Scientific classification Download

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IN THE NAME OF ALLAH THE
MOST BENEFICENT,THE
MERCIFUL
ORDER MANTODA
ORDER DERMAPTERA
ORDER THYSANOPTERA
BY: TOOBA ARSHAD
Contents
Contents
ORDER MANTODA
Scientific classification
Morphology
Reproduction
ORDER DERMAPTERA
Scientific classification
Morphology
Reproduction
ORDER THYSANOPTERA
Scientific classification
Morphology
Reproduction
ORDER MANTODA
ORDER
MANTODA
Some common species
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Subclass:
Infraclass:
Superorder:
Order:
Sphodromantis viridis
Animalia
Arthropoda
Insecta
Pterygota
Neoptera
Dictyoptera
Mantodea
Introduction
Mantodea or mantises is an order of
insects that contains approximately
2,200 species in 15 families worldwide
in temperate and tropical habitats.
Most of the species are in the family
Mantidae.
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Order
Mantodea,
Family Mantidae
Pronunciation: man-TOEdee-ah, MAN-ti-dee
Common
names: mantid,
praying mantis
Identifying characteristics for the Mantodea
Front legs spined and modified for grasping and
holding prey.
Prothorax and procoxae prolonged; middle and hind
coxae shorter.
Tarsi 5 segmented.
Head in frontal view triangular.
Antennae short, filiform.
Additional information
•The 20 North American species are all
in the family Mantidae.
•Many taxonomists lump mantids and
cockroaches together in the order
Dictyoptera.
Anatomy and morphology
Mouthparts
Mouthparts: Chewing
Wings: 2 pair: Mesothorax wings toughened (=tegmina) to protect
membraneous, folded (fan-like) metathoracic wings.
Body characteristics
front legs modified for grasping, elongate, thin body & legs for camouflage egg
- distinctive egg case
Where found: Camouflaged in vegetation - highly predacious so found alone.
Morphology
[2]Eyes
Size: from 1 cm
(Mantoida tenuis) to
>17 cm (Ischnomantis
gigas)
and labrum: Close up image of a
mantis' face (Archimantis latistyla)
showing its compound eyes and
labrum. The structure of the compound
eye creates the illusion of a small pupil.
Foreleg
Modifications
Mantises have two
grasping, spiked
forelegs in which
prey items are
caught and held
securely.
Behaviors
Diet and predatory behavior
Mantises are exclusively predatory.
Insects form the primary diet, but
larger species have been known to
prey on small lizards, frogs, birds,
snakes, fish, and even rodents; they
will prey upon any species small
enough to successfully capture.
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Reproduction
The female may start feeding by biting off the male’s head
(as they do with regular prey), and if mating had begun, the
male’s movements may become even more vigorous in its
delivery of sperm.
Reproduction
Courtship display has also
been observed in other
species, but it does not hold
for all mantises.
The mating season in
temperate climates typically
begins in autumn.
Conservation
status
Only
one
Spanish
species,
Apteromantis aptera, is listed as
Lower Risk/Near Threatened. With
one exception (the ground mantis
Litaneutria minor in Canada, where it
is rare — though it is common in the
United States), North American
mantises are not included among
threatened or endangered species.
Mythology
Southern African indigenous mythology
refers to the praying mantis as a god in Khoi
and San traditional myths and practices, and
the word for the mantis in Afrikaans is
hottentotsgot (literally, the god of the Khoi).
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Life Cycle
Metamorphosis
incomplete, generally
with seven or more molts
before maturity.
Eggs are laid late in the
season in an egg case, or
ootheca (first foamy, then
papery after the foam
sets) and hatch in the
spring.
Order Dermaptera- Earwigs
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Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Subfamily:
Class:
Order:
Animalia
Arthropoda
Hexapoda
Insecta
Dermaptera
(Earwigs)
Some species of this
order
Other Common
Names
Pronunciation
• durr-MAP-turr-uh
• Pincher Bugs
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Explanation of
Names
Dermaptera = "skin
wings" Refers to the
leathery texture of
the forewings.
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Introduction
Earwigs make up the insect order
Dermaptera, found throughout
the Americas, Eurasia, Australia
and New Zealand. With 1,800
species in 12 families, they are
one of the smaller insect orders.
