohio University
Robin Higham
Kansas State University
D. Clayton James
Mississippi State University
Agnes F. Peterson
Hoover [n8titution
Brig. Gen. Edwin H. Simmons
Marine Corps History and
Museums
David F. Trask
Center of Military History
Russell F. Weigley
Temple University
---
-
Spring 1988
No. 39
CONTENTS
University of California
atBan Diego
Brig. Gen James L Collins, Jr.
Chief of Military History (ret.)
-
ISSN 0885-5668
H. Stuart Hughes
Forrest C. Pogue
Dwight D. Eisenhower Institute
Donald S. Detwiler, Secretary
and Newsletter Editor
Department of History
Southern Illinois University
at Carbondale
Carbondale, Illinois 62901
Robin Higham, Archivist
Department of History
Kansas State University
Manhattan, Kansas 66506
International Book
Review Coordination:
General Information
2
The Newsletter
2
The ACHSWW is affiliated with:
Membership
2
American Historical Association
400 A Street, S.E.
Washington, D.C. 20003
Committee Elections
3
The 1987 Annual Meeting
The Business Meeting
The Joint Session: "Europe under
the German Occupation".
3
Arthur L. Funk
3445 N.W. 30th Boulevard
Gainesville, ~'Iorida 32605
Comite International
d'Histoire de la Deuxieme
Guerre Mondiale
A. Harry Paape, Secretary
General and Treasurer
Netherlands State Institute
for War Documentation
Herengracht 474
1017 CA Amsterdam
The Netherlands
5
Second Soviet-American Symposium on U.S.-Soviet Rela­
tions and the History of World War II (October 1987)
7
Session on the War in the Far East at the 1988 Meeting
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Terms e.l:piring 1989
Martin Blumenson
Washington, D.C.
William H. Cunliffe
National Archives
Stanley L. Falk
Center of Military History (ret.)
Maurice MaUoff
Center of Military History (reU
Ernest R. May
Harvard University
Ronald H. Spector
Naval Historical Center
Gerhard L. Weinberg
University of North Carolina
Earl F. Ziemke
University of Georgia
Terms expiring 1990
Dean C. Allard
Naval Historical Center
Stephen E. Ambrose
University of New Orleans
Harold C. Deutsch
Army War College and
University of Minnesota (emer.)
David Kahn
Great Neck, N.Y.
Warren F. Kimball
Rutgers University
Telford Taylor
New York City
Robet1 Wolfe
National Archives
Janet Ziegler
University of California
at Los Angeles
News and Announcements
USAF Historical Research Center Research Grants
Air Force Academy Symposium on the History of
Intelligence (October 1988)
Call for Papers: American Military Institute
Conference at VMI (April 1989)
Call for Papers:
Siena College Conference on World
War II--a Fifty-Year Perspective (June 1989)
A New Publication: "World War II Investigator"
Eisenhower Library Conference on Women in War,
Politics, and Government: 1942-1960 (October 1988)
Individual Appointments
Research Resources: The OSS Records (A Special Report)
Correspondence with the Archivist of the United States
"oss Records at the National Archives" by Lawrence
H. McDonald, National Archives
Appendix 1: Record Group 226, Entries 1-86 (OSS Re­
search and Analysis Branch Records)
Appendix 2: Record Group 226, Entries 87-190 (the
OSS Operational Archives)
Selected OSS Operational Archives Folder Descriptions
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GENERAL INFORMATION
Established in 1967 "to promote historical research in the
period of World War II in all its aspects," the American
Committee on the History of the Second World War is a private
organization supported by the dues and donations of its mem­
bers. It is affiliated with the American Historical Associa­
tion, with the International Committee for the History of the
Second World War, and with corresponding national committees
in other countries, including Austria, Belgium, Canada,
France, East and West Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Po­
land, Romania, the Soviet Union, Spain, and the United King­
dom. The ACHSWW meets annually with the American Historical
Association.
THE NEWSLETTER
The ACHSWW issues a semiannual newsletter (assigned Interna­
tional Standard Serial Number [ISSN] 0885-5668 by the Nation­
al Serial Data Program of the Library of Congress). Back is­
sues of the newsletter are 'available through the ACHSWW Ar­
chivist (at the address on the letterhead) from MA/AH Publish­
ing (now an imprint of Sunflower University Press). The
first eighteen issues (1968-1978) are available as a spiral­
bound, 360-page xerox paperback (ISBN 0-89126-060-9) for
$36.00.
Subsequent back numbers are available as single, un­
bound issues for $3.00 each.
(There is no postal charge for
prepaid orders to U.S. addresses; there is a $4.00 shipping
charge for orders to foreign and Canadian addresses.)
MEMBERSHIP
Membership in the ACHSWW is open to anyone interested in the
era of the Second World War. Annual membership dues of
$10.00 are payable at the beginning of each calendar year.
(Students with U.S. addresses may, if their circumstances
require it, pay annual dues of $2.00 for up to six years.)
There is no surcharge for members abroad, but it is requested
that dues be remitted directly to the secretary of the commit­
tee (not through an agency or a subscription service) in U.S.
dollars.
(The newsletter, which is mailed at bulk rates with­
in the United States, will be sent by surface mail to foreign
addresses unless special arrangements are made to cover the
cost of airmail postage.) A membership renewal form is regu­
larly attached to the fall newsletter.
2
COMMITTEE ELECTIONS
The chairman of the committee, the secretary, and the eight
directors listed in the lower left-hand margin of the first
page of this newsletter were elected to three-year terms from
January 1988 through December 1990.
THE 1987 ANNUAL MEETING
The annual meeting of the ACHSWW was held in 1987 in conjunc­
tion with that of the American Historical Association at the
Sheraton Washington Hotel, 2660 Woodley Road, N.W., Washing­
ton, D.C. 20008, 28-30 December 1987.
The Business Meeting
The 1987 business meeting was convened shortly after 5:00
p.m., Monday, 28 December 1987, in the Wisconsin Room of the
Sheraton Washington Hotel, by the committee chairman, Prof.
Arthur L. Funk of the University of Florida. The secretary
and newsletter editor, Prof. Donald S. Detwiler, Southern
Illinois University at Carbondale, gave the treasurer's re­
port, which was unanimously accepted, as was his recommenda­
tion that student dues of two dollars annually be limited to
six years.
An announcement was made regarding the joint session of
the ACHSWW with the AHA, scheduled for Wednesday, 30 Decem­
er: Director A. Harry Paape of the Netherlands State Insti­
tute for War Documentation, who was to have given a paper on
Anne Frank and her diary, would unfortunately not be able to
participate. His place on the panel would be taken by Prof.
Funk.
Chancellor Alfred F. Hurley of the University of North
Texas reported on plans for the 1988 joint session to be held
at the annual meeting during the last week of December in
Cincinnati. Plans were being developed for a session on air
power in the Second World War in the Far East, with a paper
by the author of a recent study on Chennault and with a con­
tribution, if possible, by Prof. Alvin D. Coox of San Diego
State University, on the Japanese perspective.
(As noted
elsewhere in this newsletter, the AHA Program Committee has
meanwhile approved the proposed joint session.)
The committee chairman mentioned that the annual meeting
in December 1989 is to be held in San Francisco, and there
was a preliminary discussion of possible approaches in plan­
ning a session appropriate for the fiftieth anniversary of
the beginning of the war in Europe.
Turning to the activities of the International Committee
on the History of the Second World War, Prof. Arthur Funk (a
vice president of that body), reported on the resignation of
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the Belgian historian Jean Vanwelkenhuyzen from the presiden­
cy of the committee, noting that the circumstances that had
constrained him to resign had also prevented him from repre­
senting the International Committee at an important planning
meeting of the executive committee for the International Con­
gress of Historical Sciences in summer 1990 in Madrid. It
had been suggested by the secretary general and treasurer of
the international committee, A. Harry Paape, that the Norwe­
gian historian Prof. Magne Skodvin, Oslo, be named interim
president to serve until the 1990 meeting in Madrid. Prof.
Funk said that he and Sir F. William Deakin, as vice presi­
dents of the international committee, had concurred with this
proposal, but that formal action had not yet been taken. Pro­
fessor Funk also discussed plans being made for the program
of the 1990 International Congress of Historical Sciences,
mentioned above, and reported on the new Normandy Museum,
soon to be dedicated at Caen.
(The U.S. Committee for the
Battle of Normandy Museum is advised by a Board of Histori­
ans, of which Prof. Funk is secretary, and on which a dozen
ACHSWW directors serve, including Brig. Gen. James L. Collins,
Jr., as the board's chairman.
Prof. Gerhard Weinberg of the University of North Caro­
lina, Chapel Hill, reported on the response of the National
Security Agency (NSA) to the request he had made, with the
support of a resolution passed at the ACHSWW meeting in 1986,
that the NSA review for declassification the German cryptolog­
ic materials that were captured at the end of the war and that
have not yet been made available for research. The National
Security Agency has during the past few years already re­
leased a substantial body of cryptologic documentation repre­
senting Axis messages that were intercepted and decrypted by
the Allies, i.e., the British and Americans. The declassifi­
cation of this material has revealed that the Allied leaders
had far more information about Axis operations and plans than
was previously realized by all but an extremely limited cir­
cle. The material now in question, the captured German cryp­
tologic records, should reveal what Allied traffic the Ger­
mans succeded in intercepting and decrypting--and may thereby
offer new insight into German plans and operations.
In response to his initiative, Prof. Weinberg was in­
formed that the National Security Agency is in the process of
declassifying one shipment of records, which should, in the
near future, be transferred to the National Archives.
In ad­
dition, a second shipment is also to be processed and trans­
ferred to the National Archives. Finally, the agency in­
formed Prof. Weinberg, a number of cryptographic files, from
other sources than the bulk of records held in joint British­
American custody, would be released along with the latter (al­
though they would not be separately identified).
Prof. Weinberg stated his appreciation of the progress
that the release of these records represents. He mentioned
that the committee newsletter has periodically carried useful
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listings of the NSA Cryptologic Documents transferred to the
National Archives and deposited with Record Group 457 in the
Military Reference Branch, and trusted that the arrival of
this new material would also be reported to the membership.
[Newsletter Editor's Note: While drafting this (in the
third week of May) I telephoned the archivist specializing in
these holdings at the Military Reference Branch of the Nation­
al Archives, Mr. John Taylor (202: 523-3340). He said some
of the new NSA material has come in, but he understands a
good deal more of it is due to arrive soon. By the end of
the summer, he hopes to receive a new cumulative inventory of
cryptologic accessions from NSA, suitable for reproduction in
the fall issue of the ACHSWW newsletter.]
Mr. Robert Wolfe, an ACHSWW Director and Assistant Di­
rector of the Military Archives Division, introduced his col­
league at the National Archives, Dr. Lawrence H. McDonald of
the Military Projects Branch, who spoke of his work on the
OSS Records Project, on which he is working with a group of
nine volunteers. (The substance of his presentation, together
with a listing of the OSS records and selections from the
finding aids being developed in connection with the project,
is included in this newsletter.)
At the conclusion of Dr. McDonald's very well received
presentation and the questions, answers, and discussion that
followed it, the committee unanimously resolved that the com­
mittee, through its chairman, should write to the Archivist
of the United states, Dr. Don W. Wilson, expressing apprecia­
tion for and interest in the OSS Records Project, and should
urge him to have a preliminary inventory of OSS Records pre­
pared and published by the National Archives. (For the cor­
respondence between Prof. Funk and Dr. Wilson, see below.)
Prof. Funk spoke on the Second Soviet-American Symposi­
um on U.S.-Soviet Relations and the History of World War II,
in which he had participated at the Roosevelt Library at Hyde
Park, N.Y., in October 1987.
(See also the report of the
chairman of U.S. group, Prof. Warren Kimball of Rutgers
University at Newark, which is summarized below.)
The meeting was adjourned shortly before 7:00 p.m.
The Joint Session: Europe under the German Occupation
The AHA-ACHSWW joint session was held on Wednesday, 30
December 1987, 1 :00-3:00 p.m., under the chairmanship of Prof.
Donald S. Detwiler, Southern Illinois University, in Atrium 4
of the Sheraton Washington, in honor of the late founding
president of the international committee, Henri Michel, on
"Europe under the German Occupation." Papers were given by
Prof. Margaret L. Rossiter of Eastern Michigan University,
author of Women in the Resistance (New York: Praeger, 1986),
on "The Role of Women in the French Resistance," and by Prof.
John F. Sweets of the University of Kansas, author of Choices
in Vichy France (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986), on
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"Police and People under Vichy France: A Case Study in Duty
and Loyalty." Director Harry A. Paape of the Netherlands
State Institute for War Documentation was unfortunately not
able to attend and give his scheduled paper on "Anne Frank
and Her Diary." His place on the panel was taken by Prof.
Arthur L. Funk, University of Florida, who spoke on Henri
Michel, stressing his role as an historian of the war and
the Resistance.
The Washington historian Martin Blumenson began his com­
ment with a tribute to Henri Michel, and then, before turning
to individual issues raised in the two papers, made several
general observations regarding the German occupation and the
anti-German resistance.
"Mr. Henri Michel," he said, "laid much of the groundwork
and established much of the framework for the study of World
War II. He did so in three ways: by writing his magisterial
historical works, by setting up and putting into place a mag­
nificent archival collection system, and by guiding the organ­
ization and proceedings of an international body of scholars.
He sought to impose no boundaries on inquiry and knowledge.
To my mind, all of us working on World War II are following
in Henri Michel's footsteps. We are amplifying and fleshing
out his explorations. This seems to be our function in our
session this afternoon.
"The excellent papers, in their individual manners, make
clear the difficulties Europeans had to live with and to sur­
vive in countries occupied by the Germans and administered by
the Nazis. Defeat and occupation required the inhabitants to
make substantial adjustments and accommodations to an entire­
ly new way of life.
liThe difference, or at least one difference, between san­
ity and insanity is the ability to deal with reality. Reali­
ty for many Europeans in 1940--even earlier in some places,
for example, in Czechoslovakia--was the presence of Germans,
military and civilian, in their midst. The military in their
uniforms were more visible, but all personified not only the
power of the German state but also the intent to impose a new
system, a new order on Europe. People grumbled, but this was
the reality, and at first everyone, or almost everyone, ac­
cepted the new circumstances and sought to conform to the new
conditions.
"It seems to me that recovery from the shock of defeat
was the first reaction of conquered and overrun people and
that an attempt to recognize and live with the occupation was
the second.
In the early days, I believe that the effort to
accommodate to the occupation was labeled patritism. Love of
country meant preserving something that was left of the enti­
ty, of national feeling, of cultural bonds, all in the face
of foreign domination.
"Patriotism later changed, at least for some, perhaps
for most people. The Germans did not know how to occupy, and
their early desire to be 'correct' toward the occupied popula­
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tions, a policy that I think was generally successful, dis­
solved as the quality of life disintegrated. The curfews,
the rationing, the regulations, the passes, the permissions,
the censorship, the surveillance, the repression, the punish­
ment, the executions, all grated on the soul. But most of
all, the shortages of food, clothing, and fuel made existence
virtually impossible, then unbearable. The continued deten­
tion of prisoners of war and the forced labor of young people
added to families' burdens. And finally, as a consequence,
the German presence became intolerable. Their parades, their
band concerts, their tourists were objects of scorn. Patriot­
ism became the wish to be rid of the Germans.
"Contributing to the changing climate of opinion was, of
course, the Resistance, the underground movement throughout
occupied Europe. From my study, the initial Resistance peo­
ple were, as a general rule, intellectuals. They understood
better than others the meaning of Nazism, the prohibition of
free academic enquiry, the false assumptions of racism, the
drive to restrict individualism and to outlaw thought. And
so the victims rebelled, in secret, of course.
"The Resistance did many things to challenge the occu­
pation--intelligence gathering, sabotage, rescuing Allied
fliers, escorting Allied agents, harassing the Germans and
troubling their security. But to my mind the most important
function was changing public opinion, from an attempt to live
with the Germans to an unwillingness to do so . . . . "
The commentator discussed, in connection with specific
questions raised in the two papers, how the activities of the
Resistance contributed to a fundamental change in the atmos­
phere of occupied Europe.
"Finally," he said, "we must not
forget the course of the war itself. As the struggle between
regular armed forces continued, the Nazi victory seemed in­
creasingly in doubt. This, plus the degraded living condi­
tions and the opposition sponsored by the Resistance, eventu­
ally decided the outcome of the occupation."
SECOND SOVIET-AMERICAN SYMPOSIUM ON U.S.-USSR RELATIONS AND
THE HISTORY OF WORLD WAR II
Following the meeting in Moscow in October 1986, of which an
account was given in the fall 1987 issue of this newsletter,
a second Soviet-American symposium on the war and Soviet-Amer­
ican relations was held 20-23 October 1987 at the Roosevelt
Library in Hyde Park, N.Y.
(Prof. Funk, as a participant, re­
ported on this symposium at the 1987 ACHSWW business meeting,
as noted above). The second symposium focussed on the period
mid-1942 through autumn 1943 and on topics ranging from mili­
tary events on the Russian front to images of the Soviet Un­
ion in the American media.
In his report, the head of the
American group, Prof. Warren Kimball, Rutgers, wrote:
"Once again, we were a bit disappointed at the relative
failure of the Soviet papers to analyze and question Soviet
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policy. Soviet historians continued to display a rally
'round the flag' approach during public forums.
Private con­
versations occasionally brought out criticisms of Soviet poli­
cies, but that is hardly a substitute for open scholarly de­
bate. One good sign was that Soviet historians, when con­
fronted with a hard question about Soviet policy formulation,
this time often countered with the admission that they could
not answer since they had no access to the archives. How­
ever, no such statements appeared in their formal papers.
Nevertheless, we did encounter repeated indications that
Soviet historians were thinking about those kinds of issues.
liThe most striking evidence of such thinking came when
the Soviets requested a change in the schedule in order to
present a discussion of perestroika as it affected the study
of history. Although we now realize that such displays of
glas'nost have, in the last year, become de rigueur at Soviet­
American academic conferences, that does not lessen their im­
pact or diminish our hopes that these words will be translat­
ed into reality.
(The quotes and notes that follow are taken
largely from the summary of the conference submitted by our
excellent rapporteur, Ed Bennett.) One senior Soviet histor­
ian said 'we are trying to examine the white [blank?] spots
in Soviet history.'
He went on to claim that the archives
are more open and that they are trying to make more documen­
tary material available.
II
•
Another Soviet historian told of once being
forced to excise a statement he wrote arguing that Khrushchev
had tried to improve Soviet-American relations. He criti­
cized that as the sort of thing that should not happen. A
senior Soviet historian said that they are very defensive
about the events of 1939 . . . • A number of younger Soviet
historians addressed the very real problem of reshaping atti­
tudes and coming to grips with change; a difficult task, they
said, for bureaucrats.
lilt was the unanimous opinion of the Americans present
that the Soviet historians honestly believed that major chang­
es were in the making.
For a group of prestigious Soviet his­
torians to admit or even infer that much of what they had
written was incomplete and even wrong, that their work was
based on inadequate access to their archives, and subject to
political censorship, is remarkable.
"A Soviet decision to publish in the Soviet Union many
of the American papers from the first symposium may also be a
glimmer of glas'nost.
In addition, a number of those papers,
both Soviet and U.S., will be published in the United States
sometime in 1989.
liThe third symposium, which will deal with the conferenc­
es at Moscow, Cairo, and Teheran (to the eve of the Normandy
invasion), is scheduled for the Soviet Union sometime in Octo­
ber 1988. As before, we will concentrate on broad issues of
Soviet-American relations and Soviet-American perceptions of
each other • . . • " (For the full text of Prof. Kimball's re­
port, see Perspectives, the newsletter of the American Histor­
ical Association, May/June 1988 [vol. 26, no. 5], pp. 11-12.)
SESSION ON WORLD WAR II IN THE FAR EAST AT THE 1988 MEETING
The Program Committee of the American Historical Association
has approved the ACHSWW's proposal for the following joint
session at the 1988 annual meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio:
WORLD WAR II IN THE FAR EAST:
CHENNAULT, CHINA, AND AIR POWER
Joint Session with the American Committee
on the History of the Second World War
Chair:
Alfred F. Hurley, University of North Texas
Chennault and China,
Martha Byrd, Davidson, North Carolina
Japanese Air Power in the China War,
Alvin D. Coox, San Diego State University
Comment:
Michael Schaller, University of Arizona
Alfred F. Hurley, University of North Texas
The joint session will be opened by the chairman, Dr.
Alfred F. Hurley, Professor of History and Chancellor, Univer­
sity of North Texas. The first paper will be by Ms. Martha
Byrd, whose Chennault: Giving Wings to the Tiger was pub­
lished in 1987 by the University of Alabama Press. Her paper
will provide an account of Chennault's work in China from his
arrival, on the eve of the Sino-Japanese War, as a retired
U.S. Army captain hired as an aviation consultant by the Chi­
nese government, to his retirement, shortly before the end of
World War II, as Chief of Air Staff to Generalissimo Chiang
Kai-shek and an American major general commanding the USAAF's
Fourteenth Air Force.
During the intervening years, he had
played a key role in developing the Chinese Air Force, had or­
ganized and led the American Volunteer Group (the "Flying Ti­
gers"), and had build up and deployed U.S. air power in China,
commanding far more resources than his theater commander or
the War Department had wanted to allocate, thanks largely to
the personal support he enjoyed on the part of both Chiang
and Roosevelt. This paper will also note that after the war
Chennault returned to China and established a commercial air
transport company which was active during the Chinese Civil
War and, after its acquisition by the CIA, in other Asian
conflicts.
Dr. Alvin D. Coox' paper, on Japanese Air Power in the
Sino-Japanese War, will complement Ms. Byrd's paper, which,
by telling the story of Chennault's wartime career, will also
provide an account of Chinese and American air power in the
China Theater. Dr. Coox is Professor of History and Director
of the Center for Asian Studies at San Diego State University
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and author of a widely recognized series of books and arti­
cles on Japanese military and aviation history and the World
War II era, including a work reviewed in the last issue of
this newsletter, Nomonhan: Japan against Russia, 1939, 2 vols.
(Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1985), and "The
Rise and Fall of the Imperial Japanese Air Forces," in Air
Power and Warfare, edited by Alfred F. Hurley and Robert C.
Ehrhart (Washington, D.C.: Office of Air Force History and
U.s. Air Force Academy, 1979). In his paper, Prof. Coox will
be able not only to explain the role of air power in Japanese
theory and practice during the Sino-Japanese War, but also to
discuss the impact of Chinese and American air warfare on the
Japanese in the China Theater, with particular consideration-­
in connection with Ms. Byrd's presentation--of the role of
Chennault.
The first commentator will be Dr. Michael Schaller, Pro­
fessor and Head of the Department of History at the University
of Arizona, author of The U.S. Crusade in China, 1938-1945
(New York: Columbia University Press, 1975). As an authority
on Sino-American relations during World War II, he will com­
ment on the political and diplomatic implications of the is­
sues raised in the two papers, including Chennault's contro­
versial role in the development and implementation of U.S.
strategy regarding China during the war.
Prof. Hurley, in his comments on the two papers, will fo­
cus on the military question of the role of air power in the
China Theater, comparing and contrasting its employment by
the Chinese, the Americans, and the Japanese. He will con­
clude the session with observations on the significance of
air power in Asia and the Pacific during the Second World War
and the historical implications.
NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
U.S. Air Force Historical Research Center Research Grants
The USAF Historical Research Center (USAFHRC) announces re­
search grants to encourage scholars to study the history of
air power through the use of the USAF historical document col­
lection at the center. The center will make several awards
up to $2,500 each to individuals who meet the criteria in
this announcement and are willing to visit the center for re­
search during fiscal year 1989 (ending 30 September 1989).
Recipients will be designated "Research Associates of the
USAF Historical Research Center."
Criteria.--Applicants must have a graduate degree in his­
tory or related fields, or equivalent scholarly achievements.
Their specialty or professional experience must be in aeronau­
tics, astronautics, or military related subjects. They must
11
not be in residence at Maxwell AFB, Alabama, and be willing
to visit the USAF Historical Research Center at Maxwell for
a sufficient time to use the research materials at the cen­
ter for their proposed projects.
Topics of Research.--Proposed topics of research may
include, but are not restricted to, Air Force history, mili­
tary operations, education, training, administration, stra­
tegy, tactics, logistics, weaponry, technology, organization,
policy, activities, and institutions.
Broader subjects suit­
able for a grant include military history, civil-military re­
lations, history of aeronautics or astronautics, relations
among the U.S. branches of service, military biographies, and
international military relations.
Preference will be given
to those proposals that involve the use of primary sources
held at the center. Proposals for research of classified sub­
jects cannot be considered for research grants. As a general
rule, records before 1955 are largely unclassified, while
many later records remain classified. Examples of classified
subjects include nuclear weapons and war planning, weapon sys­
tems now in the Air Force inventory, and Air Force operations
during the Vietnam War.
Application Deadline.--Applicants can request an applica­
tion from the Director, USAF Historical Research Center, Max­
well AFB, Ala. 36112-6678. They must return the completed ap­
plications by 31 December 1988.
Air Force Academy Symposium (October 1988)
"The Intelligence Revolution: A Historical Perspective," a
symposium sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Academy, is sched­
uled for 12-14 October 1988. For information, contact Mark
A. Clodfelter, Department of History, U.S. Air Force Academy,
Colorado Springs, Colo. 80830-5701.
Call for Papers: American Military Institute (April 1989)
The Virginia Military Institute's Department of History and
Politics will host the annual meeting of the American Mili­
tary Institute on 14-15 April 1989 in Lexington, Va. The
conference theme is "Military Education and Thought." Pa­
pers that treat the establishment of formal military educa­
tion, the creation of academies and service schools, or the
formulation and institutionalization of military doctrine
through military education are invited.
Papers may focus on
any nation or period of history.
Please send proposals be­
fore 31 October 1988 to: Prof. Henry S. Bausum, AMI Confer­
ence Coordinator, Department of History and Politics, VMI,
Lexington, Va. 24450.
Call for Papers: Conference at Siena College (June 1989)
On 1-2 June 1989 Siena College is sponsoring the fourth in a
series of annual multidisciplinary conferences. The subject
of the 1989 conference will be "World War II--A Fifty-Year
Perspective." The focus will be on 1939, but papers dealing
with broad issues of earlier years will be welcome. Welcome
topics include, but are not limited to, Fascism and National
Socialism, the war in Asia, Spain, literature, art, film, di­
plomatic, political, and military history, popular culture,
and women's and Jewish studies dealing with the era. Post­
Munich Europe, Danzig, the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact, etc.,
would be particularly appropriate.
Please direct proposals
or inquiries to Prof. Thomas O. Kelly, II, Department of His­
tory, Siena College, Loudonville, N.Y. 12211.
A New Publication on the Second World War
An announcement has been received of a new English periodical,
World War II Investigator. A monthly, it was scheduled to be­
gin publication in March 1988. Its purpose is to deal with
the whole war in all of its aspects, focusing on questions,
events, persons, organizations, etc., that have been over­
looked or ne-glected in the general literature. Articles of
between one and three thousand words will be commissioned and
authors paid. Those interested in becoming subscribers or
contributers should write to World War II Investigator, 68
Staines Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW3 3LF, England.
Eisenhower Library Conference
The Eisenhower Library is sponsoring a conference on "Women
in War, Politics, and Government: 1942-1960" at the library
in Abiline, Kansas, on 20-21 October 1988. For information,
write to the Director, Dwight D. Eisenhower Library, Abiline,
Kansas 67410.
Individual Appointments
Dr. Carl Boyd, currently on leave of absence as Professor of
History from Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, is
Visiting Scholar for two years (1987-89) at the U.S. Army Cen­
ter of Military History, Washington, D.C. His research deals
with "Magic" and the European Theater during World War II.
Prof. Warren F. Kimball of Rutgers University at Newark has
been named the 1988-89 Pitt Professor of American History and
Institutions at the University of Cambridge, England.
Estab­
lished forty-four years ago, the professorship was named for
the eighteenth-century British statesman William Pitt.
12
RESEARCH RESOURCES:
The OSS Records at the National Archives
As noted in the report on the 1987 business meeting, the com­
mittee, after hearing a presentation on the OSS Records Proj­
ect at the National Archives, resolved to recommend to the Ar­
chivist of the United States that a preliminary inventory of
the OSS records be prepared and published.
On 22 January 1988, the chairman of the ACHSWW, Prof.