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Size
6-35 mm
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Identification
Earwigs have slender flattened
body, bead-like antennae, and are
easily recognized by the pair of
large pincers (cerci) at the tip of
the abdomen. Adult males have 10
abdominal tergites; females, 8.
Some are wingless, but in most the
fore wings are represented by
short leathery covers called
tegmina, under which the hind
wings (if present) fold in a unique
fan-like fashion leaving a chitinized
triangular part exposed.
The pincers' shape is highly speciesspecific in males (asymmetrical in
some groups) but quite uniform in
females throughout the order.
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Range
Mostly in warm climates;
very few range far north.
Habitat
Earwigs are sensitive to heat and dryness, so they usually
hide in cool, dark places during the day and come out at
night. Some species hide mostly under leaves, rocks and
other debris, while others hide under the bark of trees.
Length
Most earwigs are
flattened with an
elongated body
generally 7–50
millimetres (0.28–
2.0 in) long, though
some can grow
longer, such as the
Saint Helena earwig
which reaches
80 mm (3.1 in) long.
Morphology
Differences between
male and female
• Earwigs are characterized by
the cerci, or the pair of forcepslike pincers on their abdomen;
male earwigs have curved
pincers, while females have
straight ones.
• These pincers are used to
capture prey, defend
themselves and fold their
wings under the short
tegmina. The antennae are
thread-like with at least 10
segments or more.
Season
Year-round, but
often
inactive/hiding in
cold or dry weather.
Food
Plants, organic matter, other insects
(sozme are almost exclusively
carnivorous, and many are important
in controlling soil pests).
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Life Cycle and reproduction
• Simple metamorphosis with visible
changes including increasing number of
antennal segments and progressive wing
development until sexual maturity. The
mother cares for the eggs and nymphs.
Order Thysanoptera Thrips
7]
some common spp.
Classification
Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Animalia (Animals)
Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Insecta (Insects)
Order
Thysanoptera (Thrips)
Explanation of Names
Thysanoptera = "fringe wing", Greek--thysanos =
fringe plus pteron = wing. (The wings of thrips are
characteristically fringed with long hairs)
Numbers
Size
From 0.5 to 5 mm
long, but typically
about 1 to 2 mm.
704 species in
141 genera in 5
families in North
America, listed
on two pages at
nearctica.com
More than 5,000
described species
worldwide.
Identification
• Thrips are
• Small insects, 0.5 to 5 mm long.
• Four wings, narrow, with few veins, fringed with long
hairs.
• Mouthparts of sucking type, stout conical proboscis
(beak).
• Short antennae, 4-9 segments.
• Tarsi 1-2 segments.
• Metamorphosis is intermediate between simple and
complete. The first 2 instars have no external wings.
Identification
• The males and females look similar, but males a bit
smaller.
• Several generations in a year.
• Plant feeders, flowers, leaves, fruits, twigs, buds.
Few species feed on fungi, few are predaceous.
• Feeding destroys plant cells, they empty the cells
which become silverish in color. If the attack is
heavy, plant tissue will turn brown and dry up.
• Thrips are often vectors of diseases.
Range
Worldwide
Habitat
Plant-feeding thrips are generally found on soft living plant tissue, though some larval
stages may be spent on soil.
Food
Most species feed on plants, though some feed on fungus spores or are predaceous on
other small arthropods. Plant-feeders often cause damage to leaves and flower petals.
Life Cycle
Life Cycle
Eggs are laid in plant tissue (when the female has
an ovipositor) or in crevices or under bark. In
suborder Terebrantia, first two instars are larval
stages followed by inactive third (prepupa) and
fourth (pupa) stages.
In suborder Tubulifera, the third and fourth stages
comprise the prepupa stage while a fifth stage is
the pupa stage.
During prepupa and pupa stages, the immature
thrips do not feed.
REFERENCE
http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/foltz/eny3005/lab1/orthopteroid/mantodea.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis
http://www.amentsoc.org/insects/fact-files/orders/thysanoptera.html
http://www.bijlmakers.com/entomology/classification/Thysanoptera.htm
http://bugguide.net/node/view/7754
http://www.cirrusimage.com/earwig.htm
http://bugguide.net/node/view/2709
http://bugguide.net/node/view/342391
http://ag.udel.edu/enwc/insectdb/mantodea.htm
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THANKS FOR YOUR PATIENCE
ANY QUESTION