Arthur L. Funk, writing on behalf of the committee, congratu­
lated Dr. Don W. Wilson on his recent appointment as Archiv­
ist of the United States, noted the long record of coopera­
tion between the committee and the National Archives, going
back to the joint sponsorship of a conference in the early
1970s, and then turned to the OSS records.
"Recently, at the AHA meeting in Washington," he wrote,
"Mr. [Robert] Wolfe arranged for a presentation, by Mr. Larry
McDonald, on the status of the OSS records which have in the
last few years been transferred from CIA. Mr. McDonald point­
ed out that since 1980 the Archives have accessioned some
3,000 cubic feet of OSS records, and by now, with the help of
talented volunteers, are providing finding aids, including
excellent descriptive lists of some of the material.
"The members of our Committee who were present at Mr.
McDonald's exposition were very much impressed by the quality
of the work he has been doing, and also by the enormous
amount of new research material available to historians. It
was unanimously resolved by our Committee that we should urge
you to give as much publicity as possible to these materials,
preferably a printed handout or brochure or pamphlet which
would disseminate to the historical profession information
about the availability of this invaluable resource."
On 25 February 1988, Dr. Wilson responded to Prof. Funk:
"Thank you for your congratulatory letter on the occa­
sion of my inauguration as seventh Archivist of the United
States. My thanks, also, for your praise of the work of
Lawrence McDonald, our volunteers, and other members of our
staff in preparing the massive accession of historically valu­
able OSS records for researcher use.
"We will consider publishing an inventory to the OSS rec­
ords as soon as the bulk of those records have been trans­
ferred to the National Archives. At present we are uncertain
of the ultimate dimensions of that record group. Furthermore,
because the CIA and other agencies continued to use OSS rec­
ords well into the 1950's, the arrangement of the records suf­
fered.
A good deal of sophisticated archival processing will
be required to prepare an inventory suitable for publication.
"Meanwhile, the computer-indexed folder title lists are
available to researchers here and can be mailed to anyone who
requests them."
For those unable to attend the meeting at which he made
his presentation, Dr. McDonald, at the invitation of the edi­
tor, kindly agreed to provide the following introduction and
supporting material for reproduction in this newsletter.
13
OSS Records at the National Archives
by
Lawrence H. McDonald
National Archives
Once they are declared inactive, only a small part of the
records generated by the Federal agencies can be permanently
preserved. The records of the Office of strategic Services
(OSS) are an exception; most of them will be assigned for
permanent retention at the National Archives. All told, the
National Archives has now accessioned some 4,000 cubic feet
of OSS records.
OSS records (Record Group 226) draw heavy reference be­
cause the nearly 3,000 cubic feet of records accessioned from
the Central Intelligence Agency's OSS Archives, which have on­
ly recently been opened for research, reveal information nev­
er available before. They also offer the researcher a kind
of precis of World War II in microcosm, providing a wealth of
research material on almost every theater of the war in the
form of intelligence reports and files on all aspects of OSS
operations in combat and behind enemy lines. Except for the
Pacific Theater, where the OSS was exluded at General MacAr­
thur's request, one could write a history of the Second World
War from OSS files alone. Moreover, they present a record of
the administration and development of America's first nation­
al intelligence agency, the predecessor of the CIA. The cour­
age and daring of the men and women of the OSS is legendary,
making cloak and dagger a byword; these records document the
often incredible bravery of its agents and operational teams.
Incredible is not too strong a word; the OSS Director, Gener­
al Donovan himself, carried the OSS's ilL" tablet (potassium
cyanide) when in danger to avoid capture.
On July 11, 1941, President Roosevelt established (6 F.R.
3422) the Office of Coordinator of Information (COl) to col­
lect, correlate, and disseminate all intelligence relating to
national security. He appointed William J. Donovan chief of
this office. A corporation lawer and, in 1928, Acting Attor­
ney General, Donovan had served with great distinction in
World War I as an officer in the Forty-second Division, the
"Rainbow Division."
On June 13, 1942, the President abolished COl and estab­
lished by military order the Office of Strategic Services un­
der the jurisdiction of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS).
COl's records and all its functions, except for foreign infor­
mation activities assigned to the Office of War Information,
were transferred to OSS. JCS Directive No. 67 dated 23 June
1942 described and empowered OSS to prepare intelligence stud­
ies, to plan and execute subversive activities, and to collect
information through espionage. JCS 155/4/0 dated 23 December
1942 further authorized OSS to carry out psychological warfare
in direct support of military operations; it defined psycho­
14
1 5
logical warfare to include propaganda, economic warfare, sab­
otage, guerilla warfare, counter-espionage, contact with un­
derground groups in enemy-controlled territory and contact
with foreign-nationality groups in the United states.
Cal had been a small civilian agency composed of little
more than a handful of branches and offices; before the close
of World War II, ass, a semi-military agency, would grow to
consist of some fifty branches, divisions, and units with a
well-chosen staff of almost 13,000 men and women.
When the ass closed down in October 1945, nearly all
the records it had created were transferred to one of two
agencies, the state Department or the War Department. Rec­
ords of the Research and Analysis Branch (R and A), the
branch that created more records than any other in the ass,
were sent to the state Department where members of the old
R and A staff eventually formed the Office of Intelligence
Research.
The exceptional style and scholarship often typi­
cal of these records is not surprising when one considers
that William L. Langer, the R and A chief, appointed some of
the finest historians, economists, and social scientists in
the United states to serve in the R and A Branch. Among them,
to mention only a few, were Crane Brinton, Harold C. Deutsch,
Hajo Holborn, H. stuart Hughes, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., Her­
bert Marcuse, Carl Schorske, Walt Rostow, and Charles Kindle­
berger. Five of the R and A economists later became presi­
dents of the American Economic Association; seven of the his­
torians became presidents of the American Historical Associa­
tion.
In 1946, the State Department released R and A records
amounting to more than 1 ,000 cubic feet of documents to the
National Archives. R and A records include correspondence,
cables, minutes of meetings, progress reports, budget stud­
ies, press clippings, foreign publications files, POW interro­
gations, target information, and the R and A map collection.
The largest series by far, however, consists of informational
intelligence reports on political, economic, military, and
morale matters for almost every nation in the world.
In 1975,
the National Archives made the R and A records available for
general research. Researchers interested in a wide variety
of topics such as the Allied unconditional surrender policy,
the Resistance, tensions among the Allies, Allied relations
with the neutral nations, the question of a separate peace,
German opposition to Hitler, and many other subjects have
found valuable information in these records.
(See Appendix
1, Entries 1 -84) .
On the same day that President Truman terminated ass,
custody of all of its records other than those of R and A was
transferred to the Strategic Services Unit (SSU), a War De­
partment office made up of personnel drawn from the ass Se­
cret Intelligence and Counterintelligence Branches. The rec­
ords assigned to SSU comprised the files of the various ass
branches, divisions and units from Washington, New York, and
San Francisco as well as ass field offices from Casablanca to
16
Shanghai. Bringing together close to 6,000 cubic feet of op­
erational, administrative, and support records, the SSU care­
fully arranged them according to point of origin, branch, and
file type.
In 1947, the Central Intelligence Agency assumed custody
of these records and organized various finding aids for them.
In 1980, when the CIA began transferring its OSS Archives to
the National Archives, security requirements made it neces­
sary to retain all their finding aids.
For the 3,000 cubic feet of records it has already acces­
sioned from the CIA, however, the National Archives has begun
creating its own finding aids. Descriptive lists are now
available for many of the OSS records open to research at the
National Archives, and the lists, in turn, are now being com­
puterized to make OSS records still more accessible. A compu­
terized Core File, which arranges and sorts OSS records ac­
cording to point of origin, branch, file type, associated lo­
cation, entry, box, and folder, is already virtually complete.
Another year or more will be necessary to complete the com­
puterized Name File presently underway. The Name File will
provide an index of project names, personal names, and key­
words taken from the descriptive lists which the National Ar­
chives volunteer staff is now writing.
Most of the different kinds of files found in the Rand
A records also appear in the CIA's OSS Archives. However, un­
like the R and A records, the CIA's OSS Archives comprise not
only intelligence records, such as those found in the files
of the Counterintelligence Branch, but also the records of co­
vert operations and other functions performed by Special Oper­
ations, Operational Group Command, Morale Operations, the His­
tory Office, Maritime Unit, Schools and Training, the Field
Photo Branch, and various administrative and support records.
Some of the subjects of research in the OSS records ac­
cessioned from the CIA include the following:
British ori­
gins of the OSS, American ethnic groups and the war, OSS mo­
rale operations, OSS use of black propaganda and systematic
misinformation, interrogations of POW's, special weapons, the
Dixie Mission to Maoist Yenan, the correspondence of John
Ford and John Steinbeck concerning the Nisei Japanese, Burma
operations of the famed OSS Detachment 101, the special role
of scholars and historians in the OSS, the tragic death of
OSS Captain John Birch, the large OSS R&D collection of press
extracts translated from German newspapers, early OSS con­
tacts in Vietnam and Southeast Asia, the OSS Censorship and
Documentation Branch collection of passports and credentials,
plans for the use of skywriting to prey on the special fears
of the Japanese, manuals on disguises, on guerrilla warfare,
and on lock-picking, the V-1 and V-2 rockets, analysis of Hit­
ler's speeches, reports on the German efforts to overthrow
Hitler, the OSS General Counsel, and the war crimes trials.
(See Appendix 2, Entries 87-190.)
--------
17
But this limited sample cannot convey the consistently
high level of interest elicited by practically all series of
ass records once they are described and open to research.
Much of the ass material accessioned in recent years remains
largely untapped.
Much more, of course, remains to be written about ass.
Intelligence and Espionage: An Analytical Bibliography by
George C. Constantinides (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press,
1983) discusses many of the books on ass. Thomas F. Troy's
Donovan and the CIA: A History of the Establishment of the
Central Intelligence Agency (Frederick, Md.: University Publi­
cations of America, 1981), originally published by CIA, in­
cludes an account of the origins and development of the ass.
Federal Records of World War II, which was published by the
National Archives in 1950-51, provides a brief description of
the functions and administrative history of the various branch­
es and units within Cal and OSS. The War Report of the OSS
was prepared by the SSU History Project and published with an
introduction by Kermit Roosevelt (New York: Walker, 1976).
Historians and OSS veterans have already done research
in these records. We are confident that their work will cast
greater light on the history of World War II and the achieve­
ment of the Office of strategic Services.
Appendix 1: Record Group 226, Entries 1-86: Records of OSS
Research and Analysis Branch, etc. (pp. 18-20)
Appendix 2: Record Group 226, Entries 87-190: CIA's OSS Ar­
chive, accessioned in the 1980s (pp. 21-23)
Selected Box and Folder Descriptions [compiled by the newslet­
ter editor from copies provided by the National Archives]:
Algiers Files (Entry 97), pp. 24-32, including a general de­
scription of the files (pp. 24-26), and selected folder
descriptions (pp. 28-32), listing, e.g., the contents of
Folder 19 (with 210 pp. of intelligence on France), of
Folders 247-253 with captured German materials, and nu­
merous intelligence reports (Bern, Casablanca, etc.);
OSS New York and Field Station Records (Entry 168), listing
Kunming files (pp. 34-37), including Folder 225 on the
death of Capt. John M. Birch (p. 36); and listing, among
London files (pp. 37-38), files on guerrilla warfare in
Russia and Poland, and on German weapons and armor; among
Madrid files (p. 39), Folder 472 on Iberian operations,
organization, relations with the embassy, etc.; among
New York OSS Records (pp. 40-47), material on Yugoslavia
(Folder 555, p. 40), research papers on German radio news
(Folders 601 & 602, p. 41), and material on Japanese pro­
paganda (Folders 817-820, pp. 43-44), as well as on Labor
relations in occupied Europe (pp. 45-47); and among
Paris files (pp. 48-49), field war diaries (Folder 951)
and material on German POWs, their backgrounds and person­
al histories, POW School, etc. (Folders 962-966)
[APPENDIX 1]
OSS R&A. VISUAL PRESENTATION. AND FNB BRANCHES RECORDS
RECORD nROup 226
ENTRIES 1-86
(STACK l5W4)
RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS BRANCH (ENTRIES 1-84)
BOX
.Q!!.:.
ENTRY
ENTRY. TInE
1
R&A General Correspondence. 1942-46
2
Correspondence Re the Civil Affairs StaRing Area (CASA) OutpoStSE the
Presidio. Honterey c8t., 1945
2
1/l/A
3
Cablegrams Received by the COl, 1942
1
l/l/A
4
Despatches Received from Neutral ForeiRn Posts, 1941-42
3
l/l/A
5
CablegramB Received from OSS Outposts, 1942-44
5
l/l/B
LOCATION
5/l0/D-F
"
m
"tl
"
0
c
6
CableRramB, To and From OSS outposts
7
ChronoloRical File of CablegramB
8
R&A Reports re Political, Social and Economic Conditions, 1941-46
14
5/11/E-F
c:
"m
C
9
10
11
3
64
l/l/C
5/l3/A
...
...
'"z
Reports re European Railroads and BridRes
3
5/l0/B
Reports of the Joint Psychological Warfare Committee, 1942
1
5/9/V
OSS Orders. Memoranda, Bulletins, Circulars, and Instructions
12
Economic Intelligence of British
13
Biographical Sketches and "Morgue 'Files" of the Populo D'Italia
14
R&A Name and Subject Card Indexes to Entry 16
15
Descriptive ("Accession") Lists of Intelligence Reports for E16
16
Regular Series R&A Intelligence Reports, 1941-45
17
Name and Subject Card Indexes to Entries 19, 21 and 23
18
Descriptive ("Accession") Lists for RM Reports In E19
19
R&A Reports,
20
Descriptive ("Accession") Lists for R&A Intelligence Reports in E2l
21
R&A Intelligence Reports, "L" Series, 1942-45
22
Descriptive ("Accession") Lists of R&A Reports in E23
23
R&A Reports re Enemy Logistics, "Order of Battle" Series, 1942-45
24
Card Abstracts of Reports Arranged by dissemination ("A"-prefixed)
nunmer, 1942-45
25
Survey of ForelR"
26
Cross-Reference Cards to Unidentified Reports re Europe and Asia,
1942-45
~nistry
of Econ. Warfare, 1942
2
>­
:J:
...>­
0
z
>­
5/9/F
....
>­
:a
1
l/l/C
"::
27
5/11/A
'"'"
<
"XL"
Series, 1941-46
Expert~
Interviews of RefURees in US
6/l/C
8
1648
4/l5/A
l/l/e tp 4/13/B
6/9/e
3
4/15/8
7
4/l5/C
4
4/l5/D
457
2
231
11/6/A and l2/6/A
4/l5/D
5/l/A
6/ll/C
11
5/l0/A
6/11/E
[Newsletter page 18]
R&A ECONOMICS DIVIsImt (ENTRIEfi 27-36)
27
Correspondence of Emile Depres, Economics Div. Chief, 1941-45
2
517IA
28
Economics Div. Corr. and Reports, 1942-44
1
517IA
29
Reports Prepared by the Economics Div. of the Office of COl
1
517/A
30
Recovery of Looted Art Treasures in Germany, 1940-45
1
5/7/A
31
Agricultural Conditions in Europe and North Africa, 1941-44
1
5/7/A
32
German Manpower, 1942-44
2
517IA
33
Military Supplies of the Axis Powers, 1942-44
1
51718
34
Industrial Resources of Axis Powers, 194)-43
1
5/7/8
35
German Trade and Shipping
2
51718
36
Economic and Industrial Conditions in Germany- 1943-44
2
517/8
R&A
~UROPE-AFRICA
DIVISION (ENTRIES 37-52)
37
Correspondence of the Division Chief, 1942-45
7
5/718
38
General Correspondence, 1941-45
6
517IC
39
Correspondence re Outposts, 1942-45
3
517ID
40
Correspondence re Europe and Africa, 1942-45
2
517ID
41
Cablegrams to and from Outposts
1
517/D
42
Hbnth1y Progress Reports, 1943-45
1
517IE
43
Contact File Interviews and San Francisco Conference, 1945
1
517IE
44
"Civil Affairs Guides" and Correspondence re Germany and Germsn
Occupied Countries
8
517IE
45
"Outpost Informational Letters," 1943-45
1
517/F
46
Algiers Outpost, 1943-44
1
5171
47
Balkan Activities, 1944-46
2
5171
48
Cairo Outpost, 1944-45
2
5/8/A
49
Outposts in France, 1944-45
2
5/8/A
50
outposts in Germany, 1945]
1
5/8/A
51
Outposts in Italy, 1943-45
3
5/8/B
52
London Outpost
5
5/8/B
53
Far East Div. Correspondence with Outposts, 1942-46
7
5/8/c
,.,:0
"II
:0
o
o
c
o
...o
...>
...
,.,
%
z
...>
o
z
>
1
5/8/D
Reports re China and Formosa, 1941-46
4
5/8/D
o
Biweekly Latin American Situation Reports, 1944-45
2
5/8/D
,.,<
Latin American Div., Photographs of Fritz Ehemann, a German Merchant
in Venezuela
1
5/8/E
54
Security-Classified Records 9
55
56
Fa~
East, 1944-45
~
>
;lD
57
%
'"
[19J
57A-D
R&A Branch, Psychological Div.:
and Budget Records
58
Reading File, Reports, Research
3
4/l4/A
Minutes of the Meeting of the Board of Analysts, 1941-43
1
5/8/E
59
Projects Committee Minutes of Meetings, 1942-46
4
5/8/E
60
Projects Committee, Correspondence. 1943-45
1
5/8/E
R&AINTERDEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEE FOR ACQUISITION OF FOREIGN PUBLICATIONS, 1942-45 (E6l-72)
61
New Delhi, Correspondence. 1944-45
1
5/8/F
62
New Delhi. Reports re Southeast Asis. 1944-45
2
5/8/F
63
Stockholm,
1
5/8/F
64J
Correspondence from Washington. London. snd Paris. 1942-45
1
5/8/F
65
Correspondence from Finance Branch re Personnel. 1943-45
1
5/8/F
....
c
66
German POW Interrogations re Archives and Publishing
1
5/8/F
67
Semimothly Outpost Letters and Monthly Reports from Interdepartmental
Committee, 1945 (cf' E70)
1
5/8/F
>­
....
....
:z:
Correspond~nce
...."V:II
:II
....
Z
:>­
....
68
Foreign Publications Card File • 1943-45
8
5/10/c
69
Foreign Newspapers and Periodicals Card File
1
5/10/c
5/8/F
List of German Periodicals Maintained by the Stockholm Office.
Dee. 1944 (Cf E67)'
1
71
Lists of Foreign Publications Microfilmed. 1942-45
2
5/9/A
72
Swedish Language Newspaper Clippings
2
5/9/A
73
ETO General Correspondence. 1944-45
8
5/9/A
74
William Langer and Chandler Morse. Correspondence. 1943-45
3
5/9/B-C
75
Allan Evans. Deputy Chief. Correspondence. 1942-45
4
5/9/C
76
Biographical Records Division. Correspondence. 1944-45
1
5/9/c
77
Enemy Objective Unit of the Economic Warfare Div•• Correspondence
1943-45
6
5/9/D
78
London Joint Target Group Correspondence. 1944 (cf E79 and E 80)
1
5/9/D
79
London Joint Target Committee. Oil Targets Reports. 1944
1
5/9/D
80
London Joint Oil Target Committee. 1944-45
1
5/9/D
81
OSS Mission to Germany. Correspondenee. 1944-45
3
5/9/D
82
Freneh Politiea1 and Eeonomie Conditions
1
5/9/E
83
MEDTO Correspondenee, 1943-45
2
519/E
84
China Theater Correspondenee. 1944-45
2
5/9/F
85
Records re Msps. Charts. Motion Pictures. ete. of the Visual
Presentation Br •• 1942-45
86
FNB Correspondenee, 1941-45 (ef RlOO)
70
o
C
c:
o
o
z
,..:>­
:>­
'"
...<
o
:
VI
33
5/12/A
1
5/9/F
[20J
[APPENDIX 2J
·ENTRY
~TRY
87
+88 1
89
ass
OPERATIONAL, ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT RECORDS
(CIA's OSS ARCHIVE)
RECORD GROUP 226
~OX3
DTY
TITLE
Austrian Applications for Nazi Membership
(25 )
Overseas Cable File
Italian Intelligence Personalities
668
(12)
3
17/12/85
34
5
03/01/80
640
24/l4/A
6
30/10/86
NNPD
7
03/09/85
8
(post-OSS)
9
23/04/85
10
12/02/85
11
03/09/85
History of OSS in London
+95 2
+96 2
(2.5 )
CIG/CIA Organization Charts
Combined Intelliqence Committee
(0 .. 5 )
Algiers File
98
10
2
2l/l/C
*
45
7/32/B
19/1/C
Pictorial Records Section Files
+99 2
+100 2
+101
Propaganda Charts
Washington Communications Office
+97 2
2
(Temporary)
OSS History Office Files
107
Foreign Nationalities Branch
131
5
Miscellaneous Files: YUgoslavia, Greece,
and Bulgaria. Also: Special Teams
Burma Film
(1)
+103 2
Special Forces
+104
Communications Chrono File
5
(1)
Survey of Foreign Experts
3Z
102
+105
+106 2
@
Secret Intelligence Operations
+107 2 @ Survey of Foreign Experts
+108 2
Washington Registry SI Branch Field Files
109
+110 2
111
@ Washington Registry Intelligence Files
*
*
*
*
*
13
14
6/6/A
15
03/01/80
03/01/80
03/01/80
16
08/07/86
6/6/B
l6/l5/C
17
03/01/80
18
12/03/86
16/15/E
19
01/07/86
8/5/E
16/15/0
20
21
01/07/86
465
16/18/0
22
13/05/86
124
14/l/B
23
03/02/87
*
6/6/C
24
03/01/80
6/7/E
26
03/01/80
7/32/A
27
12/02/85
6/7/E
6/9/A
29
50
+112
Propaganda Samples
1
*
+113 2
114
+115 2
Censorship & Document Branch Files
7
*
52
*
+116
117
8/6/F
6/2/A
11
Field Intelligence Reports; Theater Officer 53
Correspondence: Draft Histories
(2)
Secret Intelligence "A" Reports
25
Photo Copies of General Donovan's Files
London Field Files
Office of the Director, OSS
Special Devices
118
Accession Logs
119
London Counter-intelligence Files
03/01/80
7
*
(1)
24
*
8/5/B
(43)
15/7/B
+121 1
Field Radio & Cable File
17/8/C
140
30
31
Washington Counter-intelligence & TSS Files 46
32
33
(CI)
34
08/07/86
(CI)
37
(CI)
Field Files: Athens, Austria, Barcelona,
Bern, Heidelberg, Lisbon, London and
Caserta; and Washington X-2
(17)
38
(CI)
Field Files: Bern, Stockholm and Caserta
59
39
08/07/86
124
+. Included in
computer
index.
:z:
'"z
>
....
o
z
>
....
>
;xl
n
:z:
<
'"
VI
12/02/85
(8)
Bern & Madrid Field Files
>
....
....
03/01/80
12/03/86
123
'"o
(Sp. Devices)
35
X-2Files
o
c:
n
03/01/80
36
Miscellaneou'~)
;xl
o
(Microfilm)
(3)
s
122
;xl
'"."
(Temporary)
+ 120
@.
(Microfilm)
4
+91
94
1
2
l8/20/F
II 8/9/0
Washington R+C & Field Photo Branch Records 49
@ Central Files
19/2/F
DATE
REC'D 5
01/10/85
(CI)
+90 2
92
93
SF 115
LOCATION 4 ITEM #
l5/5/F
1. Box List.
3. ( ) • cubic feet 4. Aisle/Compartment/Shelf
lOcation in 16-W-4.
2. Descriptive List. S. Day/Month/Year
Entries in 13-W-3 noted by •
( ) - reason file
Location
omitted for files
withheld by CIA
Not declassified by 01/06/87
not yet accessioned.
[21]
126
Caserta Counter-intelligence Files
(28)
40
127
128
Madrid Counter-intelligence Files
Paris Field Files
(16 )
+129
+130 1
Cable Logs ("A" Reports)
Budget Data for COl, OSS and SSU:
and Field Photo Negatives
02/10/84
12/03/86
+131
Washington/Field Office: Administrative
and Support Records: Cables
+131A2
+132 1
+133 1
ERE: Emergency Rescue Equipment
Washington Services Branch Records
Washington/Field Office: Miscellaneous
Administrative Records
4
• 6/9/B
4
17/2/B
41
42
43
44
6/9/C
45
02/10/84
• 6/9/B
45
02/10/84
15/16/D
15/8/C
46
47
08/07/86 ~
48
12/02/85
49
50
23/04/85
03/09/85
(13 )
21
5
*
59
171
+134 1
Washington R+D: R+C (with 30/10/86 increment) 372
*
+135
Washington Communications Branch Records
22/23/C
+136
Field Files: Algiers, Austria, Bari; Burma, 187
Cairo, Calcutta, Caserta, Denmark, J~nming,
London, Paris, New York, washington
Washington Secretariate & SI Branch Recs,
28
Washington X-2 Branch Records
4
Washington/Field Station Records:
298
Cairo, Calcutta, Caserta, Honolulu,
New York, Paris, singapore,
stockholm and Washington
94
Washington Pacific Coast Area/Field
station Records
+137 1
+138
+139
+146t.
+147 2
86
7/32/B
20/20/C
(CI)
(cl)
"ll
22/07/86 ~
~
",
z
16/17/F
l7/7/A
21/4/F
53
64
65
....>
08/07/86 0
12/03/86 .;
11/06/85 ;0>
o
.%
,.,<
VI
17/3/C
66
12/03/86
6
17/2/E
71
12/03/86
OSS Washington Sectet Inte11igence/
Field station Records
5
17/3/B
73
12/03/86
14
19/1/A
74
03/09/85
l8/22/F
22/20/D
75
76
17/12/85
12/02/85
Washington/Field Office: Miscellaneous
138
R+A and R+D Records
107
Washington OSS Operation & Support Records 267
10
OSS New York/London Office Records
+148 2
OSS New York/Overseas Station Records:
Chungking, Dakar, Holland, Istambul,
Kandy, Kunming, Lisbon, London,
New York, Paris, Pretoria, Singapore,
Stockholm and Tangier
+149
OSS New York Office: Survey of Foreign
Experts Records
136
1
20/14/B
22/18/A
77
78
06/08/85
23/04/85
21/1/E
79
12/02/85
80
12/02/85
*
7/32/B
150
OSS R+D Production Records
(0.5)
82
151
OSS Map Records
(0.5 )
83
+152 2
OSS R+A Branch Records
(combined with Entry 164)
+153
OSS R+A Branch Records
+154 2
OSS Field Offices: Bari, Bucharest, Burma, 218
Cairo, Caserta, Kandy, Kunming
+. Included in
computer
index.
1. Box List.
c
c
o
",
c
~
OSS Washington Miscellaneous Records
OSS Field Station Operations and
Services Records
+144 1
+145 2
(cl)
(Sp. Devices)
4
22/23/B
85
23/04/85
14
16/14/E
86
12/03/86
88
02/10/84
*
6/9/F
3. ( , • cubic feet
4. Aisle/Compartment/Shelf
location in 16-W-4.
2. Descriptive List. 5. Day/Month/Year
Entries in 13-W_3 noted by •
( ) • reason file
Location omitted for files
, . Not declassified by 01/06/87
withheld by CIA
not yet access!onQd.
-
[22J
+155 2
OSS Censorship & Documents Branch Records
2
156 @ Secret Intelligence Branoh Indexes
OSS New York George Office Records
+157
OSS Seventh Army Records
+158 2
OSS New York Secret Intelligence Branch
159
OSS New York Secret Intelligence Branch
+160
2
@
OSS Schools and Training Branch Records
+161
Office of the Director, COI/OSS Records
+162
General Magruder Records and Papers
163
2
OSS R+A Branch/Map Procurement
+1 6 4
(combined with Entry 152)
2
OSS operations: Mediterranean and Burma
+165
China and Korea Counter-intelligence Files
Miscellaneous Top Secret Reports File
166
167
4
275
20
10
39
12
9
44
(49)
6
12
(97)
2
2
OSS R+A and State/ORI Records
OSS Washington Special Operations Branch
OSS Miscellaneous Files
15
(1)
(0.3)
180
181
182
Director, OSS Official Records
Microfilmed Official OSS Records
OSS Field station Records
(0.3)
(4)
(44)
OSS Washington SI/Special Funds Records
Washington-OSS-Records
35
1
165
186
187
Washington-OSS-Communications Records
Washington-OSS-Communicayions Records
Washington-OSS-Communications Records
(1)
(2)
(2)
188
Washington-OsS-Communications Records
(5)
189
190 1
@
Washington-osS-Communications Records
Director1s Office & Field station Records
+. Included in
computer
index.
1. Box List.
95
96
97
12/03/86
03/02/87
12/03/86
98
(post-OSS)
22/23/C
99
23/04/85
l8/2l/F
100
17/12/85
l7/2/C
l7/6/F
l7/7/C
l4/5/B
l7/7/B
101 (Microfilm/Cl)
102
(CI)
1
178
179
+183
+184
03/02/87
08/07/86
12/03/86
12/03/86
(CI)
1
95
Field Files: Kandy, Kunming, London!
Madrid, New York, Paris, Shangha ,
Singapore, Stockholm
169 @ OSS Washington/London Special Funds Branch 16
(0.3)
170
Strategic Services Unit Liaison Control
of Records
Washington X-2 Branch Recorda
OSS Cairo SI/X-2 Branch Records
Washington OSS Official Subject Records
OSS/Rome X-2 Branch Records
OSS R+A Branch, Latin American Section
OSS Miscellaneous Records
89
90
92
93
94
(2)
+168 2
171
172 2
+173
174
+175
+176 2
+177 2
l4/4/B
l2/l0/E
(2)
742
22/l8/C
104
12/02/85
l4/5/D
105
106
03/02/87
107
108
109
110
(cI)
03/02/87
12/03/86
(CI)
111
112
12/03/86
12/03/86
113
114
115
12/03/86
l4/4/B
l7/3/A
l6/l4/E
l7/3/C
l6/l5/A
116
117
118
14/4/C
l6/l5/C
l4/l4/C
119
120
121
122
(CI)
(Microfilm)
(Microfilm)
(CI)
03/02/87
12/03/86
(Microfilm)
(CI)
123
(CI)
124
125
126
(CI)
(CI)
22/07/86
3. ( J .. cubic feet
4. Aisle/Compartment/Shelf
location in l6-W-4.
2. Descriptive List. 5. DayiMonth/Year
Entries in l3-W-3 noted by
( ) • reason file
Location omitted for files
withheld by' CIA
Not declassified by 01/06/81
not yet accesaioned.
[23]
*
ALGIERS FILES
BOX AND FOLDER LIST
RECORD GROUP 226
ENTRY 97
Quoted from the SF 115 dated 11 April 1979:
o..,
"Documentation concerning operations in North Africa, primarily
operational group command type activities: psychological warfare, subversive
activity behind the enemy lines, exfiltration of allied prisoners, and situa- z
tion reports regarding public morale and effect of allied and axis propaganda. ~~
The file includes operational activity files, correspondence, intelligence
~
report, and personnel folders. Covers period 1942-1945. Arranged by subject r>
number and thereunder by folder number. Volume is 16 cubic feet. (CIA Job
No. 58-31)"
<:
rn
'"
Revised description:
"Documentation concerning activities in North Africa of the Secret
Intelligence Branch, Special Operations Branch and the Operational Group
Command.* Raw intelligence and intelligence reports include information
concerning battle order and other military information, defenses, bombing
targets, transportation, economic and political situation, personalities and
effect of psychological warfare in North Africa (Free French and ethnic
groups), Italy, Southern France, Spain, Jugoslavia, Eastern Europe, Austria
and Germany. The entry includes correspondence, telegrams and reports regard­
ing special operations, organization and other administrative matters,
personnel and plans for missions. (Many files on the results of operations
have been withdrawn). Covers the period 1942-1945, with one 1946 file.
Arranged by SSU file code. Volume is 18 cubic feet. (CIA Job. No. 58-31)"
*For description of Branch purpose and function see following page.
[24]
SECRET INTELLIGENCE BRANCH
This Branch, which was known in the Office of the Coordinator of Informa­
tion and in the early days of OSS as Special Activities B, was renamed the
Secret Intelligence Branch on January 3, 1943. It collected secret intelli­
gence in all parts of the world except the Western Hemisphere, evaluated
such intelligence and disseminated it to authorized agencies, and established
and maintained direct liaison with Government and Allied secret intelligence
agencies.
o"TI
-4
:I:
m
SPECIAL OPERATIONS BRANCH
This Branch, set up in the Office of the Coordinator of Information and
~
known in the early days of OSS as Special Activities/G, was renamed the Special '
Operations Branch on January 3, 1943. It was responsible for accomplishing
~
sabotage in enemy and enemy-occupied countries, for organizing and supporting
:I:
underground resistance movements, for conducting such operations as were not
assigned to other Government agencies and not under the direct control of a
theater or area commander of the Army or Navy, and for equipping and training
individuals and organizations required for its operations. Under its Chief and
his Deputy Chief there were two operations officers, one for Europe and one
for the Far East. The Maps and Reports Officer was responsible for research
and the preparation of reports in connection with special operations.
a
OPERATIONAL GROUP COMMAND
In December 1942 the Office of Strategic Services was authorized to
conduct guerilla warfare behind enemy lines. This activity was assigned to
the Special Operations Branch until May 13, 1943, when the first separate
operational group was authorized. This group and others established later
comprised the Operational Group Command, which at first was under the Office
of the Deputy Director, Operations, but which later, by mid-1944, became more
nearly independent. The Command aided anddirected open-resistance groups in
carrying out guerilla warfare and in attacking selected targets. Unlike
the Special Operations Branch, the Command activated guerillas as military
units that operated in uniform and were not primarily concerned with
individual acts of sabotage. Operational teams consisting of American
volunteers who spoke the language of the target area were selected and trained
by the Command for overseas duty.
[25]
::0
ALGIERS FILES
BOX AND FOLDER LIST
RECORD GROUP 226
ENTRY 97
L
2.
~
M
l:J
~
ALGIERS: INTELLIGENCE REPORTS ON SOUTHERN FRANCE, NORTH AFRICA, SPAIN,
OPERATIONS PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATIVE (Boxes 1-3, Folders 1-56)
~
I;
ALGIERS: INTELLIGENCE ON NORTH AFRICA AND ITS ETHNIC GROUPS, COMPILATION OF ~
SELECTED DOCUMENTS ON FREE FRENCH IN NORTH AFRICA (Boxes 4-6,
!:il
Folders 57-85)
3. ALGIERS:
REPORTS OF OPERATIONS, PERSONNEL, TRAINING REPORTS, ORGANIZATION,
MISSION REPORTS, RELATIONS WITH FREE FRENCH IN NORTH AFRICA,
(Boxes 6-10, Folders 86-149)
4. ALGIERS:
MAPS (MIDDLE EAST, ASIA MINOR, TOWNS IN SOUTHERN FRANCE) AND
PHOTOGRAPHS (HEADQUARTERS, INSIGNIA) (Boxes 10-12, Folders 150­
215)
<
IT1
II>
5. ALGIERS:
SCHOOLS AND TRAINING (S&T) AND SECURITY (SEC) BRANCHES PERSONNEL
AND ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS, SECRET INTELLIGENCE (SI) BRANCH ADMIN­
ISTRATIVE MATTERS AND SCATTERED INTELLIGENCE REPORTS (Boxes 12-14,
Folders 216-238)
6. ALGIERS:
SECRET INTELLIGENCE (SI) BRANCH: HETEROGENEOUS INTELLIGENCE COVER­
ING NORTH AFRICA, ITALY, SOUTHERN FRANCE. SPAIN, BALKANS. EAST
EUROPE, GERMANY, BATTLE ORDER AND OTHER MILITARY INFORMATION,
DEFENSES, BOMBING TARGETS, TRANSPORTATION, ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL
SITUATION, PERSONALITIES: ALSO SCATTERED ORGANIZATIONAL AND OTHER
ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS (Boxes 14-29, Folders 239-507)
7. ALGIERS:
SECRET INTELLIGENCE (SI) BRANCH; OPERATIONAL RECORDS INCLUDING
CABLES AND CORRESPONDENCE ABOUT PERSONNEL, RECRUITING, PLANS FOR
INTELLIGENCE/LIAISON MISSIONS TO JUGOSLAVIA, FRANCE, HUNGARY,
NORTH ITALY, GERMAN AUSTRIA;ALSO RAW INTELLIGENCE REPORTS
(Boxes 29-36, Folders 508-627)
8. ALGIERS:
SPECIAL OPERATIONS (SO) BRANCH;PLANS FOR OPERATIONS IN EUROPE,
DIRECTIVES ON RESPONSIBILITIES, RECRUITING OF JEDBURGH TEAMS,
RECRUITING AND TRAINING OF FRENCH (Files on results of air and
other operations mostly withdrawn (Boxes 36-45, Folders 628-800)
[26]
ALGIERS FILES
BOX AND FOLDER LIST
RECORD GROUP 226
ENTRY 97
1.
Box
1
ALGIERS:
INTELLIGENCE REPORTS ON SOUTHERN FRANCE, NORTH AFRICA, SPAIN,
OPERATIONS PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATIVE (Boxes 1-3, Folders 1-56)
File No.
Folder
ALGIERS-OSS
-AD-l
-INT-l
1) 321a, [Intelligence, Southern France] - Original intelligence
reports, maps, plans, overlays of Southern France, partly in
French, about 100 pp., 1943.
2) 321b, [Intelligence, Southern France] - Original intelligence
reports, maps, plans, overlays, photographs of destruction in
Marseilles and Toulon, TOMMY materials, partly in French,
about 150 pp., 1943.
3) 322, [Intelligence, Southern France] - TOMMY disseminations,
reports on transportation, coastal defense, and psychological
warfare in Southern France, maps and photographs, partly in
French, about 200 pp., 24 May 1943-1 June 1943.
4) 323, 7th Army - Correspondence between Reports Section Algiers
and SSS, G-2, 7th Army on administrative matters and military
intelligence requests and reports, about 125 pp., 7 Apr. 1944­
14 Sept. 1944.
5) 324, Orders - Incomplete set of orders for SI, 2677th HQ Regt.
appointments, move to Caserta, 60 pp., 9 Mar. 1944-23 Aug. 1944.
6) 346, Casablanca - Miscellaneous documents and letters between
Algiers and Casablanca, administrative, intelligence (including
report on German saboteurs sent to U.S.) 45 pp., 3 Mar. 1943­
12 Sept. 1943.
7) 349, [Fighting French] - Rosenborough memo "The Present Position
of the Fighting French with Relation to Resistance within France
and our Policy Toward the French", 11 pp., 21 Oct. 1942.
2
ALGIERS-OSS
-AD-1&2
-EQ-1
-INT-1
-AD-2
8) 362 - Map of Departments of France, Withdrawal Notice, 1 p.,
-DG-PRO-1
May 1944.
9) 371, GINNY - OG operations in Italy, instructions, personnel,
sketch of target, 95 pp., 26 Dec. 1943-4 Apr. 1944.
[27J
- 2 ­
Box
2
File No.
Folder
ALGIERS-OSS
-AD-l&2
-EQ-l
-INT-l
10) 374, SPAIN, BATAAN - Exchange of messages between Madrid and
Algiers on administrative matters and planning for Southern
France, 1 Withdrawal Notice, 80 pp., 5 Oct. 1943-12 May 1944.
-OP-l
11) 377, Gorgona - Operations of OP 1 & 2, Gorgon (Seneca) and
Capr~ia staffing, intelligence reports, casualties in German
raid, 85 pp., 12 Dec. 1943-25 June 1944.
-OP-2
12) 378, Capraia - Personnel for OG OMAHA, report of operations,
weather and shipping intelligence, 43 pp., 29 Jan. 1944­
25 June 1944.
13) 382 [Intelligence on German Activities] - Information from
interrogations about German code, enemy sabotage methods,
escape plans for parachutists, sabotage reports, information
sought by German agents in U.S., 57 pp., 29 June 1943­
16 Apr. 1944.
14) 383 ALFA - Plans, equipment and personnel for special Fifth
Army mission, 53 pp., 18 Dec. 1943-24 Feb. 1944.
15) 386, DALLAS - Coordination of OSS operations with ISSU6 and
Air Force against enemy transport, plans for operations by
Italian OGs in Appennine, maps and overlays, targets, ob­
jectives, funds, 85 pp., 16 Dec. 1943-27 Mar. 1944.
-EQ-l
16) 388, Test Drops and Others - Reports on test drops and blind
landing equipment, 16 pp., 16 Dec. 1943-21 Feb. 1944.
17) 389, Central European S.O.- Possible Special Operations desk
in Algiers for operations in Germany and Central Europe, 7 pp.,
17 Feb. 1944-14 Apr. 1944.
18) 390, SIMCOL - Reports of operations of SIMCOL, an OG mission
to aid escaping Allied personnel, interrogation report,
reports by returning personnel, 25 pp., 14 Mar. 1944-26 Mar. 1944.
19) 425, Intelligence, France - Reports of conditions in France,
on collaboration, political organizations, German cipher,
French opinions 9 Battle Order and other military information
on France, the Maquis, requests for intelligence, plans for
combat intelligence teams in Southern France, partly in French,
210 pp., 12 Nov. 1943-21 July 1944.
-AD-l
20) 434, Advanced Base 2677th Hqs. Co. Exp. (Prov) - Personnel
needs and table of organization for operational supplies,
draft organization plan for Mediterranean area. 20 pp.,
26 Mar. 1943-30 Nov. 1943.
-AD-2
20a) #358 - Table of Organization SAC, 1 p. n.d.
-INT-l (c)
20b) #359 - Empty Folder
[28]
- 3 ­
Box
2
3
File No.
Folder
ALGIERS-OSS
-AD-l&2
-EQ-l
-INT-l
21) 446 [EAST SIDE] - Aborted plan for EAST SIDE team to infiltrate
Genoa to collect intelligence, 3 pp., 4 Feb. 1944.
ALGIERS-oSS
-INT-l&2
23) [Miscellaneous Intelligence] - Information on situation in
Spain, Catalan problem, map of Dauphine, Savoie, intelligence
on Southern France, Italy, part in French, part Italian and
English, 1 Withdrawal Notice, 60 pp., 21 Apr. 1943-9 June 1943.
22) 447 - Administrative memos on mail, duty officers, use of
vehicles, 22 pp., 28 Dec. 1943-22 Apr. 1944.
24) Oran, Reports from - Troop strengths in France and Italy,
reports on individuals and their affiliations, part in French,
85 pp., 26 Jan. 1943-9 Feb. 1943.
25) Personnel, OSS - Recruiting in North Africa (general as well
as individuals), assignments, 10 pp., 25 Jan. 1943-2 Mar. 1943.
26) OSS, London - Operations memo on ETO (France, Belgium, Iberian
peninsula), collaboration between London and Algiers, German
propaganda in Algiers, 31 pp., 13 Feb. 1943-31 Mar. 1943.
27) Capitain Parisot and Lt. Chevallier - Officers in Morocco,
their contact with U.S. Army, in French, 4 pp., n.d.
28) E.R. Perkins - Assignment, 6 pp., 24 Dec. 1943-25 Mar. 1944.
29) Psychological Warfare Reports - Political intelligence reports
on Algiers and Morocco, situation in Spain and Portugal,
military information on France, part in French, 45 pp.,
19 Mar. 1943-16 Apr. 1943.
30) Pratt, Jack B. - Possible U.S. agent, 1 Withdrawal Notice,
1 pp., 25 Feb. 1943.
31) Pouches - Pouch list, 1 p., n.d.
32) Shapiro, Jerry - Travel orders, requests for photographs,
contact with Murrieta, 9 pp., 16 Dec. 1943-7 Feb. 1943
33)
Rygor-Polish Intelligence Service - Reports from Rygor on
interrogation of POW's of Polish nationality, reports on
Spanish question, Jewish-Arab issue, French army morale,
Algerian reaction to war, order of battle, General
Giraud's declaration, mostly in French, 1 Withdrawal Notice,
80 pp., 10 Feb. 1943-5 May 1943.
34) Spanish Republican Refugee Situation, North Africa - Report
from Oujda, pr-Nazis, data on emigres, prison situation,
7 pp., 18 Feb. 1943.
35) Schaeffer, Lieutenant - Activities of former officer of
Foreign Legion, allegedly collaborationist, 1 p., 13 Mar. 1943.
[29]
- 18 ­
Box
14
File No.
Folder
ALGIERS-SI
-INT-l
237) [North African Situation], WP 348 - Roseborough report on
Anglo-American French relations in North Africa and critique
of U.S. intelligence activities, 12 pp., Feb. 1943.
238) Distributees, 350 - Correspondence re distribution of OSS
reports, 45 pp., 9 Oct. 1943-19 Sept. 1944.
6.
ALGIERS:
-INT-l
SECRET INTELLIGENCE (SI) BRANCH; HETEROGENEOUS INTELLIGENCE COVERING
NORTH AFRICA, ITALY, SOUTHERN FRANCE, SPAIN, BALKANS, EAST EUROPE,
GERMANY, BATTLE ORDER AND OTHER MILITARY INFORMATION, DEFENSES, BOMB­
ING TARGETS, TRANSPORTATION, ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL SITUATION, PERSON­
ALITIES; ALSO SCATTERED ORGANIZATIONAL AND OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE
MATTERS (Boxes 14-29, Folders 239-507)
239) 380, [France, Intelligence] - Reports from France on the
Resistance, sabotage, German morale, 36 pp •• 15 Apr. 1944­
26 June 1944.
240) 424, Potter to Reid (sic) - Reports on Corsica, French
Committee of National Liberation, evaluation of French
Resistance, LD.descriptions, partly in French, 45 pp.,
15 Sept. 1943-6 Jan. 1944.
-INT-2
241) AFHQ "AQUITANIA" Reports Feb. 1944-Apr. 1944 - Gelleral
intelligence reports 1-3 on Southern France (order of battle,
defenses, topography, transportation, communications, in­ ternal situation, naval and air situation), about 80 pp.,
11 Feb. 1944-7 Apr. 1944.
242) AFHQ "AQUITANIA" Reports May 1944-June 1944 - General
intelligence reports 4 and 5 on Southern France. 60 pp.,
13 May 1944-13 June 1944.
243) "Iceland" Originals - Film.
244) "ICELAND" and Berne Originals - Raw intellignce on Northern
Italy and Southern France re industrial production, military
activities, transportation, partly in French and Italian,
70 pp., 1 Mar. 1944-13 Sept. 1944.
245) Miscellaneous Source Originals - Raw intelligence on St.
Astier aircraft factory with map, airfields, coastal defenses
in Southern France, situation in Elba, Algerian Government,
German morale, partly in French, 85 pp., 31 Mar. 1944-21 June 1944.
246) AAI Original Reports, AAl-l - 3 enemy maps, 22 June 1944.
247) Gliederung der Sicherungs, Krafte Map, AAI-2 - Overlay of
captured document 9battle order) 1 p., n.d.
248) Bandenlage, Map, AAI-3 - Overlay of captured document, 1 p"
annotated stand 1.4.44
[30]
- 19 ­
Bo:'<
14
File No.
ALGIERS-SI
-INT-2
Folder
"249) Banden-Karte, Map, AAI-4 - Overlay of captured document, 1 p.,
stand 11. 5.44.
250) Bandentatigkeit in der Zeit vom, Map, AAI-5 - Overlay of
captured document, 1 p., geh vom 16.5.44.
251) Bandenlage Mittel-Italien, Map, AAI-6 - Overlay of captured
document, 1 p., stand 31.3.44.
252) Feindlage, Maps - Overlay of captured document, 1 p., vom
29.11.1943.
253) Anhalt fur Krafteverteilung Wesliches Mittelmeer, Map, AAI-8 ­
Overlay of captured document, 1 p., stand 26.5.1944.
254)
15
ALGIERS-SI
-INT-2
"SEMINOLE" Originals - Raw intelligence on defenses around
Porto Corsini with annotated map, defenses around Cervia with
annotated maps from submarine mission DRUPE in northern
Adriatic, 8 pp., 28 June 1944-5 July 1944.
255) "DURRANTS" Originals #1 - Raw intelligence on troop locations
in Southern France, defenses in Durance valley, sketch map
of Avignon area, sketch map of air base d'Istres, partly in
French, 2 Feb. 1944-15 May 1944.
256) "DURRANTS" Originals #2 - Map of Toulouse showing plane
factories, 2 pp., 5 Apr. 1944.
257) "DURRANTS" Originals #3 - Sketch showing points of fall of
bombs on Courbevoie sur Seine on 31 Dec. 1943 indicating
industries damaged, 2 pp., 10 Feb. 1944.
258) "DURRANTS" Originals #4 - Sketch of St. Yan airfield (Saone
et Loire), 2 pp., 22 Feb. 1944.
259) "DURRANTS" Originals #5 - Bombing results and air intelligence
on Villacoublay with sketch, 3 pp., 5,6 Feb. 1944.
260)
"DURRANTS" Originals #6 - Raw intelligence on airfields of
St. Cyr and Guayancourt with sketch map, 2 pp., 22 Feb. 1944.
261) "DURRANTS" Originals #7 - Raw intelligence on 67 airfields
in France, 4 sketch maps, partly in French, 25 pp., 15 Jan.
1944.
262) "FULTON" Originals - Raw intellige on activities of security
troops, transportation in the Marseille-Toulon-Avignon region,
MERCY reports on German billets, rail transportation,
sabotage, German agents or sympathizers, partly in French,
170 pp., March 1944-Aug. 1944.
263) "S'11JART" Originals - Intelligence on interior navigation in
France, report on transportation provisions of June 1940
armistice and German activities, partly in French, 60 pp.,
25 Feb. 1943-25 June 1944.
[31]
.
---------
Box
21
- 29 ­
File No.
Folder
ALGIERS-SI
-INT-6
366) Siena Reports, IR 365 to IR 399 - Raw intelligence on battle
order, naval activities, motor traffic, industrial produc­
tion, enemy dumps in Italy, etc., 25 pp., 24 Apr. 1944­
2 May 1944.
367) Siena Reports, IR 400 to IR 499 - Raw intelligence on enemy
def~nses, partisan activities, naval activities, political
situation in Italy, etc., 100 pp., 2-14 May 1944.
368) Siena Reports, IR 500 to IR 599 - Raw intelligence on enemy
defenses, allied bombings, war industry, enemy dumps in
Italy, etc., 110 pp., 14-31 May 1944.
369) Siena Reports, IR 600 to IR 699 - Raw intelligence on battle
order, defenses, submarine bases, airfields, enemy traffic in
Italy, etc., 115 pp., 1-19 June 1944.
370) Siena Reports, IR 700 to IR 799 - Raw intelligence on partisan
activities, rail and air traffic, battle order, defenses in
Italy, etc., 100 pp., 19 June 1944-11 July 1944.
371) Siena Reports IR 800 to IR 855 - Raw intelligence on battle
order, defenses, traffic, shipping, supply depots, partisan
activity, German and Fascist behavior in Italy, etc., 55 pp.,
13-15 July 1944.
372) Siena Reports (Bern) JB1 to JB44 - Raw intelligence on battle
order, military traffic, partisan activities, communications,
war industry, bombing results in Italy, etc., 100 pp.,
26 July 1944-18 Aug. 1944.
373) Siena Reports (Bern) JB45 to JB89 - Raw intelligence on battle
order, naval activities, defenses, organization of patriots,
war industry, airfields in Italy, etc., 62 pp., 18 Aug. 1944­
13 Sept. 1944.
374) Reports AC1 to AC26, Casablanca - Raw intelligence on condi­
tions in Germany, native situations in Fez and Morocco,
Arab nationalism, French political group, battle order in
Spanish Morocco, etc., 100 pp., 4 Dec. 1943-28 Mar. 1944.
375) Reports AB1 to AB50 (Bern) - Raw intelligence on troop identi­
fication, disposition and battle order in France, Italy and
Yugoslavia, French political situation, technical develop­
ments in Germany, etc., 65 pp., 28 Nov. 1943-9 Dec. 1943.
376) Reports AB51 to AB100 (Bern) - Raw intelligence on battle
order and air and naval information on France and Italy,
Mihai10vich-German agreement, German rockets, French and
German war production, etc., 65 pp., 10-29 Dec. 1943.
23
ALGIERS-SI
-INT-6
377)
Reports AB101 to AB150 (Bern) - Raw intelligence on battle
order in France, Yugoslavia, Russia and Italy, French
defenses, transportation in France and Italy, etc., 70 pp.,
29 Dec. 1943-25 Jan. 1944.
[32J
-
OSS lU.""W YORK .AND l"IiLD S1'ATI~ RECORDS
(FIELD FlIES: !CANDY, KUNMING, LONDON, HADRID, IDi:W YORK, PARIS, SHANGHAI. SINGAPORE).
BOX AND l"O.LIER LIS!'
RECORD QROOP 226
RN'l'RY168
Records maintained by OSS New York office, and
certain field stations. Collection consists of
personnel dossiers and lists of persons, both
American and foreign. recommended :tor special awards
and decorations; Reports of special operations
behind eneu\y lines in the Far East and. in Central
Europe: Hilitar,y studies of eneu\y Territory including
aerial photographs; Samples of morale operations
and. Japanese propagalXia; New York of:tice records
consisting of the Buxton Committee on Oral
Intelligence and Survey of Foreign Experts
activities; Minutes of meeting; Unit chrono fUes
and General Administrative records. Arranged
chronological.l;y. 1942-1947. Volume 41 cubic :teet.
(CIA. Job No. 61-881) Standard Form l1,S-A Job No. NC1­
226-80-1, Item No. 104.
"'Records in Entry 168 are arranged according to Field
station or by the main office, New Yonc.
[33J
CQiKANOO <FElU.TlOOS. SECURI1'I DAII:! BOI..tE'rINS, GENERAL
SPilmL ORIERS, S1'RIiXn'H REPORr8 (BOXES 6-1, P'QI..I£RS 105-113)
1.lUHKDIo. OPJaiA1'JXIW. 1UlPOR1'S.
.AJU)
~
6
F11e NQ.
101461'
1lJNKIHG_00
10S)An emp'tT tolder used aa a series d1rtder.
-AD.. 1
106)Oporatlonal Roport - Woe~ Oporat10nal Report, 33 pp., Mar.-Aug.l94.5.
107)Al.l. p8rsooml - Correapondence
11 pp., Kar.-Jul..l94.5.
1'8
Cb1.na Theater Commando Operat:1.orus.
108)Seeur1ty - Correspondeoce 1'8 securlty and safeguard1.ng mU:1.tary
1n!'ormat1.otl, 2S pp., Aug.194S.
l(9)Da1JJ &llet1.n:s - Kunm1.ng ~ Bull.et1ns, 216 pp•• Kar.-Sept.194.5.
110)Spec:1.al Orders IQ &: IQ DET. 00 _
Mar.-Sept.194.5.
ass
China Theater IQ. 210 pp••
111)MeIll~anda, Headquarters. HeQdquarters aJXi Headquarters Detach. ­
MelllOranda re sa> tor torms and procedure. security. transportation.
SUPpJJ. cOUllld.s:d.ons, etc •• 119 pp., Kar.-ilug.19 4 S.
112)Geosral. Orders. Ch1Da Theater _ Geoeral. Orders re awards and medals.
Ch1na Tbeater t1nance. etc •• 33 pp•• Apr.-Sept.194.5.
llJ)strengtb Reporta Juns-Sept.194S.
ass
atrengtb 1"8porta tor Cb1na Theater.
149
pp••
2.ICOHKDKh JWlIO .AND CABlES HE ~ ISLANDS. ETC. (BOX 8, FOLIERS 114-31)
I!gx
1
lile l{Q.
Folder
114)Empt.)" tal.der c8pt100ed XUHKINQ_OO-RC-l and used. u
uer1es d1rtder.
11S)OO5. cbungk1.ng. Cables. Cb1Jla: Tbea.ter cables. 16 pp., Feb.-Sept.194S.
116)Apple - Cablea 1"8 Sol.OllIOn :Islanda,
Aprll-Sept.l94.5.
ass
China Theater. 124 pp.,
117)OJC, Cahlea - Operat10nal Group Colllllla1lCl Cables. 10 pp., Mar.-Sept.1945.
118)Detaehnaant Cables -
ass
China. 34 pp •• Mar.-Sept.194S.
119)Blueberry - ass China. cable. 1"8 Daly Rook. Treuur,y I&landa, near
the 50lolllOn leland". 78 pp•• JuJJ-Sept.194.5.
120)Cherr,y - Cables re San Cristobal. Solol1lon I8lands, 30 pp., Aug.-Sept..
194 .5.
121)Ch1hk1~ - Cables re US installation 1n Chihk1anc. 123 pp..
July_Sept. 1945.
[34]
File NQ.
14
Folder
206)14 Chops and Stamps with reoords - SI CT certificates and
credentials of NBidence. inoculation, travel perDl1ts. lII1.lltary
Bervice. etc.; also a box of 14 chops and stamps; 16) pp., 194)-4.5.
207) Chinese Combat Command ILOll, Transmittal Memos - approx . .50 pp.,
Feb.-Aug. 194.5.
208)0_2 China Theater YK..Oll Tramllllittal Memos - approx. 220 pp.,
Nov. 1944-Auc. 194.5.
2(9)JICA YK-Oll Transmittal Memos - approx. 80 pp., Hov.1944-Aug.194.5.
210)500 & Hear Koh. YK..Oll Transm1ttal. Mamos - approx. 6.5 pp.,
Feb. -Aug .194.5.
211)OSS-SACO ILoa Transm1ttal IIIl'mos - approx. 1;0 pp., Nov.1944­
Aug. 194.5.
212)MO - Transmittal. Memos, 19 pp •• ~-Aug.194.5.
8.KUNMING: CiUNA THE;ATER, AIMINISTRATIVB SUPPORI'. ORGANIZATIOO AND PROCUDURE (BOX
FOLDERS 21)-218)
15
File NQ.
Folder
KUNKlliQ_
SLAD..2
21) )lQ. Organization - Functions and organization of the
46 pp., Feb.-Aug.1945.
214)Sl Office Procedure -
ass
ass
p
5,
CT.
CT. 35 pp •• Mar.-April 1945.
215)Beporta _Sl Statf Keetlnca - Mm1n1strative l118etinga. 10 pp ••
Har.-Hq 1945.
216)SIOIS Organization - CT Organization or tho Geographical Intelligence
Section or the Secret Intelligence Branch. 5.3 pp •• Oct.l944-Mq 1945.
217)T/O for 5I - CT Table or Operations. 16 pp •• Jan.~ 1945.
218)!Wporta - CFSCQ{ Meetings - Operations and Collllll1lt11cations 1liIBetings,
41 pp •• Mar.-Aug.1945.
[35J
9.IUNM1HG: JAP.ANiSE MAPS, H.C. HILL INV"'~IOATICN, CORRESPON~CE, DEATH <F CAPT. JOHN
BrOCH (BOXES 15-16. Jl'OLIlERS 219-225)
15
File No.
Folder
KUNMING_
Sl-KAPS_l
219)Japanese Haps (How to Read _ Thirty maps of Palau, ~oto, ~aka,
Chichijima, She~a Ialands; two copies of a typescript explaining
Japanese maps, 11 pp. eaoh, n.d.
220)Har~ CHill _ Investigation of oharge of assault ~ Major
16
Harry C.
Hill and Capt. Julian Fl. Niemczyk of Canton ass Field Station upon
Anthony Christopher Hale on the night of 11-12 Oet.1945, 121 pp.
221)B1rd-Eagle _ Correspondence re withdrawal of ass fonn Hsian. 20 pp.,
Aug. _Sept. 1945.
222) OSS CT Correspondence - Correspondence re personnel; personal.
history lStatements, )1 pp., 194.5-46.
22)Pers/Whitaker _ Col.John T.Wh1taker, ass Chungking, cammendation and
award, 24 pp., Aug._Sept. 1945.
224) Lt..Guy Martin
_ Assignment of Lt.Martin, June_July 1945.
22.5)Death of Capt. John Birch _ ass Capt. John M. Birch. killed on August
25, 194.5 between ld. Chuan and Hwang Ko in the Shantung Peninsula by
qy Chinss8 CoalmuniBt Troops; cOITVspondence, cabl.es, t.estimol'\Y of Tung
Fu Kuan, reports and accowtts, wo six JIIX 4 11 positive and six negative
photographs showing the bod;y
126 pp., Aug. 194,5...Ka.r. 1946.
10.KUNHDIG: SECR6'T INT&.LIOENCE, FRENCH INDO-CHINA, AiRIAL PwrooRAPHS AND SKEl'CHES OF
BRIIXlBS DI CHINA (BOX 16, FOLDERS 226-221)
lo1der
16
17
1CUWaNG_
SLPH01'O-l
226)Aerial Pbotographs of French Indo-Ch1na - Twenty-five aerial
photographs, grid squares 1apoeed, o~ Saigon, Hanoi, Haiphong,
Ninh Binh, Namh Dinh and otmr Vietnameae cities r~1ng trom
lOll x 19 11 to 22 11 X 29 11 in size, prepared by the 18th Photo
Intell1gence Det., 14th Air Force, 1944.
227 )Sketebes of Bridges in China Done from Aerial Pbotograpb8 ­
Tb1rt1'-tive sketches of bridges, approx. 12 11 x 18" in size, and
an alphabetical list, 1944.
[36]
11.KtlNK!NG: SPECIAL OPERATlOOS, PERSOONEL, PRCMOTlOOS, CITATlOOS (BOX 17-18, Folders 228-35)
File No.
folder
KUNKrnG_
SQ..PEHS-1
228)Personnel File I - Correspondence, cables, personnel lists re
I"6gulationa, eecur1ty, pay allotment, le ave, I"6cruitment, etc.,
87 pp., Feb.-Ma.Y 19 4 5.
229 )Personnel II - Correspondence and cables 1'6 jWllp status, commendations
personnel transfer, discharge, disposition and aVailability, etc.,
135 pp., June-Oet.19 4 5.
230)Promotions - CT 11,( Det promotion papers, 66 pp., April_June 1945.
231)Promotions II - CT HQ Det promotiun papers, approx. 215 pp.,
June_Oct. 1945.
232)Citations - CT ass I"6commendationa for awards and citations,
including descriptions o£ the agent' B role in SO teams, etc.,
203 pp., ~- Oct.1945.
233 )Bronae Service Arrowhead - ass :iQ CT authorization for parachute
insignia, approx. 100 PI'· , Sept • 191~ 5.
234)Roster of SO Personnel - Lists of CT Special Operations teams
and personnel, 22 pp., April-Sept.1945.
18
23.5)oas Marauder Badgee - :I3sue of OSS identification buttons and a
Marauder Corps button. 19 pp•• WN ,June_July 1945.
Ill.LONOON STATION
1 • I.ONIX:ti
File No.
18
Folder
2J6)M1.nutes of Executive C01'IIII1ttee Meetings _ Organization charts tor
let Arrrr:f ass; Jainutee o£ _etings on reoccupation of Norw~, the
5uasex Plan, strength of varloutl resistance groups, psychological
warfare, and administrative matters, Col.J.Russel Forgan, pI"65iding,
29 pp., Mar .-Dec.1944.
LCNDOO_
CQIIMO-EQ_2
LCIiI~-COMKO
-PERS_1
2J?)Inventories Area
"cn - Equipment
and 8Upplies, 42 pp., Aug.-Nov.l9'+4.
2J8)Survey Report 141.8 - Autolllobile accident of 28 Oct.1944, accident
report, cost estimate, )2 pp., Mar._Nov.1944.
2J9)Daily Sick Report - OSS Det reports, two pamphlets, 194 3-45.
240)British Personnel 200 - Withdrawal Notice.
LOO~_OSS
-PERS-32
241)Withdrawal Notice.
[37J
10. LONDON: SO BRANCH RESEARCH (BOXES 33-34, FOLDERS 462-471)
Box
33
File No.
Folder
LONDON-SO
-RES-1
462) Withdrawal Notice.
LONDON-SO
-RES-3
464) LONDON-SO-RES-3 - Plans for target intelligence file
SO archives, 52 pp., 5 July 194~ - 4 Aug. 1945.
463) SO Branch Files, 1943, R & A - Lists of Italian and
German materials captured in North Africa, German
occupation of Norway based on censor materials, in­
formation on Hungarian oil, Italian electric power,
bombing objectives in Yugoslavia, 109 pp., 27 Jan. 1943­
24 A~r. 1943.
465) Organization of Sabotage System - Photocopy of study
setting out sequence of steps in organizing sabotage
system, 28 pp., 19 Apr. 1941.
466) L & C Areas, SZ-012-B04 - Handbook 01' German Military
Administration of L. C. areas, security protection
of convoys and:dumps, Germany sentry system~ plan of
Etampes, France, pictures of German soldiers, 38 pp ••
Dec. 1943.
467) Guerilla Warfare in Russia and Poland, SC-012-804,
R 986 - Describes composition and activities of
Russian and Polish partisan groups, German military
and police administration in Russia, application of
East European experiences to Western Europe, pictures
of uniforms and identification badges, ~, pp.,
Jan. 1943 and supplement Jan. 1944.
468) street Fighting, Folder 1, SZ-012-804 - Describes
principles used by Germans and Russians in assault
and defense of towns, eyewitness aocounts of Stalin­
grad street lighting, pictures of campaign in west
in 1940, Russian campaign in 1941, 1942, 66 pp., n.d.
469) 4 Enclosures "Enemy Weapons", Folder 2, SZ-012-804 ­
"German Infantry Weapons 1941", 29 pp., "Italian and
German Infantry Weapons 1942", 71 p,P., "German Light
Anti-Airoraft and Anti-Tank Guns 1942", 87 pp.,
"German Intantry, Heavy AA and Divisional Artillery
1943", 114 pp.
470) Sabotage Handbook - Vol. 7, pts. I and IV "Military
Targets, Part I, civilian and military road signs;
Part IV, airfields and their defense; Appendix A,
aircraft; Seotion II, RDF stations, 72 pp., 1942.
471) The German Armoured Division, SZ-012-804 - Desoribes
organization and identifioation of unite and their
headquarters, piotures of weapons and vehicles, 118 pp. ,
Aug. 1943.
[38]
11. MADRID ORGANIZATIONAL PLANS (BOX 34, FOLDERS 472-474)
Box
34
File No.
Folder
MADRID-OSS 472) Madrid Conference - Organization of Madrid and
-AD-l
other Iberian penninsula offices, plans for con­
tinued operations, relationship with Embassy, 220
24 Sept. 1943 - 3 May 194~.
p~.,
473) !organizational Plans7 - Operational and organiza­
tional plans, personnel needs, description of intelli­
gence network and future plans, oil observers, Embassy
relationshp, 38 pp., 17 June 1943 - 31 May 1944.
474)
!Top Secret Materials List7 - List of Top Secret
ARTICHOKE material in ARGUS' safe, 2 copies, 3 pp.,
25 Oct. 1944.
[39]
BOX
FILE NO.
FOLDER
39
New York
OSS
Op·-5
551
RUSSIA - SECRET,
# 66
Notes on Russian Airports, Evaluation of
German successes on Rusian Front and Russ­
ian resilience, Attitude of Cossacks to the
War, (in Brazil.) 18 PP, Nov. 1941-May 1942.
552
ST. PIERRE and MIQUELON,
# 67
Confidential Report on the situation on
these Islands from the free French Dele­
gation,
9 PP, Dec. 1941.
553
SANTA DOMINGO,
# 68
A Letter concerning former residence of
"S.D." with valuable information, that
might be of value to OSS.
1 Item, May 1942.
554
SOUTH AMERICA - SECRET,
# 69
German plans for ATTACK on U.S. through
Brazil, Aegentina, and Chile. Reports of
The Bureau of Latin America Research;Offers
to re-establish Rubber Industry in Venzu­
ela. The Germans in Chile. Offers of assist­
ance from leading citizens of So. American
Countries.
26 Items, Jan. - Jume 1942.
555
YUGOSLAVIA -SECRET,
# 70
Background of Gen. Mikha Levitch - Politi­
cal situation. An evaluation of Peter Savo,
American citizen of Yugoslavian descent. The
three Sokich Brothers . The Italian h~~~
in the dismemberment of Yugoslavia. Notes
from Meeting at Inter-Allied Information
Center.
10 Items,
Oct.1941­
Apr. 1942.
556
MISCELLANEOUS - SECRET,
# 71
Jewish Affairs, Otto Less:ing and Censorship
Problems.Personnel Resumes of a "Profess­
ional Group of Refugees from Europe, "Flor­
ence Luckenbach" torpedoed near India.
Background Reports on Potential New Employ­
ees.
87 PP,
Sept. 1941 - July 1942.
557
ACCESS RESTRICTED,
Item No. 18553
558
# 72
~ISCELLANEOUS PASSENGER LISTS, et~ # 73
~ Propaganda Publication used by France in
Spain in 1937.(47 PP.)Notes on Libya plus
Map, (Cont'd. next page.)
[40J
BOX
FILE NO.
FOLDER
42
New York
OSS
Op.- 5
600
RESEARCH PAPER NO.2,
# 111
A Study of War Communiques, Methods and
Results. A research project on totalitarian
Communication- a table of Contents and App­
endix.
145 PP,
Jan. 1942
601
RESEARCH PAPER NO.1,
# 112
German Radio News Bulletins, Problems and
Methods of Analysis.
Table of Contents and Appendices.
83 PP,
Dec. 1941.
602
RESEARCH PAPER NO.5,
# 113
Data in a German defeat situation. Pre­
liminary remarks on a German Radio Communi­
cation in the winter of 1941-1942.
Indexes and Appendices.
81 PP,
June 1942.
603
ROCKEFE~LER FOUNDATION,
#114
Correspondence with RAYMOND B. FOSDICK of
the Rockefeller Foundation.
19 PP,
Jan.-March 1942.
604
SHORT WAVE RESEARCH INC.,
# 115
Record of German Cables sent to Refugees in
U.S. demanding~aid for relatives still in
Europe. Copies of letters written by Ital­
ians to relatives in U.S.
13 PP,
June 1941 - June 1942.
605
SHIPPING LISTS,
# 116
Aliens from Portugal, lists of U.S. Cit­
izens sailing from Lisbon. Complete Bio­
graphical information for each person.
16 Lists,
March 1943 - May 1944.
606
SHIPPING LISTS,
# 116
Continuation of Folder 605.
5 Lists,
Aug.1943- July 1944.
607
# 116
SHIPPING LISTS,
Aliens from Portugal arriving at Phila. Pa.
Biog. Info.
10 Lists,
Dec. 1942 - Jan.1945.
608
SHIPPING LISTS,
( See next page.)
43
New York
OSS
Op.- 5
# 116
[41J
60
60
FILE No.
FOLDER
New York
S/I
AD - 3
793
OFFICE - REPORTING BOARD;
Weekly Reports of Material sent to Washing­ ton.
Names and Dates of Reports.
9 PP,
October 1944.
794
FRENCH RESISTANCE MOVEMENT STUDY;
Post Liberation Survey of the Resistance
Movement.
Post Liberation Role of the French National
Council of Resistance. With Biographical
Index, Table of Contents.
142 PP,
Nov. 1944 - April 1945.
795
OFFICE - RETRENCHMENT;
Consolidation of certain Activities, and
changes in Office Space.
21 PP,
Oct. 1944 - Dec. 1944.
796
OFFICE - RETRENCHMENT;
Spring and Summer of 1945,
Further reduction of Personnel and space.
24 PP,
March - July 1945.
797
RESEARCH BUREAU of POPULATION MOVEMENTS;
Miscellaneous Memorandum about Personnel
and Salaries, etc.
27 PP,
July 1943 - June 1944.
798
OFFICE - SAN FRANCISCO;
Administrative and Personnel Matters.
47 PP,
Oct. 1942 - July 1945.
799
OFFICE - OSS SCHOOL;
Proposed syllabus of Training, Orientation
Programs, Training, Procedures, etc.
211 PP,
Aug. 1942 - July 1944.
800
(A) OFFICE - SECURITY, (General);
Correspondence, Memos, Directives, etc.
About building Security, Materials Security,
Regulations, etc.
154 PP,
Dec. 1942 - Dec. 1944.
801
(B) OFFICE - SECURITY, (General);
Same as above.
34 PP,
Jan. - July 1945.
802
SECURITY - RULES and REGULATIONS; (Cont'd. /
[42]
BOX
FILE No.
61
New York
S/I
AD - 3
FOLDER
811
SERVICE "Z" j
A Permanent Intelligence Service for U.S.
in Post War World ?
Questions, Suggestions, Comments, etc. from
Staff.
August - Cctober 1944.
33 PP,
812
OPFICE - STAFF MEMBERS - COMMISSION;
Commissions and proposed Commissions for
Certain Employees.
22 PP,
July 1942 - August 1943.
813
TELEPHONE SECURITY;
Correspondence with New York Telephone Co.,
Inter~office Memos.
9 PP,
Jan. - May 194J.
814
BREWERY and CIGARETTE MACHINERY;
Construction of Brewery in BAGHDAD, other
Business Deals in Middle East.
55 PP,
May 1944 - Feb. 1945·
815
RADIO PHOTOS;
Radio Photos from the SWISS Press via RCA.
6 PP,
June 1944.
61
New York
S/I
PERS. -4
816
PERSONNEL - APPLICATIONS;
Recrui ting, £aQkg~ound Reports on Appli ­
cants, etc.
116 PP,
June 1943 - Jan. 1945.
62
New York
S/I
PROPA .-1
817
JAPANESE PROPAGANDA;
Japanese Photos and Stories of Military Cam­
paigns and American Prisoners of War.
Printed in English, The Philopino Story.
57 Items,
1942.
818
PRo--JAPANESE PROPAGANDA, (Cont'd.);
Business and Industrial Development (The
New Order in Greater East Asia).
The Battle of Hawaii (Pearl Harbor), Japa­ nese Picture Magazine "FREEDOM".
62 Items,
1942.
819
PRo--JAPANESE PROPAGANDA (Cont'd.);
Fall of CORREGIDOR, with Pictures (nega ­
tives ) and narrative account activities
in China, Mandalay.
82 Items,
1942.
[43]
FILE No.
62
FOLDER
New York
S/I
Propa.-l
820
PRO-JAPANESE PROPAGANDA, (Cont'd.)
Occupation of Shanghai, the Japanese Home­
land Stories and Pictures of Prisoners of
War, (American and English.)
45 Items,
1941 - 1942.
New York
S/I
Res. -1
821
ELECTRIC POWER - FOREIGN;
Need for more information about Power
Resources in Europe.
8 PP,
Aug. - Sept. 194J.
New York
S/I
Res.-2
822
OFFICE of WAR INFORMATION;
Inter-Office Memos.
Sept. - Oct. 1942.
2 PP,
82J
OFFICE of WAR INFORMATION;
Language Schedule,
A Compilation of Programs on American
Short-wave Stations beamed to Europe and
Far East.
56 PP,
Sept. 1942.
824
OFFICE of WAR INFORMATION;
Correspondence between OWI and OSS,
Newspaper clippings OWI.
67 PP,
July 1942 - May 1945.
825
CALENDAR of SIGNIFICANT EVENTS - OWI;
PUblications issued semi-monthly by OWI,
Listing by Month, Anniverseries and events
World-wide. From the 13th. Century to
World War -- (II) two.
6 Booklets.
826
CALENDAR of SIGNIFICANT EVENTS - OWI;
Same as above,
8 Booklets.
827
FRENCH BRIDGES - PART TWO, (2);
Voluminous report includes,
List of Bridges, Photostats, Maps, gen ­
eral Information, etc.
11 PP,
(No date.)
828
BELGIUM BRIDGES - PT - 1 - A.
Same type material as in Folder # 827.
18J PP,
(No dates)
829
BELGIUM BRIDGES - PT - 1 - B. (Cont d. )
(nxt. Pg. )[44]
New York
S/I
Res .-J
1
BOX
FILE No.
New York
S/I
Res. -3
FOLDER
829
BELGIUM BRIDGES - PT - 1 - B.; (Cont'd.)
A continuation of Folder # 828.
24 PP,
(No date.)
830
NETHERLANDS BRIDGES - PT - ~ ;
Material organized as Per Folder # 827,
All photostats.
148 PP,
(No. date.)
64
NEW YORK
S/I
Res .-4
831
64
New York
S/I
Res.- 5
832
LABOR RELATIONS - GENERAL PAPERS;
European Labor Research, (The Toni Sender­ Group) .
Numerous Reports, Toni Sender, former soc­ ial Democrat , Member of the German Reich­ stag.
120 PP,
May - Nov. 1942.
833
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP:
Reports Czechoslavakia,
(Labor situation and Labor resistance).
Labor situation in Germany.
Belgium (an Inside report).
Foreign Labor in Germany, etc.
253 PP,
Sept. - Oct. 1942.
New York
S/I
Res.- 5
fEXpORT LICENSES - BALL BEARINGS.;1
Spain and the shipment of Ball Bearings
to that Country.
11 PP,
Feb. 1944 - May 1944.
834
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP-RPTS.
Toni Sender Group reports,
French Moroco, Switzerland, Spain, Fin ­
land, and others.
233 PP,
Nov. 1942.
835
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP- RPTS.
Administrative Reports,
Reports on Activities of Research Group.
12 PP,
Aug - Sept. 1942
836
LABOR RELATIONS, TONI SENDER GROUP;
Correspondence,
Memos to Headquarters covering Trans ­
missions of Reports.
83 PP,
Nov. 1943 - Feb. 1944.
837
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP;
(Cont'd. nxt. pge.)
[451
FILE No.
New York
SII
FOLDER
8.37
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP, (MEMOSJ
Labor Relations, - Memoranda,
Toni Sender Group,
Actually reports dealing with Occupied
Europe, and Germany, gathered from in ­
dividuals and organizations.
161 PP,
Aug. - Dec. 1942.
8.38
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP, (CORR.)
Correspondence, a continuation of Folder
# 8.36.
195 PP,
May. - Dec. 1942.
8.39
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP,(Corr.)
Correspondence,
See Folder # 8.36, plus suggestions and re­
commendations from Sender to Headquarters.
217 PP,
Jan.- March 194.3.
840
LABOR RELATIONS;
Memos and Correspondence covering same
SUbject Matter as in previous Folders.
199 PP,
April - Oct. 194.3.
841
TONI SENDER GROUP - MEMOS;
Some reports on Avtivities of Group,
Memos from Sender to Headquarters keep ­
ing them abreast of Labor Developments.
464 PP,
April - Dec. 194.3.
842
TONI SENDER GROUP - (MEMOS.);
A continuation of Material found in Folder
# 841, Projects, Valuable Contacts, etc.
414 PP,
June 1942 - Apr. 194.3.
84.3
LABOR RELATIONS - TONI SENDER GROUP,MEMOS;
Miscellaneous reports, !Vlemos, etc. concern­
ing Europian Labor Research group from
Sender to Arthur Goldberg.
102 PP,
Nov. 194.3 - Aug. 1944.
844
TONI SENDER - EUROPEAN LABOR RESEARCH;
MEMOS FOLDER # 1.3;
Some Memos but Mostly Reports dealing with
Labor conditions, Union Activities, etc in
Germany and other Countries of Europe.
Also transportation problems.
146 PP,
Nov. 1942 - Mar. 194.3
Res.- 5
66
New York
SII
Res.- 5
New York
845
TONI SENDER;
(Cont'd. nxt. pge.)
[46J
BOX
FILE No.
FOLDER
New York
S/I
Res.- 5
845
TONI SENDER - EUROPEAN LABOR RESEARCH,
MEMOS, FOLDER # 13 B.;
A continuation of Folder # 844.
250 PP,
Sept. - Oct. 1942.
846
IAUSTRIA - LETTERS, FOLDER # 14;J
~etters to Austrians living out-side Eur
ope asking for help in gathering Factual
Material of Labor situation in Germany,
Austria and Axis ruled Countries.
(Letters in German.)
6 PP,
Aug. - Oct. 1942.
847
AUSTRIANS in BRITAIN (FOLDER # 15);
Exchange of Letters and Reports, between
Private Citizens, Austrian Organizations
in Exile and European Labor Research.
44 PP,
Aug. 1942 - Oct. 1944.
848
AUSTRIANS in U.S. - ~;
Similar Material as in Folder # 847.Mostly
in German.
106 PP,
Mar. 1942 - Dec. 1943.
849
BALTIC STATES - # 17;
Labor in Lithuania.
Reports and Correspondence as in previous
Folders.
20 PP,
Aug. 1942 - July 1943.
850
BELGIANS in BRITAIN, - # 18;
Reports from Belgian Organizations (all in
French. )
75 PP,
Dec. 1942 - Feb. 1944.
851
BELGIANS in U.S. - # 19;
Compilation of Belgian Nationals, Addresses,
and Backgrounds, and Correspondence.
35 PP,
Sept. 1942 - Nov. 1943·
852
BULGARIA - # 20;
Correspondence and Reports with and from
VICTOR SHARENKOFF, President of~·
Feder­ ation 0 t
tional Clubs, about Labor, and Agriculture
Conditions in Bulgaria.
(no pages, no dates.)
[47]
FILE NO.
74
FOLDER
Paris­
MO
AD -1
Paris­
MO
Pers-2
PARIS
Memos
ures,
15
946
Paris­
MO
Pers-J
Paris­
MO
Pers-4
OFFICE
SECURITY MEMOS;
dealing with Personnel and Proced­ etc.
PP.
Sept. - Oct. 1944.
PARIS OFFICE - MISC. (MAJ. RUSSEL);
Memos dealing with Assignments of Per­
sonnel, Travel Orders, Proposed Radio
Programs, Recruitment of Agents for op­
erations within Germany, etc.
J8 PP.
Jan. - March 1945.
PARIS OFFICE
INTER BRANCH MEMOS;
Requests for Clearance of Personnel,
Transfer of Personnel, from England to
Paris, etc.
14 PP.
October, 1944.
948
PARIS OFFICE
- MOVEMENT BACK TO LONDON;
Names of Persons ordered back to London,
Disposal of equipment, etc.
16 PP.
October,1944.
PARIS OFFICE
MORNING REPORTS;
Rosters of Military and Civilians (Amer­
icans and French) assigned to Hq. and Hq.
Detachment OSS, MO Branch.
82 PP.
Sept. - Dec. 1944.
Paris
MO
PERS-5
Paris­
MO
Pers-6
950
PARIS OFFICE "GRUCHOL & LANTER CASE,'I
(MAJ. RUSSEL.);
Two (2) French Citizens and the efforts
of the OSS to separate them from the em­
ploy of The OSS.
24 PP.
Jan. - April 1945.
Paris­
951
LETTERS, NOTES and FORMS;
War Diaries and Daily Work Reports of
twenty-one (21) Field Dectachments Sec­ tion (FIDES) Material refers to Acc~­
plishments, Personnel experiences of Mis­ sions and detachments, but not the sub­ stance.
168 PP.
Dec. 1944, Aug.1945.
952
ORDERS;
Includes War Dept. Circulars and other
Instructional Releases.
108 PP.
March - July 1945.
(See nxt. pge.)
[48]
oss
AD-l
PARIS
OSS
AD-2
953
BOX
FILE NO.
FOLDER
74
Paris Si
Pers-2
962
P.O.W. PAPERS;
Names of German Prisoners of War, their
backgrounds, personal Histories, etc.
These are pencilled notes obviously made
by interrogating Personnel.
10 PP.
(No date)
963
PRISONERS of WAR;
Proposed use of German Prisoners of War
as Agents, subsequent Memos, and Cables,
etc.
58 PP., Aug. 1944. - Jan. 1945.
Paris Si
Pers-4
964
P.O.W. SCHOOL;
A cross section of questions to potential Agent and his answers, including
German Military Units, Drawings, etc.
93 PP. Sept. - November 1944.
Paris Si
Pers- 5
965
P.O.W. SCHOOL;
Same type of material as Folder 964. Both
Folders entirely in German and French.
58 PP.
(No month)1944.
Paris Si
Pers-6
966
Discarded Candidates;
A short List of German P.W.A's rejected.
2 PP.
(No date)
Paris OSS
Photo-l
967
&ERMAN TROOP REPRISAL§] - FRENCH VILLAGES;
8" x 10 and 1/2", Glossy Prints of Homes
destroyed, Villages identified.
27 Pictures
Aug. 1944.
968
GRAVES of MARQUISE;
4" x 5' snapshots of Bodies being exhumed at Communal grave-site. An expla nation of scene on each snapshot.
19 Pictures,
Sept. 1944.
969
1S F DETACHMENl1 -
# 12;
~up pictures of Unit in London, moved
to France and Personnel in the Field
(France) .
One picture, Commander of German U-Boat,
188.
28 Pictures
Aug. 1944.
970
(See nxt. pge.)
[49]